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Sprawling Shanghai

Sprawling Shanghai | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you could go back in time to the 1980s, you would find a city that is drastically different than today’s Shanghai.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This series of seven satellite images shows how quickly the economic development of China has impacted the urban sprawl of China's biggest cities.  Pictures of the downtown area's growth are impressive, but these aerial images show the full magnitude of the change. 

 

Tags: urbanremote sensing, megacities, China, urban ecology.

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China installs weapons on contested South China Sea islands

China installs weapons on contested South China Sea islands | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New satellite imagery indicates that China has installed weapon systems on all seven artificial islands it has built in the contested waters of the South China Sea, a move that's likely alarm the country's neighbors.

 

Tags: borders, political, conflict, China, remote sensing, East Asia.

Seth Dixon's insight:

UPDATE: After this news, the Pentagon says a Chinese warship has seized a US Navy underwater drone collecting unclassified data in international waters in the South China Sea.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, January 4, 3:41 PM
With a new president on our horizon, how will this affect our relationship with China?
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The Tidal Waves of the Qiantang River

The Tidal Waves of the Qiantang River | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For hundreds of years, on the eighth month of the lunar calendar, people have gathered along the shores of China’s Qiantang River at the head of Hangzhou Bay to witness the waves of its famous bore tide. Higher-than-normal high tides push into the harbor, funneling into the river, causing a broad wave that can reach up to 30 feet high. If the waves surge over the banks, spectators can be swept up, pushed along walkways or down embankments. Below, I’ve gathered images from the past few years of the Qiantang bore tides.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an amazing set of images, where a cultural phenomenon is wrapped up in observing the pulsating physical geography of the river.  Usually the tidal bore is impressive (but not dangerous--see video here), but occasionally it can be incredibly violent (see this 2015 video).   

 

Tags: physical, geomorphologywaterChina.

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Kiran's comment, September 24, 2016 8:33 AM
http://onlinemoviesvideos.com/
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 28, 2016 8:56 PM

Tital bores - the values of water 

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Why China and India face a marriage crisis

"What has lead to this marriage squeeze?  First, millions women have gone 'missing'. A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age. The result is that single men far outnumber women."

 

Tags: gender, ChinaIndia, culture, population.

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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, September 17, 2016 7:23 PM
Great food for thought!
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Tibetans Fight to Salvage Fading Culture in China

Tibetans Fight to Salvage Fading Culture in China | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When officials forced an informal school run by monks near here to stop offering language classes for laypeople, Tashi Wangchuk looked for a place where his two teenage nieces could continue studying Tibetan.  To his surprise, he could not find one, even though nearly everyone living in this market town on the Tibetan plateau here is Tibetan. Officials had also ordered other monasteries and a private school in the area not to teach the language to laypeople. And public schools had dropped true bilingual education in Chinese and Tibetan, teaching Tibetan only in a single class, like a foreign language, if they taught it at all."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video and article from the NY Times show how many Tibetans are upset by the cultural status of Tibetans within the People's Republic of China. 

 

TagsCentral Asia, culture, China, East Asia.

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Jerry Li's curator insight, March 20, 2016 9:23 AM

 Yes, Tibatan will be very upset.

I think we should preserve every culture, not only chinese culture.

Tibetan is their mother tongue.  As every culture has its own special characteristic.

"And public schools had dropped true bilingual education in Chinese and Tibetan" this quote shows Tibetan cannot learn both language.

  The officials cannot forced them to learn chinese, and should give Tibetan a bilingual education just like Singapore.

This will result that Tibatan's children do not know their mother tongue and lost that culture gradually.

Although this can assimilate Tibetan to become Chinese in future but I think the offcials can give TIbetan some choices to choose.

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Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off

Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The BBC's Celia Hatton finds out why one restaurant in Shanghai is serving up American-style Chinese food
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article covers the same topic as this NPR podcast, the success of an American-style Chinese restaurant in China.  Some joked that it was akin to selling snow to Eskimos, but there is a local appetite among the youth that want to experiment with the 'foreign,' but also with American ex-pats that crave a taste of home. This is just one more delicious example of how globalization impacts cultural products and how globalization flows in many unexpected directions.  For more, see this TED talk on the search for the origins of General Tso's chicken, and this podcast of the historical geographies of the fortune cookie.    

