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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Suggested by Kyle Toner
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Obama visits storm disaster zone

Obama visits storm disaster zone | Geography Education | Scoop.it

KT: Obama has visited New Jersey to observe the damages sustained from hurricane Sandy. New Jersey got hit harder than most and has been severely flooded and damaged in several regions.

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UN High Commissioner for Refugees

UN High Commissioner for Refugees | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The key facts and figures about refugees, IDPs, asylum seekers and stateless people from UNHCR's annual Global Trends report.


Not all migation is voluntary.  Refugees and other non-voluntary migrants often are in their situation due to complex geographic factors beyond their control at the national scale. 


Tags: migration, population, development, conflict, statistics, war, unit 2 population.

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, January 21, 2013 9:20 PM

Good source for stats on non-voluntary migrants.

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Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century

Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Do you want some inspiration to create a visually stunning - yet fully optimized - data graphic? Well, let's go back about a 140 years... Handsome Atlas developed by Jonathan Soma of Brooklyn Brainery, provides a stunning new online interface to a large collection of beautiful data visualizations from the 19th century.


TR: Taking into account the age of these visualizations, one has to wonder if they intended them to be used by our generation in this way. I see potential for a "web 2.0" update of these charts to make them interactive . . .


Tags: infographic, historical, visualization, statistics.

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Spatial Thinking Key to Solving Crime

Spatial Thinking Key to Solving Crime | Geography Education | Scoop.it

What are all these news reporters and school administrators doing in my classroom?  Monday, September 24, 2012 was most certainly an interesting day in my Mapping Our Changing World (GEOG 201) class...


One of my students applied some mapping skills and spatial analysis to a string of unsolved bank robberies in Rhode Island.  After 7 months of eluding capture with at least 8 robberies under his belt, the "bearded bandit" was apprehended less than 48 hours after my student handed over his analysis to a contact in the police department.  Coincidence?  I think not!  Great work Nic, showing that spatial thinking and geographic skills can be applied to a wide range of disciplines and activities. 


Tags: RhodeIsland, GIS, mapping, GeographyEducation, edtech.   

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, September 25, 2012 5:07 PM
Wow! Awesome story. Professor Dixon thanks for sharing this. Nic must be thrilled and you must be proud!
Matt Mallinson's comment, September 26, 2012 7:11 AM
Awesome presentation of it all, it was very interesting.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 5:58 AM
This is a great development! Today, there are so many unsolved crimes because of lack of investigative skills of our investigating authorities. So, if this new way of solving crimes can really help victims to attain justice, then we have to support it, by all means....
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The Body in Public Space

The Body in Public Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Here are some seemingly eclectic topics.  All of them center around the appropriateness of the body being displayed publicly and the cultural norms that shape how we think about the issue.  I've included a sensational restroom, public nursing, top-free protests, and of course, the Kate Middleton scandal.


Tags: culture, popular culture, gender, place, space.

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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 26, 2012 7:11 AM
Hilarious! The breasts of women are human parts of a woman which should be respected because it is where a human being feeds. It is a symbol of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 30, 2012 5:07 PM
This cartoon clearly shows how breast are sexually marketed in our society and how we will can accept the fashionably sexual display of breast in public yet consider breast feeding offensive. In many ways this cartoon seems to show how some social norms seem to interfere with common sense as we should be more critical of the sexual advertisement of breast while breast feeding on the other hand should at the very least be tolerated.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:37 PM

I think the men who prohibit public breast-feeding of babies should be starved.  I have a baby cousin, whom I love dearly, and I would hate to delay his lunch as much as anyone else would hate to have their own lunches delayed.  To prohibit public-breastfeeding is cruel, discriminatory, and hypocritical, as these prohibitors were likely publicly breastfed at some point in their infant days.  A message overall about other people acting 'scandelously'- get over it.  Grow up.  I don't like having to hear from or about you, and it takes away from my definition of a perfect world when I see people starving my baby cousin.  Culture should accomodate to the entirety of the population, not a majority.  After all, as for babies- we've all been there, and as for old people- we'd be lucky to live that long, but we'll llikely be there too.  I don't think we should be governed by someone that some people elect and other people don't vote for, because it's really not fair... it would be better and a compromise to not be governed at all!  So don't be critical, be understanding... Peace and Love!

Suggested by Nic Hardisty
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WORLDWIDE CARPETS : David Hanauer design

WORLDWIDE CARPETS : David Hanauer design | Geography Education | Scoop.it

David Hanauer has created sumptuous rugs that are inspired by Google Earth images.  These images in a repeating patterns create a stunning visual effect.  Paired with Persian styling to create unique, geography inspired carpets, this gallery has 6 different pieces in this art gallery.


