Geography Education
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Making Ethanol from Sugarcane

This segment highlights how sugarcane is processed into ethanol for fuel and other uses.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Sugarcane ethanol has proven to be one of the most environmentally safe alternative fuel sources. In addition to its green energy properties, sugarcane ethanol has fueled the Brazilian economy for over a decade. The Brazilian automotive industry have developed a complex, “Flex Fuel” engine that allows vehicles to run off of both gasoline and ethanol. Also, sugarcane ethanol has been one of their leading exports in the global economy. Due to recently discovered fuel deposits in Brazil and around the globe, there has been a decline in the need for sugarcane ethanol. This has negatively impacted the economy in addition to the Brazilian job market. But thanks to the engineering of cellulosic ethanol, Brazil is striving to become the green energy superpower yet again.

 

Questions to Ponder: Since cellulosic ethanol production is so expensive, do you think that will deter production and customers from purchasing it? Do you think that Brazil will ever become independent of fossil fuels as a result of their successful sugarcane ethanol production?

 

Tagsenergy, resourcespolitical ecologyagriculture, food production, land use, Brazil, South America.

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Irredeemable? Brazil's Faltering Economy

Irredeemable? Brazil's Faltering Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
THE longest recession in a century; the biggest bribery scandal in history; the most unpopular leader in living memory. These are not the sort of records Brazil was hoping to set in 2016, the year in which Rio de Janeiro hosts South America’s first-ever Olympic games.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Brazil's economy has gone through a rougher stretch than most in the recent global economic downturn and some see more hard times in the near future for the South American giant.  BRIC countries aren't immune to economic crisis. 

 

Tags: economic, BrazilSouth America.

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Cityscapes of Rio de Janeiro

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is geared for photographers, demonstrating the technical abilities of camera, but the images of the varied housing types and skylines of Rio de Janeiro are stunning.  To appreciate the favelas and Sugarloaf Mountains more fully, maximize the display and watch on the largest screen possible.   


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, neighborhood, landscape, time lapsevideo.

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Diana Zwart's curator insight, February 19, 2015 2:42 AM

#beautiful

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, February 20, 2015 2:37 PM

Magnifique timelapse

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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.


Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:16 AM

This shows just how important water is the human race. It also shows how humans have no sense of urgency in conserving water until it's too late. The saying "you never know a good thing until it's gone" applies in this case. The Brazilian government did not take any sufficient measures to conserve water until it realized how depleted the reservoir is. This event demonstrates the environmental impact of  water depletion on humans, and how humans have such a huge impact on the geographical landscape on Earth. As seen in the picture above, many greens turned yellow as a result of the lowering water levels. The river beds are soon going to be overgrown by shrubbery as water no longer exists there. These are all results of a combination of natural (lack of rain) and human causes of resource depletion.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:19 AM

water

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NASA and the World Cup

NASA and the World Cup | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"NASA goes to the World Cup! Satellite imagery from each country playing."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Not that we need any extra incentive to view NASA's gorgeous satellite imagery, but now that the World Cup has entered the knockout rounds, it is the perfect opportunity to view selected images from the participating countries.  This gallery of a dozen World Cup StoryMaps are but a few of the thousands of Esri StoryMaps that can serve as motivation to get your K-12 U.S. school an organizational account for ArcGIS online (then your students can make cool maps like these). 


Tags: sport, Brazil, South America, Esri, fun, mapping, remote sensing, geospatial, images, perspective.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 13, 2015 11:21 AM

This map was a virtual interactive map that shows satellite images from all of the countries playing in the World Cup. I loved this map not only because I am a soccer fan but it showed a different view of the participating countries. It was so interesting to see these countries from a satellite view because not many people are used to seeing these images. It was nice to be able to click on them and learn more about what each picture was showing. 

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Brazilian Geography Lessons

Brazilian Geography Lessons | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“The thing about football - the important thing about football -is that it is not just about football."

Seth Dixon's insight:

They eyes of the world will be turning to Brazil next month as the World Cup will be played in this South American country.  This is a perfect opportunity to pounce on student interest and teach them about Brazil, the urban geography and politics of hosting a major event such as this.  Follow the link for some lessons bound to garner student interest.  

 

Tags: sport, Brazil, South America.

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Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 1:02 PM

For those of you soccer fans, the upcoming World Cup and Olympics in 2016 will both be significant challenges for Brazil, considering both their political, economic, and urban challenges. Brazil was a bold choice for both events, but will they meet the challenge?