 

Tags: foodglobalization, culture, China, East Asia, podcast.

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Chinese forces 'used flamethrowers' in Xinjiang operation

Chinese forces 'used flamethrowers' in Xinjiang operation | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A Chinese military newspaper gives graphic details of a raid in Xinjiang province against suspected militants." http://wp.me/p2Ij6x-60y 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This BBC article gives an update on China's crackdown on Uighur nationalism under the guise of cracking down of 'foreign terrorists.'  Earlier this year I wrote this article for the National Geographic Education Blog on this topic, the always simmering tensions in the China's westernmost province of Xinjiang.  


TagsCentral Asia, political, conflictgovernance, China, East Asia.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 30, 2015 2:18 PM

This is a disturbing development, as the use of flamethrowers has been frowned upon by the international community since WWII. The use of them by the Chinese in a suppression operation by the Chinese government is especially disturbing, as it shows a willingness to use outlawed weapons against domestic enemies. What does this mean that they're willing to use against foreign enemies.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:11 PM

As a student who someday wants to teach social studies at the high school level, this article brought to light one of the hardest concepts to teach. There are always two sides to every story. While the victors get to write history, the victims are often silenced over time. One man's violent rebellion is another man's treasonous operations. Honestly, the Chinese have done an excellent job of keeping this out of the western media. The only real struggle we ever hear about in China that of Tibet and Taiwan.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:37 PM

This is really disturbing to know that China is attacking their ethnic minority who is just protesting for what they believing in. To make things worst, the Chinese government controls the media and they basically can say whatever they want. For example, referring to these ethnic minority as foreign terrorist. That changes the perspective on how people view and perceive the situation happening in Xinjiang.

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China to end one-child policy

China to end one-child policy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"All couples will now be allowed to have two children, the state-run news agency said, citing a statement from the Communist Party. The controversial policy was introduced nationally in 1979, to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate. However, concerns at China's aging population led to pressure for change."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The most extensive and controversial anti-natalist program in the world was China's one-child policy (see also BBC's '5 numbers that sum up China's one child policy' and NPR's 'unintended consequences of the one child policy').  Experts have been concerned with how fast China is aging and that the population was shrinking faster than would be healthy for the economy (not to mention the gender-imbalance that it creates). Today that policy was been relegated to the history books, but the impacts of the policy will continue to have far-reaching impacts (for more see this Population Reference Bureau article, CNN video, Guardian article, Bloomberg Business article, and BBC video/article).


TagsChina, populationdeclining populations, unit 2 population, gender.

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 24, 2015 6:58 AM

Chinas change in policy can be directly attributed to the need of unskilled labor. China has become an economic superpower, by exploiting its vast resources of labor. For decades, China has had a vast reservoir of cheap labor to rely on. In recent years, that vast reservoir has begun to run dry. This new phenomenon can be traced to the governments one child policy.  The lack of multiple new births has lead to an older population. An older population can provide the type of manual labor, that China needs to compete in the global market. The government  hopes to revesre the aging trend by ending this policy. If successful, China would likely see another era of great growth within its economy.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:37 PM

Lets not forget the expansion of china also with its economic strength and its military strength which is a threat to other countries in the area because china can take control and with Chinese moving into Africa and United states as residents china is going to need to populate its own country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:55 PM

First implemented in 1979 and diminished in 2013 It is good to hear something like this has finally come to an end. Although it deemed successful by stopping the birth of an estimated 400 million babies, there were some places that allowed two children in rural areas if the first was a girl. It is assumed though that even though this is no longer a required policy, many couples may only have one child since it is accepted as a social norm. 

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The World’s Largest Urban Area Grew Overnight

The World’s Largest Urban Area Grew Overnight | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rapid growth in several cities along the Pearl River Delta has made a Chinese megacity larger and more populous than any other urban area in the world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What was a rural landscape dominated by rice paddy fields just a few decades ago is now home to the largest Metropolitan region in the world (depending on who is counting and what areas they are including).  The "slider" comparison of these two satellite images taken of the same area in 1988 and 2014 is staggering (click here for an animated GIF of the same imagery).   