Tags: art, google.

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Why Map Projections Matter

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection.  While a bit comical, the cartographic debate is quite informative even if it was designed to appear as though the issue was trivial. 


Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  


Tags: Mapping, geospatial, video, visualization

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Lydia Blevins's comment, September 13, 2012 3:17 AM
I think it is very important that we start using more accurate maps. In school, the maps we use are so different from how the world actually is. I agree that children will grow up thinking some places are less important because they are minimized by the map projection.
Greg Atkinson's comment, October 10, 2012 9:31 AM
Great clip. I use it in my WRG class as a comedic introduction to the power of projection.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, December 18, 2012 12:01 PM

This absolutely the best video clip for SS teachers EVER!

Rescooped by Seth Dixon from New York City Environmental Sustainability
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New York -- before the City

TED Talks 400 years after Hudson found New York harbor, Eric Sanderson shares how he made a 3D map of Mannahatta's fascinating pre-city ecology of hills, rivers, wildlife -- accurate down to the block -- when Times Square was a wetland and you...

 

KC: The Manhattan Project created a picture of the area before the development of a city, the way Henry Hudson did during his 1609 exploration. After 10 years (1999-2009), the research project has expanded to study the entire city of New York. The Welikia Project analyzes geography and landscape ecology to discover the original environment and compare it to present day. Scientists have learned that world's largest cities once had a natural landscape of freshwater wetlands and salt marshes, ponds and streams, forests and fields with an equally diverse wildlife community. By focusing on the city's biodiversity of 400 years ago and the modern era, information can be gathered about what has changed, what has remained constant, where the city was done well and where it needs to improve. This source is useful because it allows for the visualization of NYC in a way never seen before. Urban environments, such as NYC, have a landscape largely created by humans, so the skyscrapers, pavement, and mass population is far removed from the landscape it once was.

 

Find more information about the Welikia Project and more on New York City's urban ecology on this scoop.it topic.


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Kim Vignale's comment, August 12, 2012 11:03 AM
I was surprised on how green NYC is because of all the cars and urban development. I think this project topic is very informative and interesting (makes me want to got to NYC) . I thought it was very interesting how NYC was in the early 1900s and how it became now. I also think it's a great idea how adding more greenery to the urban city will add sort of a rural feel to a big city.
Rescooped by Seth Dixon from National September 11 Memorial & the World
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The 9/11 Dilemma: Freedom vs. Security

KH: How has America changed since the attacks of September 11, 2001? We are still struggling to find a balance between saftey and civil liberties. The Patriot Act, prisoners in Guantanamo Bay, interrorgation techniques have all become parts of our lives.

The article asks the questions...

• Can the government listen to our phone conversations and read our  e-mails without warrants?

• Should suspected terrorists at the Guantánamo prison in Cuba have the right to challenge their detention in court?

• How much power does the president have to search for and punish those accused of having terrorist ties?

• Are harsh interrogation techniques ever justified? And at what point do they become torture?

 

Do you remember a time when you could board a plane with friends or family seeing you off from the gate? Do you remember bringing liquids though security? The youth of this country do not.  For more resources on September 11th, check out this scoop.it topic.


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Gentrification in Providence

Gentrification in Providence | Geography Education | Scoop.it

KV: Development of a high end apartment complex in a low income area would force pre-gentrification people out of the neighborhood. The taxes would get raised to amounts that make it difficult for these people to afford. However, the people in charge of this project are ignoring the consequences and focusing on the 5 million dollars tax break. 

 

SD: This sign went up in to 2006 protest the mills-to-condo developments in Providence, Rhode Island.  Click here to see the photographer's work

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megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:41 PM
Gentrification has both positive and negative affects on the city. I believe that it is beneficial for a city to take older buildings and utilize them or flip them into malls or financially beneficial businesses for their economy. But on the other hand you are taking people who were living in these areas with low rent and after you flip these buildings the rent is going to rise substancially. Therefore these former residents cannot afford to stay in the apartments and have to relocate their homes. Its hard to pick a side.
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Is Gentrification Always Bad for Revitalizing Neighborhoods?

Is Gentrification Always Bad for Revitalizing Neighborhoods? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If done right, cities can preserve their character while bringing in new business...

 

RT: This article and it's sub-articles are very interesting, the main point of it however is the fact that gentrification can be done in a manner as such that it will not just demolish the old city but rather build upon it. Involving the residents would be a key factor in this process, more often then not it is the new ones moving in who decide the fate of the area. Retaining original buildings and recylcing them into something new helps preserve the original culture of the area. The main issue with gentrification is the loss of the familiarity within the area.

