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What Rio doesn’t want the world to see

"Rio is hiding poor people. See Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BRTlHFpBU "

Seth Dixon's insight:

This isn't news, but it isn’t just about Rio de Janeiro, since the World Cup and Olympics have already come and gone. Yet the urban planning designed for the world’s gaze remains.  Some strategies used were to create economic development and stimulate the local communities, but more often than not, the poor of the city and the poor communities cities were swept under the rug without addressing the issues that creating poverty with the city.  Many of the poor communities closest to Olympic venues were demolished without real viable housing options for the displaced residents.

 

Questions to Ponder: Can you think of other ways (of other examples) that city planning is used to hide the poor or the ‘less desirable’ parts of the city?  Why does this happen?  How should urban planning approach economic redevelopment, poverty, and community?   

 

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, neighborhood, economicplanning, urbanism.

 

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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 10:03 AM
Unit 6 - Uneven Economic Development
M Sullivan's curator insight, June 14, 10:46 PM
Urban planning violating Human Rights
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The Ever-Expanding Slums

"Slums lack:

  • Permanent housing
  • Sufficient space
  • Clean water
  • Sanitation
  • Personal safety
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is a slum?  Why do so many people around the world live in slums?  What are the largest slums in the world?  These are the questions that this video seeks to answer as the TestTube team tackles one of the more pressing issues of confronting urban areas in the developing world.   

 

Tagspoverty, squatter settlements, development.

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Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 2016 6:29 AM
Another GREAT resource to show to Geography students! 
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 2, 2016 12:29 AM

The liveability of urban slums in the developing world makes an interesting study linking access to services and facilities, community identity, social connectedness, environmental quality and safety. 

 

Follow an introduction to slums using this video clip and 8.11 with the following resources that investigate the impact of rapid urbanisation on the liveability of cities.

 

Slums are a consequence of urbanisation studied in more depth  in Changing Places (Stage 9) - consequences of urbanisation. Limit the study of slums to liveability issues in stage 4 or an introduction to factors influencing liveability. 

 

GeoWorld 7 NSW

Chapter 7: Liveability:Measurement and environmental factors 

7.6 Access to shelter

Chapter 8 Urban, rural and remote places

8.6 An urban world

8.7 Why go to town?

8.8 Large cities attract people

8.10 Skyscrapers and slums

8.11 Kibera slums and flying toilets

Geothink people live in cities - Figure 8.14.3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 13, 11:07 AM
unit 7
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Can these satellite images save lives? The U.N. thinks so

Can these satellite images save lives? The U.N. thinks so | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Stunning images taken from space put the world's crises into context.


U.N. satellite imagery has tracked the evolution of the camp since its creation. The exponential growth is remarkable.  The refugee camp is rapidly taking the shape of a real city — structured, planned and even separated into neighborhoods and subject to gentrification.


Tags: refugees, migration, conflict, political, warsquatter, urban, unit 7 cities, remote sensing, geospatial. 


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tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 2015 5:13 AM

Raises a number of serious questions.Not only about the middle East but about habitation,cultural development and resource distribution and deployment inequalities

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:00 PM

I definitely think that it would. It is impressive to see how a urban planning affected the land designed by the refuges. Within a few years through satellite imaging, we can witness and appreciate how  the Zaatarie refugee campus went from a few refugees to a total urbanized area receiving and distributed more than 85,000 refuges in the area. Urban planning plays a big role in regards to how display all populations. However, we have to take in consideration that when a massive population in one area is displayed, urban area is also relevant in terms of disciplines, public healthy, collaboration to live under a community rules. On other hand, natural disasters and destruction by war can wipe out entire cities within seconds. The satellite images were able to show the destruction that took place in the Syrian city of Hamas after natural diasters devastated the region and the wartorn afternmath of Gaza city. Natural disasters and war trigger a massive migration of refugees in search for better a life and opportunity.

Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:26 PM

This report refers to the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan which is experiencing rapid growth in population with 85,000 citizens and is even starting to look as a "city built form scratch". The reason geographers think that satellite imagery can save refugee lives is because it allows them to view areas of the camp in which they are unable to reach on ground. This information will help health workers pinpoint these certain hidden areas and tend to the people who are there. This use of satellite imagery centers around the camps rapid growth in population, making it quite a challenge to scale on ground. 

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Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City

Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As the sprawling Zaatari camp evolves into an informal city — with an economy and even gentrification — aid workers say camps can be potential urban incubators that benefit host countries like Jordan.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an intriguing article that explores the difficulties of forced migrations that arise from civil war, but it also looks at city planning as refugee camps are established to make homes for the displaced.  These camps have become into de-facto cities. The maps, videos and photographs embedded in the article show the rapid development of these insta-cities which organically have evolved to fit the needs of incoming refugees.  Size not investing in permanent infrastructure has some serious social, sanitation and financial cost, there are some efforts to add structure to the chaos, to formalize the informal.  Truly this is a fascinating case study of in urban geography as we are increasingly living on what Mike Davis refers to as a "Planet of Slums."  


Tags: refugees, migration, conflict, political, warsquatter, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities. 

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Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, July 13, 2014 11:06 AM

beautiful intriguing post telling the story of something I - personally - never considered. It pictures a new city growing, with not only basic needs, ...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:02 PM

APHG-U4

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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.


Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, narcotics, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:41 AM

unit 7

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:29 AM

I believe that absolutely no one is surprised that right before an international event, the hosting city is cracking down on its problem areas. I am skeptical of the Brazilin governments  promise to develop the long neglected Favelas. After Rio finishes hosting the 2016 Summer games, the government will once again neglect the Favelas. There will no longer be an incentive for the government to care about the favelas. The eyes of the world will be off the  city and things can return to normal. The only losers in this equation are the actual residents of these slums. Once again the promise of better days will ripped  from them. An added injury is that there informal economy will have been destroyed. While life in an informal economy is hard by any measure, it is still a way of making a living. The increased police presence will destroy that way of life and replace it with empty promises.  

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The article leaves me with more questions than answers.  What do the residents think about the tons of tourists wondering through their winding streets?  The very idea of tourism to see poverty in situ in an authentic slum is riddled with power and cultural imbalances.  Why would wealthy tourists from the developed world want to more fully explore the slums in the developing world?  What do you see as the 'wrong' and the 'right' within this situation?   Is slum tourism ethical?

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."


Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a compilation of 42 photos that highlight ideas of  population growth, urbanization and sustainability.  Pictured above is the favela Joaquim de Queiros, a hillside neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. 

 

Tags: population, images, unit 2 population.

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Roman M's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 12:49 PM

I saw the pictures. It is amazing how peoples back yards are all different. From water to dirt to garbage to no back yards at all. I was commenting on the fact with the population growth there is only one way to build and that is up. Then i saw the pictures of the High risers and how tall they were and so close together. It is a no wonder people live in a stressful environment. There is nothing like living in a wide open land lot with grass in Wyoming or Montana but that sure will change in the next 50 years.

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Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps

Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
RIO DE JANEIRO — Look at most maps of Rio de Janeiro. The beaches are easy to spot, as are the iconic ocean-front neighborhoods of Copacabana and Ipanema. In the middle is a vast forest.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A nonprofit organization run by current and former favela residents called Redes da Mare has started the first mapping program to systematically chart out the favelas for municipal governments.  We take for granted what having an address on a named street means in a modern society; it is a portal to public utilities, recognition with businesses and countless other social benefits.  Being left 'off the map' is synonymous with being left behind.  By finding their way on the city maps they are removing some of the social stigma that sought to treat them as if they did not exist.  


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, mapping

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Caterin Victor's comment, January 26, 2013 2:06 PM
Even the shanty-towns are beautiful in Brazil
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 3:06 PM

Being left off the map is ludicrous.  It should be surprising how many there are,what they pick for addresses, and population statistics. Hopefully this will also help them to get aid for poverty relief.

