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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Create Your Own Map

Create Your Own Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States and Canada."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The map above represents where I have been (green) and where I have lived (orange).  Super easy, anyone can use this site to create a PNG file that maps out North America (maximum of 5 colors, including white).  For more on how to create your own, read here.  Canada, Alaska and Hawaii can be included as well.    

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:12 AM

create your own map is interesing because it allows you to visualize and share with others your own journey around the country in terms of residence and visits being in seperate colors. Compared to the size of the country I myself have only been to very few states. I have yet to go to Alaska, Hawaii, the Midwest parts, and much of the Western part of the country. I am convinced that extensive travel is something i will accomplish in the yeard ahead. For the professor himself he still has several more states to visit. It is propbable that he will visit many more in the years to come

Charles Adami's curator insight, November 18, 2013 6:52 PM

Students color code states involved in expedition. Louisiana Purchase , and US circa 1803.

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 9:40 AM

I took the liberty of using this site which was linked on my Professor's page to create my own map of travels within the United States! Green represents states which I've spent many nights, amber for states which I briefly passed through, and red for states I've never been to at all. I didn't include the map for Canada as well, but I've been to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Ontario primarily. I'm very into the idea of travel and intend to visit as many places as I can in my lifetime, but I have focused much of my journeys for the future into foreign countries. This map gave me the hint that I might want to focus homeward a bit more.

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Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese

Wedding, Gangnam Style: S. Korea attracts affluent Chinese | Geography Education | Scoop.it

South Korea's tourism ministry estimates that more than 2.5 million Chinese visitors spent an average of $2,150 per person in 2012, more than any other nationality. That's helping companies such as iWedding, which is the largest of the South Korean wedding planners hosting Chinese tourists, to flourish.


"Chinese look up to South Korea for its sophisticated urban culture, style and beauty," said Song Sung-uk, professor of South Korean pop culture studies at the Catholic University of Korea in Seoul. "Rather than visiting traditional palaces or shopping for antiques, they would rather go to Gangnam to experience state-of-the-art shopping malls."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: popular culture, South Korea, East AsiaChina, tourism.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 10:28 AM

Seems that the Chiese are skipping over their ally to head to South Korea for a better time.  Seems that international isolation really does have an effect on the domestic life, and toursim, in North Korea.  They really also want to just go shopping somewhere new and modern and see what just might be avaliable in their neighbor to the south.  Guess this time they won't be invading South Korea with an army, as in 1950, but with tourists.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 10:23 AM

I found this article very interesting because it seems so elegant for this new bride to have pictures takend and she has this new place where her and her husband are going to be getting married and then the article talks about where the best place is to go when these celebrations are happening. US Today talks about how it is not an elegant hillside or an ancient monument or even ruins that the newlyweds swarm to but the tony Seoul district made globally famous by South Korean rapper PSY's "Gangnam Style." "Helping shape that image is the popularity of South Korean cosmetics and fashion and the many South Korean stars whose looks are widely copied in China."

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Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets

Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a look at 3 billion tweets - every geotagged tweet since September 2011, mapped, showing facets of Twitter's ecosystem and userbase in incredible new detail, revealing demographic, cultural, and social patterns down to city level detail, across the entire world.

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this this great social media dataset, patterns of population density are immediately evident, with areas with great population densities not surprisingly representing the greatest concentration of social media usage.  On closer inspection though, the major transportation arteries (or in this particular map map of NYC, tourism districts) become much more visible than a population density map would suggest.

UPDATE: See also twitter's newest visualization of this dataset where they used digital elevation tools to show "height" to represent the tweets

 

Tags: visualizationsocial media, transportation, globalization, mapping, NYC, tourism.

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MelissaRossman's curator insight, August 30, 2013 7:37 AM

nice one

MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 7:37 AM
nice one
trampolinecalf's comment, September 26, 2013 11:50 PM
well
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Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Blue countries are more welcoming, red countries less. Where does yours rank?
Seth Dixon's insight:

The World Economic Forum compiled a report on global tourism and part of that was an estimation of the attitude of each countries' population toward foreign visitors--this map is a visualization of that data.  Why would some particular countries be more or less welcoming? What surprises you about this map?

 

Disclaimer: according to this article, there is much that is methodologically wrong with this map. 


Tags: tourism.

