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D.C. Votes Overwhelmingly To Become 51st State

D.C. Votes Overwhelmingly To Become 51st State | Geography Education | Scoop.it
District of Columbia voters passed the referendum Tuesday with nearly 80 percent in favor. Congress, which will ultimately decide the fate of the federal district, is not expected to approve it.

 

Voters in the District of Columbia passed a measure on Tuesday in favor of petitioning Congress to become a state in the union.

79 percent of voters cast votes in favor of the ballot measure, which splits the district into a residential state with a small federal district in the middle of it for government buildings and monuments, as we have reported.

The newly approved measure had four parts:

  1. agree that the District should be admitted to the Union as the State of New Columbia
  2. approve of a Constitution of the State of New Columbia to be adopted by the Council
  3. approve the State of New Columbia's boundaries
  4. agree that the State of New Columbia shall guarantee an elected representative form of government.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: Why do the residents of the District of Columbia want to change the legal status of the District to a state?  Why might some states and politicians NOT want to see a 51st state?  What is needed in the United States to admit a new state (Puerto Rico is still a possibility to become the 51st state)?  

 

Tags: political, sovereignty, autonomy, Washington DC.

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Why Somaliland is not a recognized state

Why Somaliland is not a recognized state | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"SOMALILAND, a slim slice of Somali-inhabited territory on the southern shore of the Gulf of Aden, ticks almost all the boxes of statehood. It has its own currency, a reasonably effective bureaucracy and a trained army and police force. But it has yet to receive official recognition from a single foreign government in the years since it declared independence in 1991. To the outside world, it is an autonomous region of Somalia, subject to the Somali Federal Government (SFG) in Mogadishu. Why is it not a state?  Throughout the post-independence era, geopolitics in Africa has tended to respect 'colonial borders', i.e. the borders laid down by European colonial powers in the 19th century. Across the continent, there have been only two significant alterations to the colonial map since the 1960s: the division of Eritrea from Ethiopia, in 1993; and South Sudan from Sudan, in 2011."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Somaliland is a 'pocket of stability in a chaotic region.' The global community fears that granting recognition to a Somaliland might led to further devolution, even if the unrecognized government is functioning.  This is an excellent article from the Economist that demonstrates some of the key requirements to be a state, political and regional geography.  For another example of political geography of aspiring states, here is an article about the limited prospects of a future Kurdish state.      

 

Tags: devolutionpolitical, states, sovereignty, autonomy, unit 4 political, Somalia, Africa.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 19, 2015 1:35 PM

unit 4

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 19, 2015 1:35 PM

unit 4

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:55 PM

Like many new developing countries, it is hard to overcome the hardships to prove that you deserve to be recognized as a new nation. Being recognized as a true nation means that there is political and economic stability within a country. The area where Somaliland is located is very unstable. Its parent nation, Somalia is very unstable. For example, in Somalia, there are pirates who hijack mariners and take them and the vessel hostage. Stability within a country is a major aspect for the international community to look at to recognize new countries.

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22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures. These photos of different national borders around the world show you how both friendly and hostile nations like to fence off their turf.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Borders can make for some striking manifestations of power on the landscape.  On the other hand as seen in this picture of Slovakia, Austria and Hungary, friendship and cooperation can also be inscribed into the landscape.  There are some great teaching images in this gallery. 



Tags: border, political, territoriality, sovereignty,  images, land use, landscape.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:38 AM

Unit 4

Level343's curator insight, June 1, 2015 3:00 PM

Now that's cool!!

Dwane Burke's curator insight, June 3, 2015 6:16 PM

What do these say about the world?

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video (like part 1) shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video) on these complex borders:


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.