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, January 28, 2015 9:46 PM

This seems to be a great and fun way to get kids involved in learning something new.  It uses multiple ways to get kids to learn and remember at the same time while keeping it fun and interesting.  This could be used for many major sporting events around the world, including men and women world cups and the olympics.  It could also be used domestically to learn about different cities in America, specifically cities or regions that host the Super Bowl, World Series, or any other major sporting event.  Great geography and social studies tool.

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World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs produces easy-to-use population charts and graphs (including population pyramids).  This image (courtesy of Hans Rosling) shows the impending changes on Brazilian society based on changing fertility rates. How is this chart an example of population momentum and of the Demographic Transition Model? 


Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining populationmodels, Brazil.

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LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 2014 5:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:27 PM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2014 5:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

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Protests and the World Cup

Protests and the World Cup | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Fury, anarchy, martyrdom: Why the youth of Brazil are (forever) protesting, and how their anger may consume the World Cup.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Protests in public spaces are colliding with the Brazil's World Cup/Olympic dreams.  The government wants to show the world the best that the country has to offer and protestors are using this moment to highlight the social ills in their country and some of the collateral damages of these major sporting events.  This may not seem like a sports issue per se, but one of social unrest that happens to be more highly publicized because of the coming international sporting events to Brazil.  Many see the money that went to constructing massive stadiums as money that bypassed those that needed it most and the poor neighborhoods (favelas) that were demolished to make way for an 'ideal city' that the world would see.  The world's eye is on Brazil and both sides know it.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 3:01 PM

When construction was occurring for the World Cup, a friend of mine was teaching in an extremely poor area of Brazil.  Seeing his pictures compare to the ones on ESPN really opened my eyes to the immense poverty gap.  Yes, soccer is major for Brazil and is extremely profitable however we see here a moral issue.  Billions spent on something as trivial as a sport, when millions are living in extreme poverty. Regardless of how serious people are about sports at the end of the day it means nothing when the country is comfortable with using billions to fund a recreation rather than feed their own people.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 30, 2015 9:44 PM

I am proud of the people of Brazil for having the courage to speak up. This is their time to hopefully get some justice. It is shameful how imprisoned in poverty some of the natives of Brazil are. I am not big on watching the news but this i heard about. It also reminds me of how China was putting up the fake beautifully painted backdrops up around the cities for tourists to take pictures in front of so they wouldn't see the actual smog that was surrounding them. Essentially Brazil is trying to do the same thing. Trying to create a illusion of a great city, and its deceiving.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 11:47 AM

Not that I favor this, because i do not know the situation there but I understand that this is a perfect time to protest these ill feelings of social, economical, and political corruption. The whole world is indeed watching and this is what Venezuela was complaining about, that the media is owned and operated by the government so it dictates what gets heard and what doesn't. So these people of Brazil are trying to take advantage of the situation. Of course the people who have invested large sums of money into the world cup are disturbed by this and want it to go away but in reality at the expense of these civilian protesters there will be a large sum of deaths caused by the military forces as you can see in this picture is about to happen. Even the soccer fans who have no worries in the world will look at this large protest as an inconvenience and will complain that these protesters are irrational. I thought history was to learn from and fix the mistakes and leave what works well alone. My question is are all these protests globally really the fault of the protesters everywhere or is there really a problem?

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Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps

Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
RIO DE JANEIRO — Look at most maps of Rio de Janeiro. The beaches are easy to spot, as are the iconic ocean-front neighborhoods of Copacabana and Ipanema. In the middle is a vast forest.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A nonprofit organization run by current and former favela residents called Redes da Mare has started the first mapping program to systematically chart out the favelas for municipal governments.  We take for granted what having an address on a named street means in a modern society; it is a portal to public utilities, recognition with businesses and countless other social benefits.  Being left 'off the map' is synonymous with being left behind.  By finding their way on the city maps they are removing some of the social stigma that sought to treat them as if they did not exist.  


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, mapping

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Caterin Victor's comment, January 26, 2013 2:06 PM
Even the shanty-towns are beautiful in Brazil
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 3:06 PM

Being left off the map is ludicrous.  It should be surprising how many there are,what they pick for addresses, and population statistics. Hopefully this will also help them to get aid for poverty relief.

 

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The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012

The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
2012 has had many stories around the globe have grabbed the headlines with their shocking tales.  Some of the most important shifts in the world however are incremental processes that happen slowly...