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Thomas D's comment, May 6, 2013 7:29 AM
I think this map of least and most welcoming countries to tourist is very interesting. I look at this through the American point of view and see that countries like Russia, Iran and Pakistan who are among the least welcoming states. These are all countries that we have had conflicts with throughout our countries history. I also find it interesting that the United States is such a neutral country towards tourism. A country that was based off of immigrants is no longer so welcoming to outsiders coming to our country. This could be due to the recent terrorist acts that have taken place within the United States in the past 15 years. Also just by looking at the map in a broader sense most of the countries that are unwelcoming are located in western Europe and Asia rather than anywhere else in the world.
Paul Beavers's comment, July 4, 2013 4:35 PM
Well the Chinese sure hide it well. I've visited there twice (once for a month) and I couldn't have been more welcomed. The people were the best part of both visits.
Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 4:42 PM

cool

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Super Bowl Is Largest Human Trafficking Incident In U.S.

Super Bowl Is Largest Human Trafficking Incident In U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When it came time for the Super Bowl, Clemmie Greenlee was expected to sleep with anywhere from 25 to 50 men a day.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There certainly is a dark side to large sporting events as this article on human trafficking makes perfectly clear.  The 'event economy' based on tourism (even without trafficking) also has some negative impacts.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:03 PM

This a very sad situation, I can only imagine, the torture and abuse this girls endure. This video should be play as super ball commercial, every year to bring awareness of what is going on behind closed doors. I bet they won’t play it, because we don’t like to hear about unhappy stories. Every year we get so caught up on the excitement and in our everyday life that we forget how bad other people are having it.

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The Top Ten places to visit in Africa

The Top Ten places to visit in Africa | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Africa has a lot to offer the adventurous traveller. We've compiled a list of the must-see places any trip should include.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are great iconic places of Africa in this Top 10 list  (and yes, I'd love to see Victoria Falls from above). 


Tags: tourism, Africa.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2:18 PM

Although Africa does not have the greatest economic structure, it has beauty throughout. Here are the top 10 locations to visit in Africa that will take your breath away!

Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 9:54 AM

I always have to re-scoop these when I see them for different regions, as followers will already know, it's a big desire of mine to see most countries in the world, and natural/ancient environments are my favorite.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:23 PM

Just like the rest of these scoops, this is filled with awesome vacation and tourist spots. This bridge overlooks a fabulous waterfall that everyone should get to see something like it in their lives.

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A Poacher’s Redemption

A Poacher’s Redemption | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Gettleman, The Times’s Nairobi bureau chief, reports on how Kenya’s wildlife conservation corps is learning from a reformed poacher how to counter the growing threat to elephants.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In Somalia, former pirates are helping to patrol the coasts to prevent piracy.  This idea of reforming and recruiting past criminals is also seen in Kenya as former poachers are trying to protect elephants that are essential to the local ecology as well as the tourism-driven economy.  In addition to the attached video is this article which expands on these issues.  


Tags: biogeography, tourism, Africa, consumption, resources, ecology, Kenya.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2:28 PM

A reformed poacher is now doing his part to keep the elephants safe. As the price of ivory skyrockets, elephants lives are threatened and endangered. However, as a reformed poacher, he is not new to the game and knows the odds and ends of what poachers do to attack. With his help, hopefully the growing threat will come to an end. 

Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 9:59 AM

You see this sort of thing all the time in crime dramas, the former criminal is let out to track down more of his or her kind. It's just a really smart move since they would know the methods best, and it's nice to see people redeem themselves and help the world rather than sit in punishment for years upon years.

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82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.


This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.

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Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 5:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 1, 2013 9:49 PM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 1, 2013 9:51 PM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
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Mixing Past And Present In Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea, once home to cannibals, still has an exotic aura. The local tourist economy caters to those notions, and visitors may see a hybrid of the traditional and the modern.


This story is an intriguing blend--we see traditional cultures engaging in the global economy. They have created two villages: a traditional one designed for tourism filled with emblems of their folk cultures, and another one where people work, live eat and play with various markers of outside cultural and technological influence.


"Tourists are taking pictures. They don't want to take pictures of those who are in Western clothes.  People who are in Western clothes are not allowed to get close to people who are dressed up in the local dressings."


Questions to Ponder: Which village do you see as the more "authentic" one? How can culture also be a commodity?