Tags: urbanremote sensing, megacities, China, urban ecology.

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Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 16, 2015 8:50 PM

Already this image is showing a clear impact that the massive increase in population is having on the landscape. The delata has narrowed and so has the major rivers. As population grows in mega cities like this so doesnt the increase for resources such as water, also when it increases this quickly sanitation practices decrease. One can only imagine the inpact on water quality this is also having.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 7:46 AM

It is amazing how fast a modern city can come about when there is no historical city to base the subsequent growth on.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 16, 2015 3:39 PM

It is astounding the amount of growth this one city has had in one decade and reminds me of some of the rapid development within the Middle East since the 70s which transformed cities like Dubai. Ecologically like most of what China does it is a disaster but fascinating from a development  one. Unfortunately the article doesn't offer a population so that it could be compared to Tokyo's since a size comparison was done in terms of land use. Hopefully China will find a sustainable method of growth because if city continue to grow like this it will be surprising if they could maintain stability. I personally thing this rapid growth is dangerous and like India they likely won't be able to keep up. Additionally since China's economy is very reliant on this type of growth it is concerning to think of what may happen to many of these cities when the growth they rely on stops.

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Changes in Three Gorges Dam

NASA's animation of China's Three Gorges Dam construction over the years.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world’s largest dam was created to generate more energy for China’s ever-expanding economy and to increase the interior economic development by increasing the navigability of the river.  The dam also can control downstream flooding and protect important industrial centers such as Shanghai.  This ambitious hydroelectric dam produces the same amount of energy as 18 nuclear power plants.  This dam also displaced over 1 million people as the reservoir flooded properties upstream.  The Three Gorges Dam prevents the nutrient-rich sediments from being deposited downstream; this heightens Chinese farmers’ need for fertilizers, this has led to drought downstream and limits residents’ water access. The dam also disrupted the local ecology (part of the reason the Yangtze River Dolphin went extinct), preventing fish to migrate to upstream breeding grounds. 

For good and ill, the dam has profoundly modified the environment and this video animation from NASA is a powerful demonstration of the changes.       


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, video, land use, environment, environment modify, water, economic, development, China, East Asia, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2015 6:32 PM

Inland water - environmental change 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 5:40 PM

The impact of the Three Gorges Dam on the residents upstream is amazing. I cannot imagine anything like this happening in the US, mostly because of the impact on the people both upstream and downstream. Ecological damage from this dam may not phase the Chinese government, but I think any North American or European government would shudder at the thought of the backlash among their citizens this would create.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:27 PM

Three Gorges damn in China is the largest dam ever constructed. This was created to save on power by creating hydroelectric power for the people of the land. One of the issues with this was the the flooding of the land up streams displacing millions of people. It created a larger up stream area and very small down stream. A lot of the people that lived up stream had to be relocated further inland and faced changing climatif weather. The banks of the river are carved out between what seems like mountainous regions so as you move more uphill the weather and temperature will be a whole new category of life (Depending on how far you relocated).

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When China Rules the Sea

When China Rules the Sea | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The United States is no longer the world’s only global naval power.


Why would China go to the trouble and expense of mounting an expedition to the northern climes in the Western Hemisphere? Because it sees value in staging a presence in distant waters. And because it can: Beijing no longer depends completely on its oceangoing battle fleet to ward off threats in China’s seas. It can now rain long-range precision firepower on enemy fleets from land. Ergo, the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) fleet can cruise the far reaches of the Pacific and Indian oceans or even beyond, without forfeiting China’s interests in waters close to home.  For China, the upsides of far-ranging maritime strategy are many and compelling, the downsides fewer and fewer.


Tagsgeopolitics, political, waterChina, East Asia.