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Don Brown Jr's comment, August 1, 2012 6:12 PM
I agree that the objectives of gentrification should be shifted more towards improving what is already there rather than the more traditional method of attracting wealthier residences by displacing the local populace.
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Envisioning the Spatial University

Envisioning the Spatial University | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If geospatial technology helped us understand the costs, would we make different decisions about the value of electric reliability?

 

This is an excellent article that shows this as an important moment for geography.  Geospatial technologies have been official listed as a growth sector in the economy: where will the workforce gain these skills?  This is the perfect time to put geographic analysis together more firmly into the curriculum with the STEM disciplines so that spatial thinking throughout the curriculum.  Geospatial technologies such as GIS are a are a common space where geography and STEM discipline can meet.

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Mapping Mexico's gang violence

Mapping Mexico's gang violence | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Voters are counting on the next president to find a solution to the country's alarming rise in organised crime.

 

This interactive features shows temporal and spatial data on drug-related deaths in Mexico since 2007.  Also connected are profiles of the presidential candidates of the three major political parties (PRI, PAN and PRD) and with their platform on drugs and ways to curtail the accompanying violence.  Mexico's presidents can only hold office for one term, but it is a six-year term...2012 isn't just about Obama and Romney. 

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Sam Henry's comment, August 27, 2012 8:01 AM
I would be interested to see how the newly elected official will use this map and what their changes in the current approach will be
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Jodhpur - India's Blue City

Jodhpur - India's Blue City | Geography Education | Scoop.it

DB: The aesthetics of architecture within a society not only reveal the communities interpretation of what is considered beautiful or pleasing in appearance but also differentiates between what is considered sacred or important. The symbolic significance of aesthetics in colors, designs and a place of residence can be indicative of socioeconomic standing is within society and what the community values.  Jodhpur, India is well known for the beautiful wave of blue houses that dominate the landscape of a rather dry region. However, it is believed that these blue houses originally were the result of ancient caste traditions. 


Brahmins (who were at the very top of the caste system) housed themselves in these “Brahmin Blue” homes to distinguish themselves from the members of other castes. Now that the Indian government officially prohibits the caste system, the use of the color blue has become more widespread. Yet Jodhpur is one of the only cities in India that stands steadfast to its widespread aesthetics obsession with the color blue which is making it increasingly unique, creating a new sense of communal solidarity among its residence.

 

Questions to Consider: How has color influenced the cultural geography of this area?  How are the aesthetics of this community symbolic of India’s traditional past, present and possible future?


Tags: South Asia, culture, housing, landscape, unit 3 culture.

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Campaign 2012: Ohio turns blue

Campaign 2012: Ohio turns blue | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“It should have been a good year for the Republicans,” said Beckwith. “You have an incumbent president who is not doing well. The economy is bad. But Romney’s own mistakes have undermined his claim that he understands the voters …"

 

 DB: In this election both presidential candidates are attempting to appeal to the heritage, identity and community of the “American” people, leaning strongly towards middle and working class citizens who been hit hard the past decade by the countries economic downturn. States, especial during national elections can become highly symbolic of certain issues prevalent within America society. For example in the state of Ohio, the decline of manifesting jobs has become quite symbolic of the plight that is happening to hard working-class citizens across the country, particular the struggle of the American auto-industry. Ohio in many ways has become the electoral jewel of the Midwest serving as the political battleground in which both Democrats and Republicans alike are fighting for at all levels of government. The main reason why spectators believe that Ohio is gradually swinging towards Obama is Romney’s failure to connect with them. Despite all his campaign contributions a growing number of voters believe Romney does not share their identity or interest making him an outsider as they increasingly gravitate towards Obama. Furthermore, Romney seems unable to shed his identity as a wealthy businessman or "1%"er who represents corporate America. During different times in history states take on certain identities that may symbolize the agenda of specific groups within American society. The 2012 election has become highly symbolic of the economic uncertainty of the times we live in and the political competition between how it should be resolved.  So, what impact do you think Ohio will have on the upcoming election in November?

 

How can things like heritage, identity and community effect what a state or any other territory around the globe symbolize? Is the symbolism embedded in these areas continuous throughout history, inconstantly reinterpreted by different groups or both?

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Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas

Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Urban Agriculture Sprouts in Brazil’s Favelas - Organic agriculture is a growing trend in big cities around the world, including Latin America, and no...


This article nicely ties two commonly taught issues in human geography that aren't the the typical combination: 1) the growth of organic farming and 2) the spread of squatter settlements and slums in the developing world. 


Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities

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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 30, 2012 5:31 PM
I think this is an awesome idea. It shows that good things can come from places like these favelas, I'm guessing these organic foods are much healthier than what citizens are used to eating too.
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 30, 2012 6:12 PM
I found this to be a possitive aspect that can help the people in the favellas. They are growing their own food from their own homes and it allows them to have food and saftey because they dont have to worry about going somewhere far off to farm.
Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:03 PM

This is a new trend spreading to Brazil. Now with the organic craze that has been going around in past years farmers have sought out way to grow their food more organically. This also allows poor areas to benefit from organic farming because it is now present in their area and they can no buy food that is good and of their choice. 

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The League of Dangerous Mapmakers

The League of Dangerous Mapmakers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Redistricting today has become the most insidious practice in American politics—a way, as the opportunistic machinations following the 2010 census make evident, for our elected leaders to entrench themselves in 435 impregnable garrisons from which they can maintain political power while avoiding demographic realities.


Tags: political, gerrymandering, mapping, unit 4 political.

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.

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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 1:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find


Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.

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Yagmur Pak's comment, April 21, 2013 3:42 AM
The 100 People Foundation is designed to sketch a portrayal of the world in terms of population and wealth distribution by representing the entire global neighborhood through stories and illustrations. This Foundation provides immense opportunities to help students acknowledge the global issues facing our planet and improve their abilities on examining statistics about the world population. As a pre-service teacher, I would use this website to engage my Stage 2 students in learning about the diversity around the world and raising their awareness about the issues that affect the planet we all share. Students can contribute to this world portrait by celebrating someone or something in their community (e.g. interviewing Indigenous people about the diversity within their community) through photography and writing about the specific information about their part of the world. Such an assignment has the prospective to commence a discussion of understanding of who we are and what position we occupy in the world. This HSIE assignment can also be linked to a Mathematics lesson in which students collect data from their local community in small groups where they have a look at the diversity of specific groups between communities. Teachers can provide students with a few variables in order to make the task challenging, but well supported. I believe, the 100 People Foundation is offering captivating and thought-provoking resources to expand children’s view of the world which may provide vast opportunities for students to “develop awareness of similarities and differences of beliefs and practices in various cultures, and learn to detect and avoid cultural stereotypes and prejudices” (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008, p.9).

Reference:
Commonwealth of Australia (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Curriculum Corporation: Carlton South Vic.
ana boa-ventura's curator insight, June 27, 2013 11:31 PM

If you're looking at social media and diversity don't miss this site...In the last couple of years we've seen several sites / videos/ blogs rotating around the question 'if there were only 100 people in the world... ' In this case, children were asked to identify 'representative people' of that group of 100 and use visuals... many visuals.  And visuals of course bring up skin color, living conditions and much more. I don't want to be a spoiler though...Viist the site!

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 7:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

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Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This link is a companion site to the book, "Mapping the Nation: History & Cartography in 19th Century America" by Susan Schulten.  The author and publisher have made all of the images available digitally, and they are organized by chapter as well as chronologically.  This a great resource to find some of the important maps that shaped America and help mold the manner in which we conceptualize America.  Geography and history teachers alike will be able to draw on these materials.  The chapters include:

  1. The Graphic Foundations of American History
  2. Capturing the Past Through Maps
  3. Disease, Expansion & Rise of Environmental Mapping
  4. Slavery and the Origin of Statistical Cartography
  5. The Cartographic Consolidating of America


Tags: book reviews, historical, mapping, USA

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Rescooped by Seth Dixon from Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities
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Dark Days: When the Colts Left Baltimore

A look back on the 27th Anniversary of the the NFL Colts dark flight from Baltimore in the middle of the night.

 

BM: When the Colts left they took the heart of Balitmore and left the fans in utter disbelief. Robert Irsay had no intention of staying whether he got his new staidum for the Colts or not, he wanted out and had been looking since 1976. The city of Baltimore was not going to budge on the construction of a new pubically funded stadium simply because it was too expensive and the citry didn't have the money. All that remained in Baltimore was an empty Memorial Stadium, which wasn't perfect but was in really decent shape and the Orioles. 

 

SD: Why are sports teams treated so differently from other businesses?  How are teams linked to place in such intimate ways?  What is the economic impact of a sports team on the city and how could relocation damage that city?  See this scoop.it topic for more on the cultural and economic impacts of sports teams on cities.