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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:40 PM

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 2015 9:13 PM

Borders seem to be a problem whether you live in one continent or another, everyone wants power and control but not everyone can gain it. This video focuses and goes into depth about enclave and exclave borders, showing the irregularity of the borders in different areas that causes conflicts and problems. An example of a problem that the citizens have to deal with is that some villages can not leave due to the road blocks due to the borders. I can not imagine not being able to leave a certain area for all that time, I would go insane and I imagine those people are as well. International borders power has to be split somehow and not everyone can always come to an easy decision because parts of the land are claimed but the people do not have any control of it. Irregular borders cause more trouble than they are worth in my opinion. The final interesting fact about this video was that you learn that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are the two locations that have the most irregular border, these places must have the most conflict and problems. These borders are in places such as Germany, South Asia, China, Belgian, Sweden and Central Asia.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 5:17 PM

A fascinating look into the complexity of borders. It is always important to keep in mind when looking at maps that the borders are neither permanent or defined as it exists in reality. Borders on world maps are rough estimations of what the borders actually are for they can't depict precise details on such a large scale. Furthermore regional/local maps sometimes do not whether as to conform to the border misconception unfortunately. In Central Asia as defined int he video the border were primarily a result of the Soviet Unions attempts to divided ethnic minorities reducing their power (primarily Stalin). As a result the countries after the collapse proceeded to claim the ethnic groups which created enclaves within each-other. As long as these groups are on peaceful terms this kind of thing isn't an issue. Unfortunately it does make the peoples lives in the enclaves slightly more difficult due to having to cross the border twice to see the rest of your country. This kind of thing was even done to the Jews in the first century AD who like the Russians wanted to eliminate or at least reduce attempts at revolution by the local populace. Hopefully Central Asia has or will make the lives of these enclaves easier.

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How New Countries Gain Independence

"Secession movements seem to be everywhere: from the Kurds in Iraq, to pro-Russian Ukrainian separatists, to Scotland's aim to break up the UK. How does secession actually happen? Let's look back to South Sudan's successful secession effort to see exactly how new countries gain independence."

Seth Dixon's insight:

What does it take to actually secede from a country?  This video takes the example of South Sudan to highlight the necessary requirements to successfully secede and then gain full independence. 


Tags: South Sudanpolitical, sovereignty, Africastates, unit 4 political.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:27 AM

How New Countries Gain Independence

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 23, 2015 7:06 PM

For a region to be able to succeed as an independent country, it must fulfill a series of requirements. In the case of Catalonia, Spain, it is far from what citizens in that area want to pursue, even when Catalonia is one of the richer regions in Spain. There are many factors that inhibit Catalonia from achieving its status as an independent country such as economic, political and cultural issues. With Spain’s current economy, it would be almost impossible for Catalonia to support itself as its own nation. In addition, if Catalonia gains its independence from Spain, it would not be able to be a part of the United Nations (UN). Language would prove as another obstacle for Catalonia as their combination of French and Spanish is not the official dialect of the region. Cultural assimilation would be difficult as Catalonians would have to transition and adapt Spain’s vascos and gallegos to a version of their own. However, centripetal forces in Catalonian citizens unify them as strong communicators within their region in order for them to promote and retain their distinct cultural identity.

As the video emphasizes how to gain independence; Catalonia does not qualify to achieve independence as it fails to meet some of the characteristics such as an “established group, marginalization, [and] economic stability.” However, as Spain’s economy begins to weaken, Catalonian citizens can take this opportunity to work towards their goal as being an independent entity from Spain

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Scotland's Decision

Scotland's Decision | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From Catalonia to Kurdistan, nationalist and separatist movements in Europe and beyond are watching the Scottish independence referendum closely.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This issue reverberates on many different scales.  As the video embedded in this article demonstrates,  Scotland's choice on September 18th would obviously impact the local region as some seek to use Scottish history as a rationale to reshape the current political and cultural identity of the region.  Some of the votes are already in and Scottish independence would not only have the potential to reshape the UK and EU, but it could also add some fervor to the various other separatist movements around the world, such as Catalonia.  