Tags: folk culture, tourism, indigenous, culture, economic, rural, historical, unit 3 culture, Oceania.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, December 5, 2013 7:59 AM

This NPR audio source reveals two totally different lives in Papua New Guinea.  There is one side that caters to tourism by showing the "old" Papua New Guinea.  This village promotes tourism and it has tours that show old, sort of primitive traditions in Papua New Guinea.  It is still important to the natives because it does preserve their past culture.  The villagers feel that the world is becoming so westernized that they cannot go back to the old ways of traditions such as cannibalism, wearing little clothing, etc., but when tourists travel to this village, those are the things they want to see.  The man in the audio source then traveled to another village where he witnessed how people of Papua New Guinea actually live, which is westernized.  I think that both villages are authentic.  One village represents their past culture and traditions and origins which is still important, and the other village represents globalization and the changes that the people of Papua New Guinea adapt to.  Culture can be a commodity because people such as westerners buy into what they think a country's particular culture is, even though that culture existed centuries ago and the culture has drastically changed since.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 5:18 PM

This pod cast shows the dichotomy of old and new.  The villagers earn a living being a living museum of their past culture.  But to do that they need to keep all modern influences away from the tourist village which leads to them living in a separate village nearby. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 11:56 AM

The tourists visiting Papua New Guinea enjoy visiting the villages where people are supposedly living in the past. I am sure some visitors still believe these villagers are still cannibals. People years ago once came here and told the ancient villagers to abandon their culture and leave their religion behind. Today, tourists are visiting and paying to see these villagers living in the past.   

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La Tomatina 2012

La Tomatina 2012 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
La Tomatina is a festival that is held in the Valencian town of Bunol, located inland from the Mediterranean Sea, that brings together thousands of people for one big tomato fight – purely for fun!


La Tomatina is a cultural festival in Spain that is world renowned for it's exuberance and playfulness.  This gallery of 26 images shows some of the dynamism and appeal to this extraordinary event where more than 40,000 people engage in the world's largest foof fight using upwards of 100 tons of tomatoes in the yearly food fight known as 'La Tomatina.'


Notice the signs for storing backpacks and luggage that are now pastered with tomatoes on the store in the background of the image.  These hastily-composed, informal signs are written in three languages (Spanish, English and Japanese).  What does this tell us about the festival?  Also, notice how the comments section revolves around the concepts of waste, poverty and consumption. 


Tags: Europe, foodtourism, seasonal, culture, unit 3 culture, consumption.

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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 12, 2012 12:03 PM

I find myself caught between respecting the practices of other cultures as I can’t not help but acknowledge that this is still very extravagant and wasteful although we in America are no better. This use of food can be seen globally as just another example of the widening depravation as undeveloped countries may view food solely for consumption while developed countries grow food for commerce with the notion that once you pay for it, it does not matter how you use it.
Nicholas Rose's comment, September 13, 2012 6:59 AM
This article is very interesting to say the least. The reason why is because culturally even this is the largest food fight in the world involving only tomatoes but it has been a critical cultural tradition in Spain for many years and will still become a tradition to Spain.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 25, 10:02 AM

Spaghetti anyone? La Tomatina is a large tomatoe fight held in Bunol. It is a cultural festival in Spain purely for fun. Thousands meet in the streets to throw tomatoes and through the pictures shown, one can only imagine how many tomatoes get thrown at this festival. The streets are flooded red!

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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:42 PM

It made sense for American Samoa to ask for the move even though it is US territory.  It is more closely linked with the economies of the China, Japan, Australia, New Zeland and South Korea.  For them to all be on the same day just makes sense.  You can coordinate things better if everyone is on the same day, financial markets and be in line when the trading day starts and ends.  Seems to me to make sense that they are on the same day as their main economic partners.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 2:42 AM

This line clearly needs to be redrawn.  It just does not make sense that it could be monday in one area and tuesday 50 miles directly south of it.  While the new dateline does not necessarily have to be perfectly straight, it should at least not go directly horizontal as it does now.  Whoever lies on the line must deal with whatever place they have been placed in, and not complain.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:05 AM

My class examined this and we agree that it makes sense that American Samoa would want to be those they do business with like Asia, Australia and New Zealand.  ALthough American Samoa is a US territory, it definately does more business with the countries who are nearby and therefore they should be pushed to the other side of the dateline.

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Why We Travel...

Why We Travel... | Geography Education | Scoop.it

So go 'read' some more (Extra credit for identifying the location)!

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Morgan Halsey's comment, September 8, 2012 7:13 AM
I really like this quote and it got me thinking. One who does not experience what other places are like can only base life off of what they know. They don't know how blue the water of the Bahamas is or how it feels to stare up at the Eiffel Tower. They haven't been able to see the different cultures of the world and how they act. They only know what they know because of what they've seen in pictures or heard from other people. This does not give them the knowledge that they need about other places.
Kendall Dickson's comment, September 11, 2012 6:21 PM
St. Augustine hit this saying out of the ball park. Sometimes when I try taking picutres of the sky or of a scene, I will delete the picture because it just isnt the same as in realy life. I really think that traveling gives people a reality shock when seeing new phenomena.
Lydia Blevins's comment, September 12, 2012 7:14 PM
What i think this quote means is that you may think you know a lot about the world but until you go and travel to different places you will not fully understand the world. I also think it means that there is so many different things to experience on earth.
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Water Equity in Tourism

Water Equity in Tourism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Tourism Concern fights exploitation in the global tourism industry. We are an independent, non-industry based, UK charity.