This article from Foreign Policy shares some great global stories that may end up impacting the coming years as well:  


1) India and Pakistan start trading more

2) Brazil becomes an immigration destination

3) Inuits strike it rich

4) A tropical disease nearly eradicated

5) The copyright wars go 3-D

6) The end of the Indian call center (Philippines)

7) Hong Kong fights back

8) Moscow on the Med (Cyprus)

9) Oil discoveries in Central Africa

10) Island dispute between Iran and UAE

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 9:57 AM

What was missed in the news?  Take a look at some of the stories from around the world!

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Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade

Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade | Geography Education | Scoop.it
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — South American engineers are trying to tackle one of the continent's greatest natural challenges: the towering Andes mountain chain that creates a costly physical barrier for...


At the NCGE conference, noted author Harm De Blij mentioned a daring project that would link Eastern South America with the Pacific as engineers were planning to tunnel under the Andes mountains.  Here is a link to an article on this intermodal transportation project that would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic.  Government officials in both Argentina and Brazil have described the  project as a matter of "national interest."  


Tags: transportation, LatinAmerica, globalization, industry, economic, development, unit 6 industry.

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Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 12:54 PM

This is a great idea for a region that has the need to travel so much through such a tough area. Even if it will cost a lot of money to accomplish, in the long run it will save more than it costs to build.  This could change so much, and really boost their economies. Not only would it speed up shipping time and lower shipping costs, but it would allow more shipping to be done which means more business throughout the entire year as opposed to the situation now with snow getting in the way. Not only would it effect that aspect of the economy but it would also produce jobs for the time of the work being done, which is never a bad thing.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:19 AM

If this project can be accomplished, it would truly be one of the greatest engineering feats in human history. To build a railroad tunnel through the Andes mountains seems impossible, but in all likelihood with the right amount of funding, it can be done. The tunnel would have great economic benefits for both Brazil and Argentina. Goods from both countries could be shipped in both directions with out any issues. The larger world would also benefit from the train tunnel. It is estimated that the tunnel would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic. The entire global trading market would benefit from this development.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:44 PM
Doing something such as this is a brilliant move in engineering. Making a tunnel through the Andes will connect countries together, make shipping much easier and doing so may cut the cost of goods being shipped and received. Just like the Panama Canal increased the cargo freight lining industry for shipping, this will also increase an industry for railways,.
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Eduardo Paes: The 4 commandments of cities

TED Talks Eduardo Paes is the mayor of Rio de Janeiro, a sprawling, complicated, beautiful city of 6.5 million.

 

What should city planners be doing to maintain a vibrant city?  The Mayor of Rio de Janeiro explains his vision for cities and city management for the future. 

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Brazil's disappearing favelas

Brazil's disappearing favelas | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Infrastructure demanded by the sporting world's most powerful corporate interests render families homeless in Brazil.

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Erica Tommarello's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:52 PM

FIFA 2014 is being hosted in Brazil. This article details the completely flawed and inhumane plan that Brazil has to get ready for the madness of FIFA. They seem to be too caught up in artificial aesthetic and have lost focus on development, while displacing thousands of poor Brazilians on the way.

Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, July 15, 2014 3:21 AM

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:04 PM

With the world cup and summer Olympics being hosted in Brazil, the government are forcing people out of favelas to improve their image for tourists. What is frustrating about this is that bringing in a large sporting event like the Olympics and world cup actually looses money for the hosting country. So in their haste they are damaging the country twice over. First the government of Brazil is creating thousands of displaced and poor citizens, and on top of that they are spending valuable resources on preparing for a sporting event that will not turn a profit. What will happen after 2016, when you have a massive population of desperate homeless people migrating back to the favelas.

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OTL: The promise Rio couldn't keep

OTL: The promise Rio couldn't keep | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rio de Janeiro's bid for the Summer Games featured an official commitment to cleaner waters. But with less than six months to go, trash and contamination continue to lurk.
Seth Dixon's insight:

ESPN is covering this topic only because of the upcoming Olympics, but underneath the veneer of a sports article are some weighty geographic issues that loom large for Brazil.  

 

Tags: pollution, economic, Brazil, South America, urban ecology, sport.

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derangedmanaged's comment, February 19, 1:51 AM
Terrific...!!
Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 23, 12:34 PM

ESPN is covering this topic only because of the upcoming Olympics, but underneath the veneer of a sports article are some weighty geographic issues that loom large for Brazil.  