Tags: devolutionhistorical, supranationalism, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 2014 11:36 AM

Scotland, the site of nationalist and separatist movements, is one to watch as they vote. What the ramifications would be are yet to be seen

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 3:01 PM

It is interesting to see how globalization does as much to bring us together as it does to rip us apart. The exchange of ideas, goods, and people has hugely impacted the lives of everyday citizens and the nations that they call home, where divisions among people are felt more keenly as the competition in today's global economy grows stronger. Catalonia, the region that has done much to keep the economy of the Spanish nation afloat, and Catalans are eager to shed the "dead weight" they feel they are carrying; the Basque region has long since demanded its independence, and we have already seen the fracturing of the Balkans. In some instances, perhaps separation is for the best. However, I feel like these movements are the result of knee-jerk reactions to the current economic climate and deep, underlying hatreds that have no place in the current world order. Spain has been one nation for hundreds of years, as has the United Kingdom; to suddenly dissolve these unions in the name of century-long feuds seems not only unnecessary, but almost child-like. There is enough hatred in the world- why let us continue to divide amongst ourselves when history has shown that people in these regions can coexist and can consistently pull through these difficult periods. It is one thing to be proud of being Scottish- it is another to ignore the economic and political realities of what Scottish independence would bring for its people for the sake of this nationalist sentiment. I, for one, was relieved to see Scotland vote to remain a member of the UK. Separatist movements across the continent have been quieted, if only for another few years.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:16 AM

The Scottish vote for independence would have broken up a modern United Kingdom. Many Scottish folks feel that it is time to separate from a parent country where there are many other countries that are involved. Becoming independent is not an easy task. There has to be a vote and a strong position for those separatists to succeed in getting a victorious vote.

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Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Canada, Russia and Denmark (Greenland) are all seeking to expand their maritime claims in the Arctic.  Globally speaking, the retreat of Arctic sea ice can be seen as a unmitigated disaster, but disasters for the many can open up new economic opportunities for the few.  When trapped under ice, extracting resources is cost prohibitive, but the melting sea ice will make the Arctic's resources all the more valuable (including the expanded shipping lanes).  This fits in with the APHG new course outline which includes political ecology (the study of the political and economic principles controlling the relations of human beings to one another and to the environment).
 

Tagseconomic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, unit 4 political, Arctic, climate change, political ecology.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:19 PM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

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What is a part of the United States?

Seth Dixon's insight:

While identifying most of the territory that is a part of the United States is fairly straightforward, the interesting political geography is in discussing the places that aren't straightforward, such as American Samoa, Puerto Rico and Palmyra Atoll. 


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, CGP Grey.

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, August 17, 2014 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:09 PM

I honestly feel like we are never taught about these areas ever in US schools. We are always drilled about the 50 states and that's it. I would be interested in learning the history behind why this is still the case and what is keeping our government from considering them part of the states. The fact that they wont even consider American Samoa's citizens is a disgrace.

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Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled

Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, most world political maps aren't telling you the whole story. The idea that the earth's land is cleanly divvied up into nation-states - one country for each of the world's peoples - is more an imaginative ideal than a reality. Read on to learn about five ways your map is lying to you about borders, territories, and even the roster of the world's countries."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a nice article to get students to look past the officialness of a world map to explore some of the complexities that make contemporary political geography so compelling.  In a nutshell, this article discusses 5 major themes:

  1. Missing countries
  2. Incomplete control
  3. Undefined borders
  4. Disputed territories
  5. Territorial seas


Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 23, 2014 6:32 PM

Amazing stories on the World's changing Geopolitical status. Current stories about disputed borders, unrecognised territories and  newly declared nations.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:41 PM

Nunca é "Toda a Verdade" ... 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:49 PM

APHG-U1

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Love 'em or hate 'em - Britain's rocky relationship with the EU

Love 'em or hate 'em - Britain's rocky relationship with the EU | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The United Kingdom's relationship with the EU - or, in political parlance, 'Europe' - has long been one of the most divisive, emotive issues in British politics."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The beginnings of the European Union are rooted in the aftermath of WW II, with Europe exhausted from war many politicians wanted to unite European countries in a way that would make war with each other impossible.  The United Kingdom, though has had a complicated with the EU, sometimes (and for certain issues) wanting greater European integration to strengthen their regional position and at other times have resisted regional collaboration for fear of losing national autonomy.  This is very over-generalized, but this BBC article gives a nice historical perspective on the rocky relationship of between the two.  


