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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya

Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For millions of refugees across Africa life is a daily struggle.  Many dream of one day returning to their homeland while others have spent decades building a new life.  On World Refugee Day, BBC Focus on Africa's Anne Soy visits a Somali family in Nairobi, Kenya, who cannot imagine returning to their roots."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In addition to this video, see this photo gallery of refugees around the world for some additional context of 'regular life' for refugees. 


Questions to Ponder: Is it the duty of a refugee to return to their home country as soon as it is safe?  If you were a refugee, what geographic factors (economic, cultural, political, environmental) would shape you decisions to stay or return?


Tags: refugees, migration, Somalia, Africa,

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:44 AM

I don't believe its a refugee's duty to return to their country. I think after some time people start their lives over, for a reason. Most refugees leave their country because it is so bad. This family in the video went to another country and he was there for almost twenty years, that is a long time.  when your in a place for that long going back would mean starting over again. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2:04 PM

No matter where you grow up, you form roots to your native land. Times are tough across the globe, especially for those living in Africa. While families plant their roots and look for ways to make things better, sometimes the best way is to leave. What makes people stay when their hometown roots are at rock bottom?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:59 PM

Some people want to stay close to their heritage and native land. Others have no interest in their homelands and want to get away fast. This family doesn't know anything besides being refugees and they want to stay and build their lives there.

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Somalia's Pirates Face Growing Backlash

Somalia's Pirates Face Growing Backlash | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Abshir Boyah, a pirate who says he has hijacked more than 25 ships off the coast of Somalia, says he will give up this career if certain terms are met.

 

What economic, cultural and political circumstances in the 21st century would allow for piracy to exist?  What are the impacts of piracy on Somalia?  

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 7, 2012 7:57 AM
The concept of piracy is a scary one. Their illegal ways cause corruption throughout their society. However, it seems as if they do not have much choice. Yes, it is morally wrong, but look at the money they are making. The prirates are willing to cease illegal activity if their demands are met. Their demands are not out of the ordinary-- they want their oceans protected from toxic waste, job creations, and a fair government. Somalia has a long road ahead of them to acheive any sort of unity.
James Good's comment, April 19, 2013 5:14 PM
Piracy is continuing to grow in Somalia because the country has adopted the practice as a part of their culture. Although many of the Somalian people oppose piracy, there are a large number of people who are supporting it and benefiting from it. For many of these people, pirating money is the only opportunity they have to make money. Many of them seek alternatives and wish to end their criminal practices but there is nothing else they can do. Unfortunately, pirates in Somalia have labelled their country with a negative stereotype. Whenever people think of Somalia, they will think of the Somalian pirates and the trouble that they have caused for foreign ships.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 28, 2013 8:41 PM

Much like the piracy in the Caribbean in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries it is done in order to gain wealth and by the looks of it, fame.  They are called Pirate Kings in the video by the New York Times.  Again much like the pirate kings of the Caribbean.  Here however they are willing to give it up in order to better their country with the help of the internation community, the pirates of the Caribbean didn't have a country and they liked it that way.  However, it was tried in the early 1990's to help allievate the food and humanitarian suffering.  However the warlords of the time, especailly Aideed, saw their power, as well as their money, disappearing, so they fought this relief effort and kept Somalia in the dangerous situation it is in today.  So you have to ask the question: Can you take the pirates seriously that they want to change??  Past history says no.

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UNDP - Somalia Cash for Work

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is working to be a force for good in the least developed parts of the world that often face political and economic instability.  This is one program designed to help.  For more on the UNDP's work in the Horn of Africa, visit: http://www.undp.org/hornofafrica

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Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead

Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Eighteen months ago, central Mogadishu was like an African Stalingrad.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Somalia's political troubles are not over, but it is no longer the drought-ridden country overrun by Islamist extremist that it was two years ago.  For years it held the dubious title of "the world's most failed state."  Al Shabbab, the militant group linked to Al Qaeda, left the capital of Mogadishu in 2011 and in 2012 lost their last stronghold.  Piracy still exists off the Somali coast, but it has lessened as a semblance of political order is being restored to the Horn of Africa.

 

Tags: Somalia, Africa, political, conflict, war.

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Jerod Garland's curator insight, October 2, 2013 11:06 AM

Many other countries complain about the US getting into things that aren't our business, but what I've noticed, if we don't intervene, it does  become our problem because of all the ties we have around the world. One place fights another because they think something isn't going their way. But if one place goes down, there is other places that rely on the place that just fell. Then it becomes a butterfly effect and more people are affected than intended.

Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 9:57 AM

Somalia has been the go-to criticism example for anarchy and lawlessness in my generation, but with the times our metaphors must also change. I'm interesting in seeing how Somalia gains control after a time of such factionalism.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 10:12 AM

This article describes the stabilizing political situation in Somalia. The country was long without a central government and the instability made Somalia a haven for Islamic extremists and piracy. In 2012, Somalia held successful elections and the new government, located in the Puntland region, has been taking territory from Al Shabaab and reducing piracy. The increasing stability could improve Somalia's economy as interest in its oil could see significant foreign investment into the former "failed state."

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The 2011 Failed States Index

The 2011 Failed States Index | Geography Education | Scoop.it

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  Foreign Policy, in conjunction with the Fund for Peace, has created a statistical ranking to measure the lack of effective political institutions.  For the 4th year running, Somalia has been statistically measured as the most failed state on Earth. Chad and Sudan are respectively ranked as the 2nd and 3rd most failed states.The 12 metrics that are a part of this index are:

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Illegitimate Govts.

•Brain Drain

•Public Services

•Inequality

•Group Grievances

•Human Rights

•Economic Decline

•Security Forces

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention

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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 16, 2012 6:57 PM
The global fallout of the Arab revolutions may be largely determined by demographics and political stability. Unlike Somalia for example which is in total anarchy, the Arab Spring uprisings occurred in more stable but oppressive governments. So this brings up the question, can a failed state rescue itself?
Derek Ethier's comment, November 5, 2012 11:35 AM
Althought sub-Saharan Africa has 5 of the 10 most quickly developing countries, they still lag very far behind the rest of the world in quality of living. Somalia, Chad and Suda are the most failed states on Earth, in order. The governments are unable to protect/provide for their people, brain drains suck the great minds to more developed countries, income inequalities ravage the nations, basic human rights are denied and the economies are pathetic. Overall, it is a sad story as many of these African nations also suffer from drought, famine and massive food shortages.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 1:11 PM

 I wonder why it is difficult for states to be formed. I would think it would be great because the village people won’t be forced to make big decisions they can just hire someone to do it for them. But in the other hand there would be other people who will make it difficult for them and will ruin it for everyone else. Becoming a state can change there live. They should have approved to become a state.