 

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Landfill Harmonic

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video shows that the human spirit of beauty and joy can come shining through from the poorest of places.  Slums are not new, but rapid population growth coupled with rural-to-urban migration patterns have led to an increasing amount of slums.  Despite all the stereotypical images of destitute poverty, slums can also be places with a strong vibrant communities with residents filled with innovation, hope and ambition.  For more on this organization, see their Facebook page.   


Tags: urban, squatter, poverty, South America, community, Paraguay.

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 2015 7:02 PM

Here in Cateura, Paraguay the inhabitants live on a landfill. the quote in the begining of the video says, "the world sends us garbage, we send back music", and it couldn't be more accurate than that. citizens recycle the garbage and sell it. it is very inspiring to see these people make the best of their situation, when a lot of people in America complain about traffic, and menial problems. While going through the trash a violin shell was found which sparked imagination. people started to make instruments like violins, flutes, and cellos. Cateura now has a whole recycled orchestra that makes beautiful sounds. hearing and seeing this wonderful progress from thrown away items, i wonder what Americans could produce with the trash that is thrown away here. with the highest point in RI the Johnston Landfill, we must have some good trash. 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:54 PM

It is amazing on how these slum residents have a brilliant idea in how to convert waste and trash into a gorgeous music. Imagination plays a giant roll into poverty. People need to subsist and imagination makes this possible by taking anything in their environment and having it serve a particular purpose. The high percentage of contamination in this pollute field is another pressing matter, however this issue does not stop residents from pursuing their dreams. Enhancing their skills in music by making musical instruments out of trash, allows them to escape from their problems. In this little town in Paraguay, poverty and excess waste is prevalent in this society, but the residents take advantage of their waste polluted fields and make musical instruments out of what they find in them. Furthermore, this ingenuity helps children and improves their overall quality of life.

 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:19 PM
After seeing this video, I have come to realize that here in America, we take so much for granted and complain about the smallest of things that do not go the way wanted, most Americans always want the newest and best of things whether it be cars, houses or electronics. Here in this video, you can just see the happiness these kids have and the joy that is brought to their lives using junk, literally junk. Their instruments are made from broken instruments or pieces of garbage picked from the landfill that could make the instruments. The fact that they are poor, live in slums and can have such joy in their lives, should be an eye opener for us here in America so that we stop taking our lives for granted and realize if people can be poor and find joy out of junk, then we can stop being selfish and take pride and joy in what we have even if it is not the newest and greatest thing on the market.
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‘Forgotten Neighborhood’ Underscores Growing Poverty of Gaza

‘Forgotten Neighborhood’ Underscores Growing Poverty of Gaza | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A United Nations report cites widespread shortages of food, water, electricity, jobs, hospital beds and classrooms amid an exploding population in an area of Gaza.


While most slums are symptomatic of issues that would be addressed by an economic and urban geography analysis, the slums of Gaza are different.  Many slum issues are tied to city politics, but in Gaza these slums are also connected to some of the larger geopolitical issues of the region.  


Tags: Political, urban, squatter, poverty, MiddleEast, economic, place, unit 4 political, unit 7 cities.

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Jasmine GreenTea's curator insight, February 24, 2014 11:27 AM

Parents in Gaza are not sending their children to school because they have either no money for books, school fees or materials for their school. In Gaza, there is an exploding population in an area and also, people are living in slum conditions and there is a widespread of shortage of food, water, electricity, jobs, hospital beds and classrooms. The fact that the people in Gaza, slaughter lame horses and uses its meat for kebabs because they could not afford beef or lamb, extended my thinking in new directions.

The population of people who are more fortunate is definitely more than those people who are living in poverty. Therefore, I wonder why are those people who are fortunate, not willing to lend a helping hand to these people in Gaza who are living in such bad conditions.

Kayla, Sean, and Max's curator insight, February 24, 2015 1:37 PM

Max

As the population of "The Forgotten Neighborhood" continues to grow exponentially, living conditions only continue to get worse and worse. People go without food, water, or basic services, making the conditions there practically unlivable. Due to corruption and mismanagement, much of the aid sent there to help gets used elsewhere, which causes living conditions to stay poor.