Tags: Europe, supranationalism, currency, economichistorical, sovereignty, UK.

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 19, 2015 2:41 PM

This article shows that the United Kingdom is far different than its mainland European counterparts.  Many Europeans (especially the French) often criticize the UK, but this can be contributed to the long standing historical "misunderstandings" between the two countries.  Another fact that the article hits on, that makes Great Britain so much different than the rest of Europe, is the large overseas empire the nation controlled at one point in its history.  The UK is used to being on its own against continental European powers (Napoleon's France, Hitler's Germany, and the Spanish Armada to name a few).  Because of the UK's culture as well as its geographic location, the country has come to be vastly different than a majority of Europe and because of this resists becoming a full member of the European Union.  The country feels it is safer on its own than joining the Eurozone economic system.  Because of its history and location, the UK is in many ways closer to the United States than many countries in Europe.  It seems like until the "EU question" is resolved for good in Great Britain it is not going away any time soon.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 3:11 PM

If there is a more obvious example of geography shaping national politics, I have yet to come across it. The UK has long regarded "the continentals" as an alien race, filled with backwards and strange practices considered unseemly to the British people. This is very much a result of the UK being an island nation; cultural and political diffusion have always taken longer to take hold there as a result of its separation from the rest of Europe; British culture is uniquely "British," in even more of a sense than the cultures of the rest of Europe. English is as unrelated to any other European language as possible. Separated from the rest of the continent, it has always remained relatively aloof from the cultural and political pressures of the rest of the continent, which was only sharped during the Second World War. The British look across to the Atlantic in times of trouble, towards the United States, rather than across the channel to its fellow European nations. Intense pride in its long history of global dominance allows for many British citizens to view themselves as being "above" the political and economic cooperation now being sought in the European Union, reflected in British insistence on maintaining a separate currency. Resistance to forging closer ties to the continent has always been a feature in British politics, but the reality of globalization makes this isolationist sentiment obsolete and backwards. Refusing to move forward with its neighbors, the UK is in danger of falling further behind.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 4:19 PM

that the British have issues with mainland European countries. England [at least] has fought wars against most of them. that some tension would remain after a peace that has lasted one twentieth of the time that whoever lives in Britain has been fighting the people who live on  the continent.

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Countries inside Countries: Bizarre Borders

Seth Dixon's insight:

CGP Grey's distinctive style helps to contextualizes some of the more odd and complicated parts of the Earth (but some find the rush of facts disorienting). If you want another example, watch Bizarre Borders, part 2 which focuses on the complexities of the US/Canadian border. 


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, CGP Grey.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, May 18, 2014 2:52 PM

Talk about landlocked!  How would you form policy for a country that is completely surrounded by another country?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:02 PM

APHG-U4

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:30 PM

nature, meaning, and function of boundaries - The most common boundaries are nation's borders. This video shows many landlocked or mostly surrounded states, that don't decisive as much freedom as states with many neighbors or open borders. These surrounded states value their borders and boundaries, because even if they are smaller or do not have as much freedom, they have their own state that they rule that is all theirs. The function of these borders as boundaries are to mark the edges of their state and to keep other states out.

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How Many Countries Are There?