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Greg Hill's curator insight, September 28, 2015 12:05 PM
UNCLOS
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 24, 2015 7:07 AM

The nation that controls the seas, controls the world. Throughout history the leading Naval powers have always been the worlds most dominate nations. The greatest land forces, are no match for the supremacy of the seas. Not even Napoleon could beet back the power of a supreme navy( The British Royal Navy). Since the end of the Second World War, The United States navy has dominated the seas. That domination has made the U.S the worlds greatest nation over the course of the past 75 years. For China to displace the U.S atop the nations hierarchy, they most out due us on the seas. China is ware of this history, and that is why they are heavily investing in their naval technology. The key to the future, as it has been in the past, will be what nation can dominate the worlds seas.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:23 AM

the growing strength of the Chinese navy is worrying from a military perspective, as during the cold war one of the main reasons they were not considered as big a threat as the Russians was because of their inability to project force beyond mainland china. with their navel improvements this is no longer the case. what this will hold for the future, we can only wait and see.

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China Fences In Its Nomads, and an Ancient Life Withers

China Fences In Its Nomads, and an Ancient Life Withers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Chinese government is in the final stages of a 15-year-old effort to transform millions of pastoralists who once roamed China’s vast borderlands.


TagsCentral Asia, culturefolk culturesecology, China.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The Chinese government claims that this project is ecological in nature and that pastoralism will degrade the grasslands; however, this is stamping out cultural groups that have been resistant to assimilation. 

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:26 PM

Discrimination exists in every industrialized society in every part of the globe, the result of poverty, ignorance, and hatred. The US is guilty of it just as much as any other nation, evident by the continued existence of income gaps between whites and blacks in the US, as well as the policy of the US in its handling of our native populations. Chinese discrimination against ethnic Tibetans has long been documented and observed within the West, meeting the condemnation of much of the Western world, and such cultural discrimination has continued in other provinces within China. As the coast has exploded in wealth per capita, and the culture there becomes increasingly westernized, these other cultures and peoples are in danger of inevitably being wiped out. This is the result of Chinese policy, which has actively worked to suppress and kill of these resistant cultures, for the sake of national identity and unity. Is America in a position to judge others for how they treat their ethnic minorities? Not at all- just look at the demographics of our prison system and our families who fall below the poverty line. Such racism has long been a facet of human civilization, and it is up to us to make it a thing of our past and not of our future. For these cultures in China, I fear the worst will inevitably pass, and the world will sit passively by as they are lost forever. It saddens me, and I hope that I am proven wrong.

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Which country has the biggest economy?

An animated infographic showing the top three economies throughout history. Does China have the world's largest economy? Is China's economy bigger than America's?


Tags: economic, China, development, India.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 2:31 PM

I think this was honestly super cool. It was interesting to see the massive size of the economies of China and India throughout history, especially coming from a background of eurocentric approaches to history in our education system. It's interesting to grow up hearing about the formidable size and power of the Roman Empire, only to discover that its power was dwarfed by two other empires, who have dominated their part of the globe for much of human history. It was stunning to see just how much the industrial revolution changed the geopolitical landscape; we learn about it and its affects in school, but I feel like the fact that it very much was a "revolution" is lost on kids. The world was completely altered by the advent of mass production, as evidenced by the swing of economic power from East to West following the revolution. It was also impressive to see just how large the American economy was in the 1950's. However, the tides have begun to turn, as we are quickly seeing the ascent of the Chinese economy once again, with India slowly getting back on track as well. With a population of over 1 billion people, India is the world's largest democracy, and has the potential to be a superpower on a scale that the world has never seen before.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:47 PM

i would never have thought that china and india would have dominated would economy throughout the past, now it is not that much of a suprise, but especially during the times where france britain and italy (romans) dominated the world, how is it possible that india and china were so far ahead of them economically?

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Why China is building islands in the South China Sea

"China is building islands in the South China sea and its causing disputes among the other nations in the region; Malaysia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, and Indonesia. China claims they aren't military bases, but their actions say otherwise. The US has many allies in the region and uses its massive Navy to patrol international waters, keeping shipping lanes open for trade."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Last year this was an intriguing story but now the geopolitical drama is growing as more countries are literally building islands out of reef outcroppings to strengthen their claims to the South China Sea.  For some without geographic expertise, this might some baffling.  For those that understand Exclusive Economic Zones, maritime claims, and expanding geopolitical aspirations, this makes perfect sense. 