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Changing Real Estate Values

Changing Real Estate Values | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As Mumbai booms, the poor of its notorious Dharavi slum find themselves living in some of India's hottest real estate.

 

What do you think the future will hold for this slum neighborhood?  What will happen to the people that live there?  What will this place look like in 20 years?  What forces will create this change? 

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Living in the New Metropolis

Living in the New Metropolis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Documenting the megacities of our time....

 

Over half of humanity is living in cities and that statistic is likely to reach 70% by 2050.  Studying the urban environment, especially the 'megacities' (cities with populations over 10 million people) which are growing especially fast, becomes increasingly important.  This photo gallery of the worlds 23 megacites employs long exposure images, with highlights the movements and dynamism of the urban networks.  To see the gallery and this stunning image of Jakarta's rush hour traffic, visit: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2012/05/06/sunday-review/06METROPOLIS.html?ref=sunday#4   

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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 2014 11:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:48 AM

There is a lot of poverty and pollution in Dhaka. The demands for energy and water are high in Dhaka as well. I personally don't see how these people and migrants can live in such a polluted and dirty place and the reason why I can't imagine living in such a place is because I never have. I'm lucky enough to not experience poverty and I greatly appreciate  my life and home. Hopefully things improve in Dhaka and places like Dhaka. Hopefully there will be less pollution and poverty in the future any where in the world.

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Death toll doubles in Ethiopia garbage dump collapse

Death toll doubles in Ethiopia garbage dump collapse | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The death toll from a collapse at a landfill outside Ethiopia’s capital has risen sharply to 113, an Addis Ababa city official said Wednesday, as the country began three days of mourning for victims who were mostly women and children. Saturday’s collapse of a mountain of garbage buried makeshift mud-and-stick homes inside the Koshe landfill on the outskirts of the capital."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some geographies are uncomfortable to discuss because they expose some of the social and spatial inequalities that we wish weren't part of economic geographies.

 

Questions to Ponder: Why did this happen?  Why were so many people in the landfill?  

 

Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, development, urbanpoverty, squatter.

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The science of slums - Geographical

The science of slums - Geographical | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In an edited extract from his new book, Danny Dorling, professor of human geography at the University of Sheffield, argues that the idea of the population bomb is a fallacy and that the human population is checking its rise without the need for a grand plan
Seth Dixon's insight:

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 


Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:39 PM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:26 AM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:07 AM

mega cities 

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Squatters on the Skyline

"Facing a mounting housing shortage, squatters have transformed an abandoned skyscraper in downtown Caracas into a makeshift home for more than 2,500 people."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is one of my favorites in my placed-based geography videos collection.  This skyscraper was once a symbol of wealth, and in an incredible paradigm shift, it has now become is occupied by squatters. The lack of a vibrant formal economy and more formal housing leads to a lack of suitable options for many urban residents--especially with problems in the rural countryside. A complex web of geographic factors needs to be explained to understand this most fascinating situation. This NY Times article from 2011 still shows some great concepts on why informal housing develops and this PRI podcast gives us a 2014 update--that the Venezuelan government plans to clear the Tower of its residents.  


Tags: Venezuela, South America, squatter, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2015 2:13 PM

The squatters have made their own community complete with services and mini marts.  This tells me there is not enough affordable housing if the people of Caracas are willing to live in dangerous conditions.  Caracas government needs to build affordable housing or create better paying jobs so the citizens can spend the money in the community.  Its a cycle that needs everyone's participation to work to build a sustaining economy.  