Seth Dixon's insight:

What makes a country a country?  There isn't just one definition that is universally excepted as to what a country is; that make the first question even harder to answer.  Exploring these terms though is incredibly geographic and highlights some of the lesser known but fascinating places that are mired in geopolitical quandaries.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, CGP Grey.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:12 PM

This is one of those frequently asked questions in Geography class that sometimes results in increased confusion. The maker of this video has summed it up nicely.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:44 AM

What makes a country a country is if they play by the rules, of other soverin nations on a global scale and follow the rules. Most countries recieve taxes from their citizens, have a military and a recognized as a soverin. Not every body of land is a country but are also properties controlled by other countries. There are countries in the South Pacific. In North, South America, Europe, and Asia, and bevcause of politcal geopgrahpy nations sizes are changing often and new countries are usually created from theis process

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:44 AM

193....except........

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Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video and article briefly show the reasons behind the current tension between Spain, NATO allies and fellow EU members.  The deeper, underlying issues though are all fundamentally rooted in the complex local political geography.  As an exclave of the UK on a peninsula connected to the Spanish mainland that controls access to the Mediterranean Sea, there is naturally going to be friction over this unusual political configuration. Spain, in what the chief Minister of Gibraltar calls "sabre-rattling," is flexing its muscles and considering using their border and airspace as a political leverage.  Spain is upset that Gibraltar has created an artificial reef in waters that their fishermen use.  Spanish fisherman have recently condemned the escalating political rhetoic.


Questions to Ponder: Why are both parties politically and culturally invested in this piece of territory?  What challenges are there for a small exclave when neighbors aren't friendly?  How does Spanish and British suprantional connections impact this issue?


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, Spain, Europe, autonomy.

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megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:37 AM

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 10:55 AM

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:59 AM
unit 4
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Countries Rush for Upper Hand in Antarctica

Countries Rush for Upper Hand in Antarctica | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For decades to come, Antarctica is supposed to be protected as a scientific preserve. But an array of countries are eager to assert greater influence.

 

TagsAntarcticaclimate changepoliticalresources, sovereignty.

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Argentina judge orders asset seizure of Falklands oil firms

Argentina judge orders asset seizure of Falklands oil firms | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A judge in Argentina orders the seizure of assets of firms drilling for oil around the Falklands, but it is unclear how it can be enforced.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Are they the Falklands or Las Malvinas?  It's not just a simple linguistic translation but also a statement of territoriality and geopolitical recognition in this festering situation.  For a great teaching resource on the historical ebbs and flows in this longstanding dispute between Argentina and the UK, see the second slideshow in this series of  AP Human Geography talks that was given at NCGE two years ago.   


Tags: Argentinaborders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

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ed alvarado's comment, July 4, 2015 12:31 AM
Thats superior
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Who Owns Antarctica?

Seth Dixon's insight:

If there is one thing that the modern political order can't stand it is letting unclaimed land remain unclaimed...even if it covered in frozen ice.  See some of the competing claims (and international agreements) on the political status of Antarctica.  Click here to see a similar analysis on competing claims over the North Pole.    


TagsAntarcticaclimate changepoliticalresources,watersovereignty.

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Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 2015 3:48 PM

With Antarctica being the coldest, driest, and most isolated continent on earth, it is surprising that 51 different countries own pieces of land on it. As of now, the lands there can only be used strictly for scientific research, but I presume that treaty will not be in effect forever. Hidden resources yet to be discovered and future technology and is bound to give us some reason to permanently settle in this barren land someday. Discovering oil or minerals would be a good bet, as it was a leading factor in causing Dubai to form in the Arabian Desert, or the city of Perth in Western Australia. A healthy fishing industry could even help support future economies there. While weather has always been an important factor in human colonization, it does not make a place totally inhospitable. If economies can form in places like Barrow, Alaska and Longyearbyen, Norway, I don't see future  settlements in Antarctica as an impossibility.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 25, 2015 5:20 PM