 

This is another way to conceptualize the geographic impacts of tourism.  Wealthy tourists from developed countries spend their money in less developed countries, creating a power imbalance within the local community between locals and tourists.  Local absolutely need the tourists dollars but these funds come and a social and environmental cost.  Tourists use far more local resources per capita than the local residents, one reason why some refer to tourism as an 'irritant industry.'  What other forms of social friction can arise from tourism?   For a more detailed response to this situation see this news article in the Guardian: http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2012/jul/08/fresh-water-tourist-developing

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World's Most Thrilling Airports

World's Most Thrilling Airports | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Or the world's most terrifying runways, depending on your perspective and sense of adventure.  Pictured above is the Matekane Air Strip in Lesotho.  It is too short to start flying the conventional way so you drop on a cliff until the aircraft starts flying...if that is not your kind of funmaybe some extreme tourism would suit you in your travels more.


Tags: transportation, tourism.


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Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 27, 2013 1:02 PM

Amazing !!!

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:09 AM

Most people are scared enough to even go on a plan much less having to deal with some of these runways. This horrid runways include high altitude, short runways or even 90 degree turns to even advance onto the runway. Pretty scary if i might say so myself. Im surprised the St Maartens runways didn make the list with its threat of hitting a popular beach in the local proximity.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:02 PM

Some of these airports look to me as if planes won't make it. The one in Portugal goes over mountains and trees and is very short. Flying can be terrifying as it is but landing on some of these airport can be more nerve racking. This raises a question, was this the only land area these countries had to build a runway? 

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China's Sustainable Cave Hotel Under Construction

China's Sustainable Cave Hotel Under Construction | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Construction has started on a cave hotel resort by Atkins that will nestle into the rockface of an abandoned water-filled quarry near Shanghai, China.

Once complete, the hotel will offer around 400 rooms, as well as conference facilities, a banquet hall, restaurants, a swimming pool and a water-sports centre.

The building will use geothermal technologies to generate its own electricity and lighting, while greenery will blanket a roof that extends just two storeys above the edge of the quarry.

 

Sustainability is integral to Atkins' design of this unique resort, built into an abandoned, water-filled quarry.

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 12, 2013 8:20 AM

It seems even the Chinese tourist industry is at the forefront of hotel construction. This place looking breathtaking.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 1:51 AM

China is a major topic this year, could be good.

Resort and Hotel Mythbusters's comment, September 9, 2013 11:08 PM
This sustainable hotel is one another impressive work that architecture has been done. The basic idea itself is impressive considering its built in a cave over a waterfall and 3 storeys of them were beneath the water. However, the most important thing is this hotel generates their own energy which is incredible considering most new hotel nowadays have to promote their sustainability in the future. We can't wait to see the hotel to be finish and ready to use.
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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The article leaves me with more questions than answers.  What do the residents think about the tons of tourists wondering through their winding streets?  The very idea of tourism to see poverty in situ in an authentic slum is riddled with power and cultural imbalances.  Why would wealthy tourists from the developed world want to more fully explore the slums in the developing world?  What do you see as the 'wrong' and the 'right' within this situation?   Is slum tourism ethical?

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 5:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 8:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 6:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America

The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
South America is a land of natural exotic beauty that will leave you speechless, a land of mystery and great historic importance. If you make a trip to the southern hemisphere, be sure to include these precious gems.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Beautiful Places! 

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Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 8:20 AM

A must-scoop for me since travel is a big plan of mine. #9 is high up on my list for the chance to climb the Andes. I''m a big hiker and already reached the summit of many mountains in the Northeast US, and even hiked portions of Mt. Etna. Both of these are nothing compared to the Andes, but these mountains were also relatively easy for me to climb, so a challenge would be welcome. The more extreme it is, the more interested I am. #6 calls to me also as I could potentially book a trip to Antarctica from there, and that's likely the easiest way I'd get there.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 7:41 PM

This top ten list highlights some amazing sights in South America. There are several locations with fantastic geographic features including: towering mountain ranges, volcanoes with hot springs, fantastic beaches, ancient hidden cities, unbelievable waterfalls, incredible metropolises, and of course the Amazon Jungle with its millions of animal species.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 11:03 AM

Attractions like these are what tourists go in search of. If you want to travel to beautiful places full of natural landscapes, South America is the place to go. The ruins that the water flows over gives it a special and magical touch. 

