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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Daylight Saving Time Explained

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you haven't discovered CGP Grey yet, his YouTube channel is a veritable fountain of geographic tidbits.  Day Light Savings (whether you agree with it or not) has to do with fundamental Earth-Sun relationships and have some corresponding spatial patterns of who does or does not follow it.  The tag below links to my archive of his many geographically related videos.   


Tags: CGP Grey.

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Charli Wiggill's curator insight, November 2, 2015 6:45 AM

@Jackie Barnard - any use for your geographers?

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Countries inside Countries: Bizarre Borders

Seth Dixon's insight:

CGP Grey's distinctive style helps to contextualizes some of the more odd and complicated parts of the Earth (but some find the rush of facts disorienting). If you want another example, watch Bizarre Borders, part 2 which focuses on the complexities of the US/Canadian border. 


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, CGP Grey.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, May 18, 2014 2:52 PM

Talk about landlocked!  How would you form policy for a country that is completely surrounded by another country?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:02 PM

APHG-U4

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:30 PM

nature, meaning, and function of boundaries - The most common boundaries are nation's borders. This video shows many landlocked or mostly surrounded states, that don't decisive as much freedom as states with many neighbors or open borders. These surrounded states value their borders and boundaries, because even if they are smaller or do not have as much freedom, they have their own state that they rule that is all theirs. The function of these borders as boundaries are to mark the edges of their state and to keep other states out.

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Bizarre Borders

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you want more of the same, watch Bizarre Borders, part 1 which focuses on countries within countries and single-neighbor countries.


Tags: borders, political, North America.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 2015 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:01 PM
before watching this video, to be very honest, I thought we really did have the longest straightest possible border between two countries. What really blows my mind is that there is literally a gap between the two countries signifying the border. Another one is the random tip of land that goes into Canada, but it is not really land, it is a lake. But by far, the most bizarre border to me is the Point Roberts in Alaska, where the high school students have to actually pass international borders just to go to school.
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London vs. The City of London

London and the City of London are the same political and territorial entity right? Of course not. Why have something simple when we can have a rich archaic legacy with a fascinating (albeit convoluted) history. Here’s a great political geography lesson just in time for the Olympic Ceremonies.

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Maddy Van Fossen's comment, September 3, 2012 2:28 PM
This video is short but gives lots of information. I found this video very interesting and I never knew there was a difference between the two cities. It's also very interesting that the two cities were formed at different times. Also, the way that Westminister grew around the city of london is cool, but the way the name Westminister changed to London is still confusing to me.
David Sanchez's comment, September 5, 2012 8:17 PM
I think that it's amazing that the City of London is still rich and powerful even after having been founded a few thousand years ago.
Valentia Pollard's comment, September 8, 2012 11:02 AM
I always thought that London was the same thing as the City of London. The only thing that they really have to do due with each other is the City of London is surrounded by London. Its cool that the City of London is still rich and powerful, they have their own flag, and even their own mayor. I think the City of London should be more important than it seems.
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What is a part of the United States?

Seth Dixon's insight:

While identifying most of the territory that is a part of the United States is fairly straightforward, the interesting political geography is in discussing the places that aren't straightforward, such as American Samoa, Puerto Rico and Palmyra Atoll. 


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, CGP Grey.

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, August 17, 2014 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:09 PM

I honestly feel like we are never taught about these areas ever in US schools. We are always drilled about the 50 states and that's it. I would be interested in learning the history behind why this is still the case and what is keeping our government from considering them part of the states. The fact that they wont even consider American Samoa's citizens is a disgrace.

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How Many Countries Are There?

Seth Dixon's insight:

What makes a country a country?  There isn't just one definition that is universally excepted as to what a country is; that make the first question even harder to answer.  Exploring these terms though is incredibly geographic and highlights some of the lesser known but fascinating places that are mired in geopolitical quandaries.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, CGP Grey.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:12 PM

This is one of those frequently asked questions in Geography class that sometimes results in increased confusion. The maker of this video has summed it up nicely.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:44 AM

What makes a country a country is if they play by the rules, of other soverin nations on a global scale and follow the rules. Most countries recieve taxes from their citizens, have a military and a recognized as a soverin. Not every body of land is a country but are also properties controlled by other countries. There are countries in the South Pacific. In North, South America, Europe, and Asia, and bevcause of politcal geopgrahpy nations sizes are changing often and new countries are usually created from theis process

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:44 AM

193....except........

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Holland vs the Netherlands

"What's the difference between Holland and the Netherlands?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is produced by the same gentleman that made the video that explains the difference between the terms Great Britain, England and the UK and another one that details why London is not the City of London. His style is to bombard you with facts which tell a rich story about the intricacies of place, power and culture.   


Tags: Netherlands, political, toponyms, historical

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Brett Sinica's comment, April 22, 2013 8:56 PM
I have seen this video previously, and this being my second time, it is much easier to understand this time around. He tells the story of one great kingdom and all areas that are under its control or influence. With the expansion of many European countries within the last couple centuries, I can understand how people can get culture and people mixed up, even though they’re from the same place to begin with. It reminds of the Arabs, or Arabic people. They don’t necessarily come from one country or one language or one religion. They represent a vast group of people and each of them differ or relate in certain ways. At times understanding these different groups can be a challenge, but in the end that is what makes them more unique and interesting.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 3:54 PM
Well this video was fairly interesting actually. Funnily enough, my Canadian friend made me watch the Great Britain video about a month ago and so when I saw this was made by the same person and I always seem to confuse Belgium/Netherlands/Holland it seemed like something I should think about doing. The video was very informational and the narrator went over many factual things including the simple question of: Where is everything? The video mainly focuses on physical geography of people but also goes on to explain that the ‘Dutch’ living in the Caribbean are actual ‘Europeans’ because they belong to the Kingdom of the Netherlands which belongs to the European Union which by the transitive property makes them Euros.

I liked what Brett said, that cultures and groups of people typically get categorized together as one when they really aren’t and it is important to acknowledge their distinctions and understand the different groups and cultures of people.
Opslagruimte Huren in Netherlands-Salland Storage's comment, February 2, 1:13 AM
bit.ly/1SAe8f4
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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics.