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Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting

Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting | Geography Education | Scoop.it
architectural conjecture :: urban speculation :: landscape futures...

 

In the 1960s when the island of Surtsey (literally) erupted onto the scene off the coast of Iceland, it's national sovereignty was not really called into question.  The seamount, or near island named Ferdinandea in the Mediterranean is not even an island yet and countries are already positioning themselves to claim it.  Only 6 feet below sea level, this seamount is incredibly valuable real estate because is a country can successfully came this territory, they could also lay claim to an Exclusive Economic Zone, extending up to 200 nautical miles beyond the coast.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:23 PM

When I read something like this all I can think is maybe this is what happened to Atlantis.  What if Atlantis was an island like this that existed just long enough for people to build a society on and then it sank beneath the sea.  Another think this makes me think of is the novel “Jingo” by Terry Pratchett, in it an island rises from the sea and leads to a war over which country owns it.  This is just an interesting phenomenon that leads to world arguments.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:29 PM

The EEZ policy that exist has made every space up for contentious conflict. The miles off the coast of Surtsey and other small islands have become valuable because of EEZ and conflict exist over islands that are uninhabited and useless. Economic geography can influence political geography when it comes to these small island and their exclusive economic zone.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 12, 10:46 AM

You have to be joking with me!!!!!!!!

 

Claims for a volcanic-induced mass of land?  In this day and age, one would hope that something like this would not lead to a long and drawn-out dispute.  There is much more pertinent issues present in this world.


 How about this for an idea?  Let's leave the "island" neutral and allow it it to be used as a temporary destination for whomever visits it.  It should be protected and preserved by everyone interested but not so much that visitors cannot temporarily explore and enjoy the island.  

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