Geography Education
1.3M views | +49 today
Follow
Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Atlas of Economic Complexity

"The Atlas is a powerful interactive tool enabling policy makers, entrepreneurs, academics, students and the general public to map the path of diversification and prosperity for 128 countries.  The tool will allow users to explore growth opportunities by country and industry, with the potential to provide input into economic policy and private investment decisions. The analysis may also be used to inform the agendas of development banks in policy recommendations and loan programming; an entrepreneur developing a market plan; an investment promotion agency pitching a new factory, as well as guide other choices we have yet to imagine." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-21a

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is an introduction to the Atlas of Economic Complexity; in it they use the visualization tool to analyze the Netherlands' economy and the cut flower industry.  The Atlas of Economic Complexity is hosted by the Center for International Development at Harvard University (MIT also worked on this project and on their site it is called the Observatory of Economic Complexity).


Tags: developmentindustry, visualization, statistics, economicNetherlandsvideo.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Amsterdam Canals

It was busy today on the Canals in Amsterdam. Especially at the junction Prinsengracht/Leidsegracht.


TagsNetherlands, transportationplace, neighborhood, landscape, time lapsevideo.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Could this transportation network and system work everywhere?  If not, geography and place are critical factors to shaping the human landscape. 

more...
John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, August 31, 2015 2:19 PM

Look at how self-organised this works perfectly. It's just a matter of how you can solve things together.

Suggested by Thomas Schmeling
Scoop.it!

Amsterdam City: a City as Urban Statistics

Amsterdam City: a City as Urban Statistics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Amsterdam City Dashboard presents the city of Amsterdam through the lens of data, including demographic statistics, traffic reports, noise readings or political messages.

The small collection of information graphics are divided in distinct domains, such as transport, environment, statistics, economy, social, cultural and security. All data is shown in near real-time, based on blocks of 24 hours. Larger dots and darker colors symbolize higher values, whereas an interactive map provides a geographic reference."


Tags: Netherlands, urbanstatistics, urban ecology, transportation, planning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Holland vs the Netherlands

"What's the difference between Holland and the Netherlands?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is produced by the same gentleman that made the video that explains the difference between the terms Great Britain, England and the UK and another one that details why London is not the City of London. His style is to bombard you with facts which tell a rich story about the intricacies of place, power and culture.   


Tags: Netherlands, political, toponyms, historical

more...
Brett Sinica's comment, April 22, 2013 8:56 PM
I have seen this video previously, and this being my second time, it is much easier to understand this time around. He tells the story of one great kingdom and all areas that are under its control or influence. With the expansion of many European countries within the last couple centuries, I can understand how people can get culture and people mixed up, even though they’re from the same place to begin with. It reminds of the Arabs, or Arabic people. They don’t necessarily come from one country or one language or one religion. They represent a vast group of people and each of them differ or relate in certain ways. At times understanding these different groups can be a challenge, but in the end that is what makes them more unique and interesting.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 3:54 PM
Well this video was fairly interesting actually. Funnily enough, my Canadian friend made me watch the Great Britain video about a month ago and so when I saw this was made by the same person and I always seem to confuse Belgium/Netherlands/Holland it seemed like something I should think about doing. The video was very informational and the narrator went over many factual things including the simple question of: Where is everything? The video mainly focuses on physical geography of people but also goes on to explain that the ‘Dutch’ living in the Caribbean are actual ‘Europeans’ because they belong to the Kingdom of the Netherlands which belongs to the European Union which by the transitive property makes them Euros.

I liked what Brett said, that cultures and groups of people typically get categorized together as one when they really aren’t and it is important to acknowledge their distinctions and understand the different groups and cultures of people.
Opslagruimte Huren in Netherlands-Salland Storage's comment, February 2, 1:13 AM
bit.ly/1SAe8f4
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How the Dutch Got Their Bike Paths

How the Dutch Got Their Bike Paths | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What The Netherlands can teach us about child safety and mass protests as effective policy-benders.