 

Tags: borders, political, conflict, waterChina, East Asia.

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India watches anxiously as Chinese influence grows

India watches anxiously as Chinese influence grows | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A $46bn economic corridor through disputed territories in Kashmir is causing most concern
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Indian government doesn't want to seem threatened by the fact that China is paying for better transportation infrastructure that is essentially in their backyard.  India's neighbors are excited for the potential economic growth that this can bring, but weary of China's added clout and power throughout Asia.  As Parag Khanna argues is his new book Connectography, infrastructure and economic linkages will become increasingly more important to geopolitics and global economics; within that lens, China is certainly making a power move here. 

 

Tags: regions, transportationeconomic.

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'Leftover Women' in China

"Chinese women face immense pressure to get married before they turn 27. In many Chinese cities, so called marriage markets are a common sight, where parents go to post and match personal ads. A number of brave Chinese women have finally stood up to speak their mind against society’s labels and their parents' pressures."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This emotional ad about 'leftover women' in China has received a lot of traffic and is now invigorating a national conversation about marriage customs, gendered norms, and cultural expectations.  What isn't as explicit in the video is how demographic policies and cultural preferences for boys has created the situation that puts added pressure on single women

 

Questions to Ponder: How is this (at least partially) a lingering impact of the One Child Policy?  What traits of traditional Chinese culture led to this current situation?   

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, culture, population.

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Bad Earth: the human cost of pollution in China – in pictures

Bad Earth: the human cost of pollution in China – in pictures | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This series of images shows the extent of China’s pollution problems and the human toll of exponential growth on local communities in China’s vast and severely damaged northern region

 

Ghazlan Mandukai, 52, left, looks out over the vast, toxic tailings lake beyond the industrial city of Baotou, Inner Mongolia. He farmed in this area for 40 years until the influx of steel and rare earth metal factories rendered local lands infertile. Poisonous waste that results from refining rare earths is continually dumped into the Weikuang Dam, as seen here.

 

Tags: pollutionChina, East Asia, industry, sustainability, images, art, landscape.

 

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Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 2016 10:21 PM
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Xinjiang Seethes Under Chinese Crackdown

Xinjiang Seethes Under Chinese Crackdown | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Chinese government has introduced unprecedented measures aimed at shaping the behavior and beliefs of China’s 10 million Uighurs." http://wp.me/p2Ij6x-60y

Seth Dixon's insight:

This NY Times article is a good update on the situation of Xianjiang.  I wish this was available when I wrote this article (with links for more teaching resources) for the National Geographic Education Blog on the always simmering tensions in the China's westernmost province.  

 

TagsCentral Asia, culturepoliticalconflictgovernance,ChinaEast AsiareligionIslamlandscape.

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China pollution: First ever red alert in effect in Beijing

China pollution: First ever red alert in effect in Beijing | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Schools in Beijing are closed and outdoor construction halted as the Chinese capital's first ever pollution "red alert" comes into effect over smog levels."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A large part of China's rapid economic growth has been dependent on cutting corners in labor and environmental standards.  This is one reason why I don't think that the Chinese economy can continue this growth indefinitely.

 

Tags: pollutionChina, development, economic, megacities, East Asia, industry, sustainability, urban ecology.

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batuhan's curator insight, December 16, 2015 2:30 AM

Recently on top of continuing pollution increase in and around china, they have issued a 'red alert'. This red alert has officaly been the first ever making an effect in Bejing.stats show that the air is not healthy to breath and is 49% unhealthy to breath.Although the alert is to come to an end on Thursday the aftershock will felt for a long time in Bejing. Bbc claiming that China's air quality is a key factor in its push for a new global deal on climate change.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 16, 2015 11:03 AM

It is a real shame that China has let pollution go this far in its country. It really goes to show the sacrifices they are willing to make in order to be a major global economic power. Unfortunately for them this kind of action and rapid growth by cutting corners is what will likely stop them from becoming a major power (due to fast resource exhaustion and loss of environmental resources due to pollutants over time as well as species). The issue will likely remain unsolved due to the Chinese governments lack of concern. Hopefully China's slow shift to a consumer market will provide pollution relief as the factories leave for elsewhere (likely Africa).