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As South Carolina deals with its Confederate flag, one town in Brazil flies it with pride

As South Carolina deals with its Confederate flag, one town in Brazil flies it with pride | Geography Education | Scoop.it
After the Civil War, members of the Confederacy fled to Brazil. Their ancestors still live in the region and continue to fly the Confederate flag.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While people debate why the southern states actually seceded, there are many who still honor what they see as the gallantry of genteel southern society in the Southern Hemisphere.  It is important to note that Brazil was chosen as the home of this 'Confederacy in Exile' because it was the last western country to abolish slavery (1888 it ended there too).  Here is another article discussing the the Brazilian enclaves of 'Confederados,' or children of the unreconstructed South.   


Tags: Brazil, historicalthe Southlandscape.

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Rebecca Cofield's curator insight, August 5, 2015 6:25 PM

While people debate why the southern states actually seceded, there are many who still honor what they see as the gallantry of genteel southern society in the Southern Hemisphere.  It is important to note that Brazil was chosen as the home of this 'Confederacy in Exile' because it was the last western country to abolish slavery (1888 it ended there too).  Here is another article discussing the the Brazilian enclaves of 'Confederados,' or children of the unreconstructed South.   

 

Tags: Brazil, historical, the South, landscape.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:56 PM

While people debate why the southern states actually seceded, there are many who still honor what they see as the gallantry of genteel southern society in the Southern Hemisphere.  It is important to note that Brazil was chosen as the home of this 'Confederacy in Exile' because it was the last western country to abolish slavery (1888 it ended there too).  Here is another article discussing the the Brazilian enclaves of 'Confederados,' or children of the unreconstructed South.   

 

Tags: Brazil, historical, the South, landscape.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:38 AM

The debate over the causes for the Civil War are always amusing. The main cause for the war was undoubtedly the issue of slavery. The souths  desperate attempts to hold on to the institution of slavery caused them to secede from the union. All of the major controversies between the north and the south  before the actual war involved slavery in one form or another. The Missouri Compromise or Bleeding Kansas would be just a few examples of that cause. I can understand the urge of southerners to want to celebrate their heritage. The problem is, they are celebrating a history that never existed. To describe the Civil War as an honorable gentile cause to beet back northern aggression is just not history, it is myth. I was to surprised to see Confederate celebrations in Brazil. Though, sense they were the last nation in this Hemisphere  to abolish slavery, it makes sense that some confederates would have fled there following the end of the war. Even more surprising was the fact that these heritage celebrations are biracial.  The power of myth can sway many people to a particular celebration or cause.

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Brazil and Europe

Brazil and Europe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Brazil...because it's bigger than you might think. 


Tags: Brazil, South America, mapimages, perspective.

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 20, 2015 7:59 PM

I would say. Just imagine three mega cities like Rio de Janeiro, population 11,960,000 then Buenos Aires with a population of 13,530,000 and finally Sao Paulo with the Southern Hemisphere's largest metropolitan area with a population of 19,920,000 with 2 more Mega cities to be added by 2025.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, November 24, 2015 11:52 AM

I cannot believed the size of Brazil is at this scale because we don't hear a lot about it as being a world power. It shows that even though the country is this big, most of the land is uninhabitable due to the forests and geography of the land. In addition, from history class one cannot imagine a small country like Portugal controlled a big country as Brazil from the colonial times. Seeing this map with all these European countries inside of it with some space leftover, one can see the massive size of this South American country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:47 PM
This link to show me a picture of Europe fitting in Brazil is astounding! I never realized how large this country was until it was put together like a puzzle for me. For a single country to be that large that you would be able to fit an entire continent inside is absurd. That really goes to show that looks can be deceiving.
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Brazil's ethanol revolution

"United Nations, June 2008 - The bio-fuel, ethanol, is generating a revolution in renewable energy that could help reduce the world's thirst for oil. In Brazil, the production of ethanol from sugarcane is booming, but what is not clear is the impact it is having on the industry's sugarcane cutters."  Transcript of video available here.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Although ethanol is working well for Brazil, there is a growing literature supporting the idea that wide-scale ethanol production is not sustainable or environmentally beneficial.  This is a great example to demonstrate that economic and environmental policies are locally dependent on geographic factors and are not universally transferable.  Click here for a simple explanation of the differences in the economic and environmental differences in the production of sugar and corn-based ethanol.  