Gene Gagne's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:42 PM

I found this article interesting

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 10:57 AM

we have talked about this in class. These people have learned to adapt and find ways to use electricity, running water. We have seen videos of other cities in countries with electrical cables and sewage water out in the open and people find ways to tap into it. The building reminds me of the abandon mills in R.I. where homeless people frequent to beat the harsh elements and sleep at night. They build small fires and use different areas for bathroom visits. The difference is our brick unoccupied mills find a way to catch fire and the city levels them to the ground. This is definitely unsafe but goes to show when you have no place to live its amazing how people find ways to survive and kind of build their own community. What I found disturbing is the people outside the neighborhood angry because the squatters took over the building. All of a sudden they complained about the safety of the squatters when in all reality they are safer because they are acting as a self community and know they need each other to survive. If the government or city officials or citizens of the neighborhood are that concerned then they can find a way to fix up the building.

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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a wide economic gap between the rich and the poor and in the spatial layout of urban settlements. Often an accompanying  tangible separation exists between the communities where these groups live.  These images (captured by a helicopter pilot with a keen eye for iconic and cultural landscapes in Mexico City) show neighborhoods in Mexico where this separation does not exist.   Collectively they are reminiscent of this famous photograph in Brazil that shows the uneasy juxtaposition of favelas and luxurious housing. 


Questions to Ponder: What are these neighborhoods like?  How are these two communities linked and separated?  Compare and contrast life on both sides of the fence.    


Tags:  housingeconomic, socioeconomicBrazil, urban, squatter, neighborhood, Mexico

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.

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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Most slums are systematically ignored by politicians and public utilities; squatter settlements are not built legally and they are treated as though they did not exist.  Mapping these communities makes them visible, literally putting them on the map can be an important step to legitimize the needs and requests of these poor residents and grant them greater access to public, municipal resources. 


Tagsmapping, GPS, podcast, GIS, poverty, squatter settlements, developmentAfricaKenya.

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:11 PM

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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LANDFILL HARMONIC: Inspiring dreams one note at a time!

A heartfelt & moving story of how instruments made from recycled trash bring hope to children whose future is otherwise spiritless.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've shared this video before, but this worthy project is now asking for assistance on kickstarter and I feel it merits reposting.  This video shows that the human spirit of beauty and joy can come shining through from the poorest of places.  Slums are not new, but rapid population growth coupled with rural-to-urban migration patterns have led to an increasing amount of slums.  Despite all the stereotypical images of destitute poverty, slums can also be places with a strong vibrant communities with residents filled with innovation, hope and ambition.  For more on this organization, see their Facebook page.   


Tags: urban, squatter, poverty, South America, community, Paraguay.

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 12:11 PM

This is really cool.  You would think that people living on a pile of trash would be really miserable and have a negative outlook on life, which in a way these kids probably do.  However they have found a way to bring joy to their lives and bring them closer together.  Going through the trash they are sometimes lucky enough to find actual instruments that have been thrown away, but more times than others only find pieces they can use.  Taking the pieces of trash that they find and turning them into instruments to make music is the highlight of most of these kids day.  They go to show that they can live in the worst of the worst but that doesn't mean that that will stop them from becoming something in life.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:59 AM

It is fascinating to see how a community living in very poor conditions have found a way to make their society and culture flourish. Where most residents make a living sorting through garbage, they have found a way to use that same trash to create instruments and an orchestra, adding rich culture to their community and giving the youth opportunities they would not have otherwise. It shows that while a community may live in less than ideal conditions, it is still possible to have a thriving culture.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:58 PM

this story is a wonderful example of how even in a horribly impoverished area people can still make art, and overcome massive hardships to chase something they truly want.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   


Tags: Bangladesh, water, pollution, poverty, squatter, planning, density, South Asia, development, economic, megacities.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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Favela Images

Favela Images | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, images, urban ecology.  