In reality, no one own Antarctica for now. However, it is governed under the Antarctica treaty of 1959.  There are a few reasons why no one has been claimed Antarctica, one being that is has extremely cold temperatures that drop to -122 °F. The continent also has a vast amount of thick ice that is 3 miles deep and covers its surface. In addition, it would be very costly to explore these regions and difficult to build infrastructure and transport food due to the cold temperatures and frozen seas. The Antarctica treaty of 1959 is an international agreement which states that no one cannot own the Antarctica. However, some countries have claimed some part of Antarctica. These designated areas are only to be used for scientific research purposes. Also, since an international agreement has been putted in place, Antarctica cannot be used for military purposes. The agreement also stresses freedom of scientific investigation but prohibits nuclear testing and waste disposal in Antarctica. This research has helped scientists discover new truths about global problems, climate change, and geology. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:16 PM

It will be interesting to see what happens to Antartica as the climate shifts and continues to get warmer.  What is under the frozen tundra?  Will it be something of a natural resource or mineral?  I think this is when the fight will get real about the slice of pie and how much each has.  

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Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Denmark is now being more assertive in their claimsWhy is this happening now?  As climate change threatens polar ice caps, some see the receding ice as an economic and political opportunity.  Canada, Russia, Denmark (Greenland) and the U.S. are all seeking to expand their maritime claims in the Arctic.  When trapped under ice, extracting resources is cost prohibitive, but the melting sea ice will make the Arctic's resources all the more valuable (including the expanded shipping lanes).  Even a global disaster like climate change can make countries behave like jackals, ready to feast on a dead carcass.  For more, read this National Geographic blogpost.  


TagsArctic, economic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, unit 4 politicalclimate change, political ecology.

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Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 2015 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 7:26 PM

In my opinion, I don't understand how the United nations can be seen as an entity that, essentially, controls who would have rights to a place like the North Pole(technically, not owned by anyone).  I, naively, understand the basics of the U.N.  In short, it is an organization that was formed, post-WW I or II, as a governing board for world-issues.

 

 With that being said, how can they believe that their "law" is the all-powerful one?  If I'm a leader of a country who is not a member of the U.N., do I really care what they say?   I just find it odd that this narrator speaks about the issue while holding the U.N. as a supreme authority.  I know that this video is just a quick fun type of video but it leaves me with wanting to hear the perspective of a non-U.N. member.  But a very interesting topic, none the less.

 

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The Most Complex International Borders in the World

"In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some of my favourites."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video):


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.


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ELAdvocacy's curator insight, October 3, 2014 9:40 AM

There are so many reasons our immigrant students come to the United States.  Some stories are so complex and painful it can be extremely difficult for Americans to understand.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 3, 2014 10:21 PM

Interesting!

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:39 AM

The Most Complex International Borders in the World

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."

Seth Dixon's insight:

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

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Donut Holes in Law of the Sea

Donut Holes in Law of the Sea | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Sovereignty over land defines nation states since 1648. In contrast, sovereign right over the sea was formalised only in 1982. While land borders are well-known, sea borders escape the limelight."

Seth Dixon's insight:

These maritime borders mark the economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line.  This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).  This interactive map of the EEZs also shows the 'donut holes,' or the seas that are no state can claim that no state can claim.  Given the number of conflicts that are occurring--especially in East Asia--this map becomes a very valuable online resource for teaching political geography. 


Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 


Tagseconomic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 29, 2014 5:48 PM

Option topic Marine  Environments and management

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U4

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Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate

Where Do Borders Need to Be Redrawn? - Room for Debate | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What parts of the world should rethink their maps? Why and how?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Maps are always changing as a new nation gets added and old lines cease to make sense. Territory is claimed and reclaimed.  This series of seven articles in the New York Times explores regional examples of how borders impacts places from a variety of scholarly perspectives.  Together, these article challenge student to reconsider the world map and to conceptualize conflicts within a spatial context.

 

Tags: bordersmapping, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 2014 10:53 AM

WOW, some really interesting thoughtdebate points here! very very unit 4

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:05 PM

APHG-U4

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Crimea, Nagorno-Karabakh and the Gordian Knot

Crimea, Nagorno-Karabakh and the Gordian Knot | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Is this an opportune moment for Eurasian powers to tackle the festering Nagorno-Karabakh conflict?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Recently Crimea has has been a hot topic and in years past Chechyna was another much discussed topic.  Both of these ‘hot spots’ have some important geographic reasons as to why they are hot spots.  The collapse of the Soviet Union and the subsequent re-emergence of the Russian Federation have created geopolitical ripples that reverberate throughout the region.  Transnistria, Abkhazia and Novorussiya are places that few have ever heard about, but are now becoming critical locations for international relations because of they have an uncertain status that might shift soon.  One place to add to that list is Nagorno Karabakh, a region that is ethnically Armenian but nestled within Azerbaijan.  This article argues that now is an opportune moment to settle this issue that has been festering since the 90s, even if many feel that the international community is indifferent on the issue.    


Tags: political, sovereignty, territoriality, statesAzerbaijan, Armenia.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, May 19, 2014 12:26 PM

You can find this on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nagorno-Karabakh

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 27, 2014 12:44 PM

The Crimea region has been hotly debated and fought over for quite a while now. The collapse of the USSR created a power vacuum in Eastern Europe which led to the contest for power in many of the former Soviet Satellite countries, including Ukraine. The Crimean peninsula, while mostly occupied by Russians, is legally a part of Ukraine, but maybe not for long. The Russian government is seemingly working to annex the peninsula while the Ukrainian government is working to keep it. The region will continue to be under lots of tugging and pulling for a while until a single government wins in to their nation. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:36 AM

this is a perfect example of some of the conflicts which have resulted because of the failure of the soviet state. with many of these states trying to gain land that the view as theirs, these wars can only really end in bloodshed or massive investments in peace.

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Trans-Dniester pleads to join Russia

Trans-Dniester pleads to join Russia | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Pro-Russian politicians and activists in Moldova's breakaway Trans-Dniester region have asked the Russian parliament to draft a law that would allow their territory to join Russia.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Transnistria (or the Trans-Dniester region) is one of my favorite examples to use in the classroom when discussing territories that function as a state, but is not internationally recognized.  After the fall of the Soviet Union, ethnic Russians in the former Soviet Republic of Moldova, wanted to remain politically tied to Russia rather than part of an independent Moldova.  Now that Crimea (also an area with many ethnic Russians that were politically separated from Russia after the collapse of the Soviet Union) appears to be reuniting with Russia, many in Transnistria are hopeful that this could be a political opportunity for them to likewise rejoin with Russia.  The Crimean situation has upset the status quo in the region.       


Tags: political, sovereignty, territoriality, states, unit 4 political.

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Coach Frye's curator insight, March 20, 2014 10:46 AM

The Trans-Dniester region functions as a working state, but is not internationally recognized as such.  Members of this region are hoping Russia will annex them for political and economic stability.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 1:08 PM

A nation that is not internationally recognized, Trans-Dniester reflect how borders are subject to changed based on cultural differences. The region identifies with Russia more than it does with Moldova. After the USSR broke up, the borders were created without considering demographic and cultural makeup of each region of the new states. With the Ukraine and with Trans-Dniester we see how many eastern European regions still identify with Russia. As Russia seems more willing to expand, many borders are likely to change in the area.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 1, 2015 8:10 PM

This situation only further complicates Eastern European dynamics.  One thing that stood out to me after reading this aritcle is the reality that anti-Russian Ukraine is sandwiched between pro-Russian eastern Ukraine and pro-Russian eastern Moldova.  This situation can only get uglier.

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No union, no pound, British official warns Scots backing independence

No union, no pound, British official warns Scots backing independence | Geography Education | Scoop.it
LONDON – Escalating the fight against secession, the British government warned Thursday that Scotland would lose the right to continue using the pound as its currency if voters there say yes to a historic referendum on independence this fall.