Tagsenergy, resourcespolitical ecologyagriculture, food production, land use, Brazil, South America.

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Patty B's curator insight, November 10, 2015 5:19 PM

S. AMERICA SCOOP:

The 'ethanol revolution' occurring in Brazil is a critical topic to examine in terms of global geography. With it's ethanol export rising 70% as of 2007-08, and with an abundance of sugarcane, Brazil is now beginning to offer an alternative to tradition fuels (especially for cars). Brazil is exporting a great deal of ethanol which is stimulating its economy, but there is a negative side to this energy boom. It's causing a great deal of unemployment in Brazil due to the mechanization of the process of sugarcane cultivation. The effects of a country or region's main commodity always goes under this mechanization process, it just depends on when the need for that commodity arises (this kind of relates to "Guns, Germs, and Steel" and the idea of determinism).

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 1:01 PM
This sounds like something that people need to learn from, making fuel from sugar and alcohol. It is said that because of this Brazil is a world leader in in this sector. Doing so reduces emissions making a cleaner environment. This is future. .Doing things such as this and making machine mechanized cutters is good too, because now humans do not have to do it. When humans by hand get the sugar they have to burn plants, and burning plants pollutes the air because of the fire and the fire can cause severe destruction if it gets out of hand. With hand picking going out, it will be better overall. Delivering ethanol to the rest of the world is believed to lift the developing world out of poverty. .
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:43 PM

Although ethanol is working well for Brazil, there is a growing literature supporting the idea that wide-scale ethanol production is not sustainable or environmentally beneficial.  This is a great example to demonstrate that economic and environmental policies are locally dependent on geographic factors and are not universally transferable.  Click here for a simple explanation of the differences in the economic and environmental differences in the production of sugar and corn-based ethanol.  

 

Tagsenergy, resources, political ecology, agriculture, food production, land use, Brazil, South America.

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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a wide economic gap between the rich and the poor and in the spatial layout of urban settlements. Often an accompanying  tangible separation exists between the communities where these groups live.  These images (captured by a helicopter pilot with a keen eye for iconic and cultural landscapes in Mexico City) show neighborhoods in Mexico where this separation does not exist.   Collectively they are reminiscent of this famous photograph in Brazil that shows the uneasy juxtaposition of favelas and luxurious housing. 


Questions to Ponder: What are these neighborhoods like?  How are these two communities linked and separated?  Compare and contrast life on both sides of the fence.    


Tags:  housingeconomic, socioeconomicBrazil, urban, squatter, neighborhood, Mexico

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.

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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.


Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, narcotics, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:41 AM

unit 7

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:29 AM

I believe that absolutely no one is surprised that right before an international event, the hosting city is cracking down on its problem areas. I am skeptical of the Brazilin governments  promise to develop the long neglected Favelas. After Rio finishes hosting the 2016 Summer games, the government will once again neglect the Favelas. There will no longer be an incentive for the government to care about the favelas. The eyes of the world will be off the  city and things can return to normal. The only losers in this equation are the actual residents of these slums. Once again the promise of better days will ripped  from them. An added injury is that there informal economy will have been destroyed. While life in an informal economy is hard by any measure, it is still a way of making a living. The increased police presence will destroy that way of life and replace it with empty promises.  

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Walled World

Walled World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an in-depth, multi-media interactive that explores the political, economic and cultural implications of borders that are heavily fortified or militarized (I found this too late to be included in the "best posts of 2013" list, but this will be the first to include for 2014).  Not all of these borders are political; in Brazil it explores the walls that separate different socioeconomic groups and in Northern Ireland they look at walls dividing religious groups.  The interactive examines various borders including U.S./Mexico, Morocco, Syria, India/Bangladesh, Brazil, Israel, Greece/Turkey, Northern Ireland, North/South Korea and Spain The overarching questions are these: why are we building new walls to divide us?  What are the impacts of these barriers?

  

Tags: borders, political, territoriality, unit 4 political.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:53 PM

The video attached to this article reminded me made me think "racism". It is not Americas first time targeting one cultural group and antagonizing them. We did it to the Indians, Jews, at one time we denied Chinese immigrants the right to enter the country or become a citizen. The projection of walls in my opinion only creates more room for crime. I would love to research what benefits its had. I think the world is lacking the understand that people are people .period. This segregation and division is so unnecessary and creates wars, tension, hostility, and divide.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:41 AM

the social impact is we do not get to mingle with people of different culture, religion, ethnicity. Economically businesses do not grow at least on the small business side. There is no chance of growth. what about population once again if you stay with in a section divided by walls then the population stays within. a society would have to stay above the 2.06 fertility rate to keep their population stable.