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:48 AM

These images of the favelas are both breathtaking and heartbreaking. Breathtaking in the sense that these aerial images show the scale of the entire neighborhood. You begin to get an appreciation for how large these favelas actually are. The amount of people living in this area is remarkable. The image is also extremely heartbreaking. I can only imagine the everyday problems and issue that the residents of these slums face. In the nations so called festive city, I see little reason for these people to celebrate. These are the forgotten people of the brazilin economic boom. They are the ones who the government would not like anyone to know about. Sadness and aw some up my reaction to this photo.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:57 AM
Just seeing images like this make me feel sad that there are people out there living the way they do. Favelas can be defined as the "slums" or ghettos. Favelas are built on hillsides and they tend to have very poor history with the police. Since the favelas are considered to be the slum area, the government provides very little assistance, and if you were to visit the favelas, you could find for example some very poor and dangerous wiring from the local people wire-tapping.
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:42 PM

This is an incredible favela village in South America. It shows how densely the population of slums are and how they are built up on the hillside. Most favelas are built on the side if the hills which are the most unstable portions because they can't afford to have a better place in the valley and away from the mudslide and avalanche areas. Great depiction of the slums.

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2014 World Cup: Will Brazil Be Ready?

ESPN Video: With the FIFA World Cup two years away, will Brazil be ready to host soccers premiere event?


This short sports documentary (12 minutes) looks at some of the socioeconomic and urban planning issues that are a part of the logistics for a country to prepare for a sporting event on the magnitude of the World Cup.  The discussion of demolitions in the favelas (squatter settlements) is especially intriguing.  Major sporting events of this magnitude that last for two weeks can reshape local geographic patterns for decades.  


Tags: sport, Brazil, planning, squatter.

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 1, 2013 5:11 PM

I know my soccer, and I know Brazil knows its soccer considering the country has one of the richest histories in the world.  The nation eats, sleeps, and breathes the beautiful game and to host a World Cup right now is immaculate timing.  Some of the best players (possibly ever) in the world would be playing next year, all from star-studded nations.  The forecast for this spectacle will surely be one of the best in history, but that's if it all goes to plan.  There's been many videos and articles of Brazil coming into more problems than solutions.  Repairing and even building new stadiums have set back schedules and have even angered many locals.  In some cities, there have been cases of gentrification, places such as favelas have fell victim.  Being such a passionate fan of the sport, it's almost upsetting that all of these people are being misplaced to house the tournament which has been anxiously waited on since 2010.  The main picture says it all with the three hands covered in blood...  A nation which cares so much about a sport, where it is a way of life and prosperity, is in fact doing more harm than good in some areas.  In the end I hope Brazil can get back on schedule, and leave as little people harmed in the process so the world can enjoy one of the greatest sporting events come summer of 2014.

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:16 AM

The World Cup is getting closer and all eyes are on Brazil. The Favelas are seeing the worst of it. To improve their country for it's soon to be influx of tourists, the Favelas are going through practically forced renovations. Not to mention safety hazards in Brazil are being pushed to the limits with the building anf remidelling of the soccer stadiums. Just last month 2 construction workers part of the rebuilding were killed by an accident. The question is especially true. Will Brazil be ready? Soccer fans around the globe sure hope so.

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Infographic: Palestinian homes demolished

Infographic: Palestinian homes demolished | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Report by an Israeli non-governmental organisation says 2011 was a record year for Palestinian displacement.

 

This infographic comes from the group Visualizing Palestine. This corresponds with the UN's recent statement that Gaza 'will not be liveable by 2020' given Israeli policies.

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Nic Hardisty's comment, September 4, 2012 12:16 PM
What a powerful infographic. To think that the international community (in large part) has idly watched 160,000 Palestinians become homeless, with little more than a few harsh words, is staggering. While these displacement policies are not exclusive to Israel, Israel does stand as the most public modern example of this. This problem transcends race, ethnicity, culture, or religion- it is simply one group dominating and subjugating another, and these actions should be recognized and condemned by global community.
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Protest over Haiti slum eviction

Protest over Haiti slum eviction | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Residents of hillside shanties above the Haitian capital Port-au-Prince protest against plans to clear their homes for a flood-protection project.

 

Even before the earthquake, Port-au-Prince was a city filled with slums.  The earthquake exacerbated so many of the urban, economic and environmental issues.  This eviction of the flood plains has class implications as the poor feel that they are being unfairly targeted in plans to improve the city. 