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Photographing Iconic Landmarks

Photographing Iconic Landmarks | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Oh, Machu Picchu, ancient city of the Incas, pride of Peru, must-see travel destination: You've never been so appropriately photobombed by a llama.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Millions of tourists have already taken a picture of Machu Picchu from this angle, and yet, tourists all want to replicate the iconic shot as for themselves--proof that they were there and had the full experience.  Iconic images are perfect for internet memes (and in this instance a photobomb) because there is a shared cultural understanding of what the picture should look like normally and inverting that provides the comic relief.  CAPTION THIS PHOTO IN THE COMMENTS SECTION. 


Tags: Peru, South America, tourism, images.


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Seth Dixon's comment, February 5, 2013 3:38 AM
You'll have to show me that picture this summer Kevin! My volleyball team is called the 'volley llamas' so this is our newest mascot.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 8, 3:48 PM

If a picture says a thousand words, how many words can be said of a photo-bomb? This picture of Machu Piccuhu offers great comic relief from the llama following travelers. This llama practically posed for the couple that journeyed further out to get away from other tourists.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 11:04 AM

Machu Picchu is a tourist attraction to say the least. People love going on adventures to ancient ruins and such. This would be a great place of historical cultivation for many people to see.

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The Great Mosque of Djenné

The Great Mosque of Djenné | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Great Mosque of Djenné, Mali, is a magnet for tourists, but it is increasingly difficult for locals to live a normal life around it.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This New York Times short video is an intriguing glimpse into some of the cultural pressures behind having the designation of being an official world heritage site.  The grerat mosque combined with the traditional mud-brick feel to the whole city draws in tourists and is a source of communal pride, but many homeowners want to modernize and feel locked into traditional architecture by outside organizations that want them to preserve an 'authentic' cultural legacy.


Tags: Islam, tourism, place, religion, culture, historical, community, Mali, Africa.

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Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)!

Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)! | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is more for the teachers than the students since this is most certainly not a current pop culture reference.  Still, what's better than an interactive map displaying the locations where Johnny Cash has been while listening to him sing "I've Been Everywhere?"  (Tech support: Use Google Chrome or Safari to play and ignore the finger).  

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Zoe Alexander's comment, December 3, 2012 9:06 PM
The map is missing Baranquilla, it's a city in Colombia
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Iconic Skylines

Iconic Skylines | Geography Education | Scoop.it

These skylines are not to scale, but are composite skylines to groups together the iconic representations of the particular cities into one.  Thanks to APHG teacher Ricard Giddens, here are some U.S. skylines


Tags: urban, Paris, London, place, tourism.

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Thomas Schmeling's comment, October 29, 2012 6:01 AM
How about one for Providence??
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Social Media and Place

Social Media and Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Facebook most social cities: People everywhere use Facebook to check in to places. Here you can see the 5 top hotspots of the most "social"cities.


Questions to ponder: What attributes do these commonly 'checked into' landmarks have in common?  Are you surprised that some are or are not on the list?


Tags: socialmedia, place, tourism, infographic, London, NYC, Paris.

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As Games Play On, London Quieter Than Expected

Just a few weeks ago, warnings were flying thick and fast that the Olympic Games would reduce London to chaos, jamming the capital's roads and clogging up its aging transport system.

 

The Olympic Games have had a very uneven impact on the various neighborhoods of London. Many businesses that cater to tourists on the western end of London have not seen the typical crowds for a regular summer, much less a summer that was so highly anticipated.  The majority of the neighborhood renovation projects were carried out on the East End.  So the question: "are the Olympics an economic success for London?" is not one with a simple, straightforward answer.   

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Experiencing World Regional Geography

Experiencing World Regional Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Two hundred countries and 20 times around the planet - a man's amazing journey in his Mercedes.

 

This 5 minute video is a glimpse into the life and travels of Gunther Holtorf, on a 23-year, 500,000 mile journey.  This man has experienced, lived and seen so many of the places, cultures and environments that we try to make come to life for our students as we study the wonderful world we live in.   

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Why Hosting the Olympics Is Bad for Cities

Why Hosting the Olympics Is Bad for Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Don't count on gaining much from your moment in the sporting sun.

 

Cities love the advantages of having the Olympics in town; the cultural prestige, the international publicity and the recognition as a globally significant city.  The tourism and economic impact is the rationale for so many expensive infrastructure projects, yet research indicates that economic boost during the Olympics is not always the boon that it is made out to be. 

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