 

Urban planning in the United States often focuses so much the automobile as the primary, essential mode of transportation, that we take it as a given that our cities must be built around current automobile usage patterns.  Are there other ways to design cities?  The Netherlands provide an informative counter-example to American "automotive-driven" urbanism.  Follow the links for the 6 minute video.    

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different

How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different | Geography Education | Scoop.it
While researching a book on ‘Why the Dutch are Different’, Ben Coates realised that an amazingly large number of the things which an outsider might think of as ‘typically Dutch’ could be explained at least in part by a single factor: water.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Cultural, political and economic patterns of a region are heavily influenced by the environmental settings.  Occasionally though, geographers can get overly-cautious when discussing how the environment can shape culture, worried about straying into realm of environmental determinism.  However, environmental factors can profoundly influence cultural attributes.  This article shows how Dutch cultural attributes such as diet, history, politics and landscape are influenced by their maritime physical setting. 

 

TagsNetherlands, culture, place, water, environment.

more...
asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:37 AM

What is "typically" #Dutch? #sea #saltwater #sailing #trade #ancient #heritage

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:50 AM

unit 3

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:55 AM

Environmental Determinalism....Unit 3

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Most Complex International Borders in the World

"In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some of my favourites."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video):


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.


more...
ELAdvocacy's curator insight, October 3, 2014 9:40 AM

There are so many reasons our immigrant students come to the United States.  Some stories are so complex and painful it can be extremely difficult for Americans to understand.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 3, 2014 10:21 PM

Interesting!

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:39 AM

The Most Complex International Borders in the World

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Cycling Infrastructure

The Netherlands is well known for its excellent cycling infrastructure. How did the Dutch get this network of bicycle paths? Read more: http://bicycledutch.w...
more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 2014 4:35 PM

This video depicts the way that the Dutch got there cycling in the early years and it also shows the maufacturing process in which goes into making a bike. In this video it goes flashbacks of how the bike has evolved throughtout generations and time.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Pixelizing Dutch Landscapes

Pixelizing Dutch Landscapes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The artistic collection entitled 'Landscapes' compiled  "the bizarre instances of cartographic dissonance inflicted by the Dutch government over their virtual lands. As Henner notes, the number of censored sites within the small country of the Netherlands is surprising, as is the technique used by officials to disguise them. Tracts of land deemed vulnerable to attack or misappropriation are transformed into large tapestries of multi-colored polygons, archipelagos of abstraction floating in swaths of open fields, dense forests, and clusters of urban development."  For additional context, see the original gallery.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Zwarte Piet: Holland’s Christmastime tradition racist?

Zwarte Piet: Holland’s Christmastime tradition racist? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

In the Netherlands, Santa doesn't have little elves; he has a helper (slave?) named Zwarte Piet, literally Black Pete.  He delights kids with cookies and a goofy persona.  Foreign visitors are startled by his resemblance to Little Black Sambo.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Is this a harmless cultural tradition or is it racist?   Why might some Dutch not see this as offensive?  Why might someone not from there react so strongly to this caricature? What do you think?  (Note: a Dutch friend of mine was quick respond: "Sinterklaas' helpers are black because of the ashes in the chimney."  I'm curious to know whether that was always the case or if it's a way to 'whitewash' an old tradition from a bygone era.  And yes, this is an annual controversy). 

more...
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 12:44 PM

Zwarte Piet remains a staple of Dutch culture, but today people are enraged by the racist connotations that the character portrays. Zwarte Piet was brought back from Spain by Santa. At the time of the traditional story, the Dutch, along with much of Europe, was exploring and exploiting the continent of Africa. Many people believe that "Black Pete" is a racist representation of black people, and that the tradition should end. Others argue that a tradition is a tradition.

 

Can traditions be considered racist? Or are they historical anecdotes chronicling the development of a culture, thus unable to make a modern stance?