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Brazil: Protests & Demonstrations

Brazil: Protests & Demonstrations | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Protests are ongoing in Brazil as people took to demonstrating against high World Cup spending....the unrest is the worst the nation has seen in two decades."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The origins of the protests were based on hikes in public transit fares, but a movement of general discontent began, with many voices and multiple perspectives.  While the World Cup is a rallying point, many argue that it isn't the World Cup they are angry about, but corruption and social inequality.  FIFA is starting to think of contingency plans if protests continue and threaten the World Cup.  The lack of clear leadership some feel is the reason why the protest have lost some steam in July as stated in this NPR podcast.  This photo essay of the protest movement with a gallery of 39 photos is quite intriguing.  


Tags: sport, Brazil, images, South America.

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 8:07 PM

With all eyes on Brazil, the country is showing the world that it is more than just the world cup. Having protests in the media, Brazil is seen as a more than just a country with beautiful scenery and one with unrest due to political corruption and tax increases that effect the entire country.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 8:49 AM

These pictures show the other side of something that most of the world was looking forward to and enjoys. Just as with the Sochi Olympics, the World Cup in Brazil was not only an international event that was internationally important, but it was a local event for Brazilians as well, that had real impacts on their lives. Unfortunately, governments and corporations often fail to recognize or choose to ignore the ramifications of their enterprises on the everyday citizen. On the flip side of increased revenue in the form of tourism and foreign investment is increased government spending and likely higher taxes to fund an event that many Brazilians may not have even been able to attend. 

 

So while Brazil was the center of international attention, at least for a short time, the media did not show the rest of the world the unrest and unhappiness in the country. Instead, they focused on what teams might be playing in the World Cup and which team would likely win. They did not discuss or mention the protests that occurred because it would not bring in the desired ratings or money. The media, therefore, helped to facilitate a disconnect between global and local. In a global context, Brazil was the host of the World Cup and was preparing for one of the most important events in the most popular sport in the world. In a local context, however, Brazil was a nation rife with unrest regarding high government spending on an a sports tournament. That money could likely have been better spent somewhere else, but since that would not have fulfilled the immediate desires and goals of the Brazilian government, ordinary Brazilians were forced to suffer the consequences. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 1:15 PM

this is insane. the government is spending money they don't really have on events which should be considered something which comes after insuring your people are taken care of. this riot is totally understandable as the government is failing to use money from these peoples taxes to insure that they have basic amenities. this is growing more sickening as time goes on.

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Favela Images

Favela Images | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.
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Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, images, urban ecology.  

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:48 AM

These images of the favelas are both breathtaking and heartbreaking. Breathtaking in the sense that these aerial images show the scale of the entire neighborhood. You begin to get an appreciation for how large these favelas actually are. The amount of people living in this area is remarkable. The image is also extremely heartbreaking. I can only imagine the everyday problems and issue that the residents of these slums face. In the nations so called festive city, I see little reason for these people to celebrate. These are the forgotten people of the brazilin economic boom. They are the ones who the government would not like anyone to know about. Sadness and aw some up my reaction to this photo.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:57 AM
Just seeing images like this make me feel sad that there are people out there living the way they do. Favelas can be defined as the "slums" or ghettos. Favelas are built on hillsides and they tend to have very poor history with the police. Since the favelas are considered to be the slum area, the government provides very little assistance, and if you were to visit the favelas, you could find for example some very poor and dangerous wiring from the local people wire-tapping.
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:42 PM

This is an incredible favela village in South America. It shows how densely the population of slums are and how they are built up on the hillside. Most favelas are built on the side if the hills which are the most unstable portions because they can't afford to have a better place in the valley and away from the mudslide and avalanche areas. Great depiction of the slums.

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2014 World Cup: Will Brazil Be Ready?

ESPN Video: With the FIFA World Cup two years away, will Brazil be ready to host soccers premiere event?


This short sports documentary (12 minutes) looks at some of the socioeconomic and urban planning issues that are a part of the logistics for a country to prepare for a sporting event on the magnitude of the World Cup.  The discussion of demolitions in the favelas (squatter settlements) is especially intriguing.  Major sporting events of this magnitude that last for two weeks can reshape local geographic patterns for decades.  