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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:08 PM

Geography and geographical events plays a great role in shaping the course of human civilization, and the 2010 Haitian earthquake is no exception. The devastation that occurred as a result of the earthquake has had severe political and economic consequences for the Haitian people and government, in part because the nation is the poorest in the Western Hemisphere. Despite Western aid, thousands of people have yet to relocate so safer areas or find new homes. This example of the dismantling of slums is a sad story, where the government refuses to allow citizens to live there, but cannot offer them somewhere to go. Despite the government citing safety concerns for the dissolution of the slums, many poor citizens feel that it is a gentrification plan and that they are being unfairly targeted- it would be interesting to see if richer Haitians are allowed to remain in similar areas, which would totally undermine the "safety" argument held by the government. Thousands of Haitians again find themselves homeless, adding to a legacy of devastation and human suffering left by the 2010 earthquake. Geography: 1, Humanity: 0.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:16 PM

While I can understand why the government feels the need to assert this project, the talk about the poor always being targeted struck a cord. The government hasn't been able too supply stable housing as it is for the recently displaced Haitians so why would these people believe that they would replace their homes? In one of my recent scoop its Mexico talked of lessons that need to be followed and one of them was " lesson the corrosive affects of a general lack of trust". I would have to say that Haiti could benefit from working on this.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 10:53 AM

on the one hand the government has a point. the neighborhood which they plan on destroying is at risk, and those people would be better off living somewhere else, but on the other hand they must provide housing in exchange if the residents cannot afford to get new housing for themselves when the time comes to move.

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Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic

Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Jakarta's traffic is legendary and locals have now become experts at finding ways to get around the jams, with some even making money out of them.

 

The population of Indonesia is heavily concentrated on the island of Java, and the capital city of Jakarta faces a tremendous strain on it's transportation network.  This video show that resourceful people will find inventive ways to make an unworkable situation manageable. 

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:35 PM

The amount of traffic in Jakarta is staggering and the traffic itself has built up a business of making commuting to work easier. What is troubling is that the government hasn't made enough of an effort to fix the problem of traffic in its largest and most economically viable city. If Jakarta wants to keep growing the government has to step in and find a way to make getting to work realistic for Indonesians.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 9:38 PM

The traffic in Jakarta is insane, to be in a constant standstill on your way to work is unreal. The reporter in the video says that if the city of Jakarta continues on its current path, it could be "in a state of Paralysis" which for an entire city is not good. The traffic has, for some, become a way to make money, illegally but money nonetheless.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:01 PM

Humans instinctively look to profit when the situation arises, this is one of those situations. The government implemented regulations that barely seem to manage the traffic jams, i.e. having 3 people per car. Since people do have to work and may not always be able to meet the requirements, others have started making a living as a “jockey,” an individual who offers to ride in a car so the 3 people limit is met. Doing this is considered illegal. Yet, there aren’t good enough jobs for people to work (otherwise they won’t be a jockey) and those who do work can’t seem to always follow the rule without it harming there work life.  Plus, more police now turn their attention towards these people thereby deterring them away from their other duties. I realize that the state probably never intended these consequences to happen, but now that it is I really wonder just how useful this law really is. One thing is certain though, without better planning or economic innovation by the government, the jams will continue to happen.

 

I find it odd that the people keep staying despite the major traffic problem. As one interviewee mentioned. I guess as long as you can find ways to stay productive and still receive enough compensation, the time spend in traffic isn't enough of a hassle for them. As someone who has enough economic opportunity with far less wait time in traffic though, I would find this situation unbearable. Clearly, this isn't that case though. So, I am not sure of the immediate solution. As we learned in class, the government tried transmigration. This just lead to more problems. It was then suggested that the type of opportunity. If that is the case though, what should the government do now? Waiting for a more natural economic opportunity to get the people out of Jakarta won't happen quick enough to curb the increasing population growth. Therefore the strain on the infrastructure will continue because the population's carrying capacity is exceeded. Whatever the answers, I think this would be a great case study for urban planning and the impact raising car dependency has on a society as this driving nightmare shows just how important planning is with more cars.