Osborne’s stark warning, delivered in a speech in Edinburgh, the Scottish capital, represented a new willingness by unionists to take a hard line in persuading Scottish voters to shun independence in a September plebiscite. A thumbs-up would end Scotland’s 307-year-old marriage to England and Wales and cause the biggest political shakeup in the British Isles since Ireland split from the British crown nearly a century ago.


Sturgeon predicted that “what the Treasury says now in the heat of the campaign would be very different to what they say after a democratic vote for independence, when common sense would trump the campaign rhetoric.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an intriguing strategic move by the UK as Scotland considers  independence.  Some have argued that this move will backfire and push more Scottish voters into the "yes" camp.  In related news, the BBC reports that EU officials say that an independent Scotland would have a hard time joining the European Union.  


Tags: devolutionpolitical, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political, currency, economic.
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:40 AM

The countries of Britain want their independence. Scotland uses the pound just like England and Wales but its being threatened that the government might take away that right to use that monetary system. 

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Argentina renews Falklands claims

Argentina renews Falklands claims | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner renews her claims for sovereignty of the Falklands at a UN Security Council meeting.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Are they the Falklands or Las Malvinas?  It's not just a simple linguistic translation but also a statement of territoriality and geopolitical recognition.  This article nicely summarizes the current situation. For a great teaching resource on the historical ebbs and flows in this longstanding dispute between Argentina and the UK, see the second slideshow in this series of  AP Human Geography talks that was given at NCGE earlier this month. 


Tags: Argentinaborders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:10 PM

I think that countries trying to unite and make claims is sort of like going to a bad college party in a station wagon with people that you might not like, don't like you, and are not like you... At least in the case of the USA.  As for Argentina, well I hope they're not as ravishly divided as the united of the constituents of America.  I don't really have anything good to say about this country... I have been physically and psychologically abused by police, damaged and violated by medical establishments, and I'm really sick of other people acting like they have the god-given right or my permission to treat me less than pleasantly.  How does this relate to Argentina requesting sovereignty? Well, I relate my personal experience to their situation in that they might be better off sovereign than being operated on by deranged fugitive doctors or beaten up by cops in bad relationships... so to speak.  For a lack of sovereignity would pose negative things that might befall their people.  I think that there is a greater chance for greater things to happen to them if they do it alone, rather than being told what to do, or being thought through and puppetted by other countries!

Joshua Mason's curator insight, February 19, 2015 12:59 PM

Often times, the thoughts of the Days of Empire are long gone. Most people see World War I as the boiling over of competition for colonies. As Europe gave most of their colonies up in the mid-20th century, some of them still stayed in their colonists' hands. The Falklands are that shining example of the UK's Empire days and it's understandable why they would want to hold on to them. Not only are they a decent naval base for operations in the Americas and along the Atlantic, they remind Great Britain that she was (and one could argue still is) a world power on the sea and land. No country wants to give away land voluntarily. Argentina sees these islands as her's and wants them back while the United Kingdom still holds claim. The UK also has the backing of the inhabitants when a referendum was held. Only three of the residents on the Falklands voted to split from its over seas ruler. What do you do when a country right off your shores demands your home back while a country thousands of miles away wants to keep you? It was a recipe for disaster in the 80's and still proves to be a point of tension in the 21st century.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:10 AM

The controversy of the Falklands continues. You would think that someone would have proposed viable solution to this issue by now. The Falklands war back in the 1980's remains one of my favorite skirmishes in history. The whole issue is throwback to the colonial era when the sun never set on the British Empire. In the years following the Second World War, the Empire collapsed. Today there is virtually nothing left of that once great empire. Great Britain should let one of its last vestiges of Empire go. There is no need for the British government to administer an Island in South America. The days of imperialism and colonialism have long since passed.