Via Brandon Murphy
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Ms. Harrington's comment, August 8, 2012 6:09 AM
I never knew about this particular team, but I can see how a sports franchise abandoning a city has a devastating effect. It seems like there was a deliberate attempt to "sneak"out.
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, August 8, 2012 6:16 AM
Quite a blow to the entire city of Baltimore, you can see from the older footage as well as the new how badly this effected this city. A huge impact on the people, seemingly crushing spirits across the city.
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'Sharp drop' in India poverty

'Sharp drop' in India poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Poverty in India has dropped sharply thanks to increased spending on rural welfare programmes, the country's Planning Commission says.

 

KV: Government intervention has decrease poverty in rural India. More people are getting out of poverty in rural areas than urban areas. Programs funded by the government to help the poor has significantly changed many lives. People are given education, welfare, and proper sanitation. Once assistance is provided to the poor, the welfare and well being drastically changes for the better. As the Indian government prospers because of new business ventures, some of the increased revenue should be set aside to help many regions that are affected by poverty.

 

SD: For more resources on population, see this scoopit topic on the environment and society by KV.

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Bryan Tan's curator insight, February 2, 2013 7:54 AM

After reading this article, I am convinced that the gorverment in India know and want to do something about their currebt situation of being one of the poorest state in the world. Poepla are treated better given benefits, edeucation,welfare of the citizens and hygiene are all being taken care of by the gorverment. The gorvement starts improving their ties with other countries in the world helping it to gain more advantage. This helps to decrease the rate of poverty in India.

luisvivas64@hotmail.'s comment, February 3, 2013 7:19 AM
La pobreza es el càncer de la sociedad humana, ojalà sea posible reducirla, aunque soy escèptico, el dinero es muy sabroso y los pocos que lo tienen no lo sueltan, de allì las revoluciones, guerras ect.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 8, 2013 1:56 PM

Poverty in rural India has declined drastically, and much faster then in urban India. The decline is due to increased spending on rural welfare programmes, and rural poverty fell by 8% while urban poverty fell by 4.8%. I think this is great that the government is finally taking action and helping their people, instead of just 'sweeping them under the rug' in a way and pretending the issue isnt there.

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Gentrification: Views From Both Sides of the Street

Gentrification: Views From Both Sides of the Street | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Despite the fact that Detroiters will get the benefits of newfound energy, enthusiasm, and even money, it's unrealistic to expect a group who is scared of the unknown and having power stripped away to welcome outsiders with open arms.

 

 BM: Detroit has been down in a slump for a while and with gentrification(adding people of wealthier income) into the the Midtown neighborhood of Detroit. Despite the wealth of income in Midtown the rest of the City still has an average income of around $28,000 which is pretty weak compared to Midtown's average income of $111,000. One could argue that this gentrification project is not going at the pace desired. Slow and steady...

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Drought impacting Agriculture & Economy

Drought impacting Agriculture & Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Citing higher cheese prices, Colbert states it plainly:..."

 

Although in America today only about 2% of the workforce is involved in agriculture, crop cultivation is still tightly integrated within our economy affecting a much wider range of people and industries.  According to the US Department of Agriculture we our currently experiencing one of the worst droughts in our nation’s history rivaling the Dust Bowl of the 1930’s. On a national scale, prices in gas, meat, dairy and other products that depend on crops will likely increase. However, since the U.S is a major producer of crops such as wheat and corn, the global economic consequences of this will be felt around the world. How will an increase in food prices effect people in countries were a quarter or more of their income goes towards groceries? How will a decreasing agricultural yield effect economic and political stability around the world?  This is a humorous look at a very serious problem. 

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 30, 2012 8:48 AM
With fuel already a huge issue, now we will have the added costs of water shortage on our hands. It's an unfortunate deal, but cost is always passed on to the consumer. You can see it in many products today, smaller portion yet higher price. It shall be the same with anything in those regions effected by the drought.
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Using a Smartphone and ArcGIS Online

Using a Smartphone and ArcGIS Online | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Now that it is easy to gather tracks and waypoints on a smartphone and map them in a GIS, it provides a good opportunity to remind students about the importance of being critical of and paying attention to data. I recently went on a walk around a local reservoir and used the Motion X GPS app on my iPhone to collect my track and a few waypoints. I emailed the data to myself and added the GPX file to ArcGIS Online so I could map and examine the track. I made my results public and made it visible below to feature some teachable moments......"

 

What a perfect combination!  Students more and more have these fantastic computing devices that we often underutilize (or ban outright) in their education.  This article shows how to bring GIS and a student's smartphone together.

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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 10:20 AM
Mapping and examining your tracks of direction on the move, you can't get any more "real time" than that! And I have been witness to a change in school settings, in regards to cell phone use in school. I can remember before students had advanced cell phones, and cell phones were not allowed to be seen out of one’s pocket in a classroom. But now I am seeing cell phones being an advantage to classroom studies.