Tags: sport, Brazil, planning, squatter.

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 1, 2013 5:11 PM

I know my soccer, and I know Brazil knows its soccer considering the country has one of the richest histories in the world.  The nation eats, sleeps, and breathes the beautiful game and to host a World Cup right now is immaculate timing.  Some of the best players (possibly ever) in the world would be playing next year, all from star-studded nations.  The forecast for this spectacle will surely be one of the best in history, but that's if it all goes to plan.  There's been many videos and articles of Brazil coming into more problems than solutions.  Repairing and even building new stadiums have set back schedules and have even angered many locals.  In some cities, there have been cases of gentrification, places such as favelas have fell victim.  Being such a passionate fan of the sport, it's almost upsetting that all of these people are being misplaced to house the tournament which has been anxiously waited on since 2010.  The main picture says it all with the three hands covered in blood...  A nation which cares so much about a sport, where it is a way of life and prosperity, is in fact doing more harm than good in some areas.  In the end I hope Brazil can get back on schedule, and leave as little people harmed in the process so the world can enjoy one of the greatest sporting events come summer of 2014.

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:16 AM

The World Cup is getting closer and all eyes are on Brazil. The Favelas are seeing the worst of it. To improve their country for it's soon to be influx of tourists, the Favelas are going through practically forced renovations. Not to mention safety hazards in Brazil are being pushed to the limits with the building anf remidelling of the soccer stadiums. Just last month 2 construction workers part of the rebuilding were killed by an accident. The question is especially true. Will Brazil be ready? Soccer fans around the globe sure hope so.

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Sustainable Urbanism

"Jaime Lerner reinvented urban space in his native Curitiba, Brazil. Along the way, he changed the way city planners worldwide see what’s possible in the metropolitan landscape.  From building opera houses with wire to mapping the connection between the automobile and your mother-in-law, Jaime Lerner delights in discovering eccentric solutions to vexing urban problems. In the process he has transformed the face of cities worldwide."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Jaime Lerner does not see cities as the problem; he sees urbanism as the solution to many global problems.  This video outlines practical plans to rethink the city to be more sustainable.  Click here to see the trailer for a documentary about the urban changes in Curitiba, Brazil. 

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 2014 11:47 AM

This video is enlightening.  The speaker uses the city as a model for fixing problems in the world.  Instead of seeing the city as an enemy to environmentalism, he purposes changing the cities and reworking old sites like quarries into something that is useable today.  He also advocates the integration of the transportation systems to make commuting more feasible as well as less pollution generating. 

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Brazil Faces Obstacles in Preparations for Rio Olympics

Brazil Faces Obstacles in Preparations for Rio Olympics | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ambitious development plans for the 2016 Summer Olympics, as well as the 2014 soccer World Cup, involve large-scale evictions from numerous slums, whose residents are refusing to leave.

 

The urban revitalization issues in Rio de Janiero are not new, but they will intensify in global importance (or at least coverage) as the time for the World Cup and Olympics approaches.  What are the aesthetics and economics behind revitalization?  What are the social issues that should be addressed?  

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Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 2014 11:41 AM

With the Olympics comes countries trying to hide all their dirty secrets that they don't want the world to see. It's easy to say that money shouldn't be spent on creating a large stadium and instead to help the impoverished, but it should also be recognized that with the Olympics comes a huge boost in jobs and tourism for the country.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 2014 10:33 AM

This article highlights the problem facing Brazil when the country needs to build new facilities to host the Olympics and World Cup.  The clash between the government and poor people who are squatting on land they do not own causes much stress and unrest.  How the country comes to resolve these issues are important for the people in the future.  The fact that people are being displaced is sad and perhaps not fair however, on the other hand, these people are squatters and built their homes on land they did not own and have no infrastructure which is also dangerous and a public safety issue.  The unrest over this issue will cause a pale over the games to be held in Brazil.

Kayla, Sean, and Max's curator insight, February 24, 2015 1:25 PM

Max

The coming of the 2016 Rio de Janiero Olympic Games requires the building of many stadiums for the games, as well as hotels, restaurants, stores, etc. for the tourist traveling to see the games. This not only is causing gentrification but is also causing mass eviction as the government is forcing people to leave the slums to make room for the new buildings.