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 6:39 PM

It's horrible to see China come to this. Soon, air pollution will be just as bad everywhere else if it is not stopped. We, everyone, has to do something to stop air pollution. This world is polluted enough. Stop air pollution so future generations can have a chance to have a good life and not have to worry about PM levels are in the air on a daily basis.

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China's one-child policy and the lessons for America

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Let's review exactly what population has to do with economic growth
Seth Dixon's insight:

The repeal of China's one-child policy has many exploring the linkages between population statistics and economic development.  This is a good article that tries to show the lessons learned in China with the one-child policy and apply them to the United States economic context.  Additionally, this animated map shows the rise in urbanization in China.    

 

TagsChina, population, industry, development, statistics, economic.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:00 PM

I found this article absolutely fascinating. In the 2016 presidential race, Democratic candidate (and, arguably, frontrunner) Bernie Sanders has pledged to raise corporate taxes in order to provide for social programs, better education, and universal healthcare for all its citizens. Critics have pointed to the failure of such a plan when he attempted to implement it in his home state of Vermont, where the working class was simply not large enough to support the retirement system Sanders attempted to put in place. Defenders of Bernie have argued that what's true of Vermont's demographic- the second least populated state in the country- will not hold true for the nation as a whole, and this article suggests that these defenders have a point. While economic growth may not be as fast for younger American workers, by 2040 these welfare programs will still be running under any additional strain. The same cannot be said for the Chinese, where the disproportionate number of males being born- 119 for every 100 female children- means that a huge population gap will emerge between younger and older Chinese. Without being able to father a new generation, this group of mostly-male Chinese will age and be an enormous burden on the Chinese economy, to an extent that's almost unfathomable here in the US. China has since revered its One Child Policy that put itself in its current predicament, but it may well be a case of too little, too late.

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:57 AM

Unit 2

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:03 AM

añada su visión ...

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China's Maritime Claims

ONE reason China’s spectacular rise sometimes alarms its neighbours is that it is not a status quo power. From its inland, western borders to its eastern and southern seaboard, it claims territory it does not control.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the geopolitical conflicts in the East Pacific have their roots in the territorial disputes over islands that at first glance seem as if they wouldn't be worth the trouble; how did this become a tense situation?  Since the UNCLOS agreement gives countries 200 nautical miles off their coasts to be an Exclusive Economic Zone, that greatly enhanced the strategic value of controlling these islands and the shipping lanes.  The United States, to counter Chinese claims, has used the Navy to go near some of the claimed (and reclaimed) islands recently.  This interactive map briefly highlights some of the details behind the conflicts with links for further readings. 


Questions to Ponder: Why do countries care so much about some minor islands?  Why would other countries not want to accept China's territorial assertions?


Tags: borders, political, conflict, China, East Asia.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:06 PM

Chinese expansion into the South Sea has been a longtime coming, and China's actions in the region are both a reflection of its growing strength and a huge diplomatic headache for the US and every other nation in the region. China's construction of artificial islands allows it to claim autonomy over a larger body of water, challenging the maritime power of every other nation in South East Asia, many of whom have economies reliant on the waters China now claims as its own, some 500 miles away from the Chinese mainland. With the emergence of the Chinese economy as a global power, its ambitious leaders have made plans to transform China from a regional military force to a new superpower- one that the established order, the US included, is entirely unsure of. Which of these nations can truly challenge China's decision to make these waters it's personal pond? It would be economic and political suicide, as China is an enormous global trading power, and has the potential to crush any of these nations in a military engagement. Could Japan? Perhaps, but the Chinese have already pressed ahead with their plans, regardless of Japanese political pressure. Involvement of the US is perhaps the last thing anyone wants- particularly both the US and China- but it is perhaps the only way China will heed pressure from abroad and cease  Chinese expansion in the region. The US and China must be allies, for the sake of global prosperity, but actions like these cannot be tolerated, by either party.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:51 PM

One reason to care about minor islands is the 200 nautical miles off the coast for the EEZ. This would give china more water territory for drilling of oil which I believe is there in those waters. Flexing more muscle for their navy to grow. Strategically the Chinese could take over these small islands and build air strips for future which would give them a chance to reach places they wouldn't be able to before and this would be good supply transactions during war, fueling, maneuver of man power. The other small countries also would lose their independence and would have to fall under china's rule. With the building of the man made islands and the Chinese navy protecting their people while they continue to build these islands and daring anyone to try and stop them is a sign that china is trying to dominate and expand with muscle. It is their time they have the economic, and military power to do so. Of course they don't want to deal with the u.s. and their allies militarily but it doesn't benefit the u.s. either. I don't believe u.s. wants to get involved in a battle with china and their allies.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:17 PM

Claiming territory it does not control, causes a lot of controversy with other country. The main problem here now is China is having a dispute with Japan about some islands. There could possibly be oil or natural resources.Japan says that the land was always theirs. China clearly likes to just put itself out there and make claims or place oil rigs wherever. This could be a big problem for them because if someone gets too offended by their actions there could end up being a war or some sort of conflict. Especially since they like to use military forces such as navy and air guarding "territory." 

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The Dramatic Landscape of China's Gansu Province

The Dramatic Landscape of China's Gansu Province | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Gansu Province, in northwestern China, is about the same size as California, with a population of about 26 million people. Gansu’s diverse landscapes include parts of the Gobi Desert, the Yellow River, numerous mountain formations, and remnants of the Silk Road and the Great Wall of China.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This photo gallery is filled with dozens of great teaching images, displaying the dramatic human and physical landscapes of the Gansu Province of China. 


Tagsimageslandscape, China.

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Jane Ellingson's curator insight, October 22, 2015 9:03 AM

Cultural Landscape

Tony Hall's curator insight, October 30, 2015 2:34 AM

Some truly amazing images in this collection from The Atlantic.

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30 charts and maps that explain China today

30 charts and maps that explain China today | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"China's mind-boggling size, economy and history, visualized.""

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:06 AM

These charts are fantastic at explaining the impact that china is having on the world. their economy is massive, and they tend to use a massive amount of global resources. it also amazes me how big their population is.

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 2016 12:10 PM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:05 AM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

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What China Has Been Building in the South China Sea

What China Has Been Building in the South China Sea | Geography Education | Scoop.it
China has been feverishly piling sand onto reefs in the South China Sea for the past year, creating seven new islets in the region. It is straining geopolitical tensions that were already taut.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Last year this was an intriguing story but now the geopolitical drama is growing as more countries are literally building islands out of reef outcroppings to strengthen their claims to the South China Sea.  This is the most comprehensive article that I've seen on the escalating situation.   


Tags: borders, political, conflict, waterChina, East Asia.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:01 PM

this strategy makes sense, even if it ignores international laws and angers every other nation on earth. china needs resources, and the south china sea has resources.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 4:02 PM

The fact that China is doing this in the first place is a profound geopolitical statement. They are in effect disregarding international law and acting as though they own the region. This also fly's in the face of countries in the Area such as Vietnam and the Philippines who have territorial water claims in that area of the region itself has been a matter of dispute for decades. This is partially due to the fact there is key oil and gas resources and china intends to use the islands they have made to claim and seize those deposits. trade also goes through the area making it possible for China to shut down regional trade if it gains these waters. This is a clear power display and shows China wants to supersede the U.S. not work with it. Hopefully the issue is resolved peacefully given that it has been causing heightened tensions with the Chinese Navy patrolling the area. The international community should have acted earlier to stop this because now it will be far more difficult and makes nations like the U.S. look weaker. Not to mention the vast environmental consequences for destroying reefs filled with unique wildlife thus disrupting the ecosystem.

Gouraud's curator insight, January 6, 2016 3:16 PM

En une année pour construire un port et un terrain d’atterrissage à partir d'un atoll submergé....

Inquiétant.

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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy


Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.

Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

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François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 2015 4:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 2015 9:02 AM

Une courte vidéo de la revue The Economist

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.