Geography Education
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Defining 'the South'

Defining 'the South' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Southerners were considerably more certain of which states are their own. While the top few Midwest states barely pulled 80 percent of the vote, nearly 90 percent of respondents identified Georgia and Alabama as Southern, and more than 80 percent placed Mississippi and Louisiana in the South. South Carolina, Tennessee, Florida and North Carolina all garnered above 60 percent."


Via Seth Dixon
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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 10:40 PM

When I think of states that constitute as being a part of southern United States, I think of VA, NC, SC, GA, MS, AL, LA, TX, and FL. I never thought of KY as being a state a part of the south. Although its geographical location demonstrate it being relatively close to being in the south, I always thought of KY being a Midwest because of the weather similarities with states that are located in the Midwest.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 22, 2014 8:08 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspective of geography 

This map is a map of the p.o.v. of a surveyed group stating what they think the south is. They answered with suprising accuracy overall with some outliers. This map shows the stereotypes of the area that people deem it.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows a perceptual map of an area that isn't truly defined. This is a perceptual map because of its undefined borders and a level of accuracy at the personal level.

 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:37 PM
As someone who had a summer home in Orlando, Florida, and having friends and family there too, we would occasionally have the discussion what we considered the South. For myself, I always had the idea that the south was from North Carolina to Florida and from Florida as far west as Texas. As for the deep south, I would consider Alabama, Georgia and Florida to be the deep south. I have a friend currently stationed at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina and he considers NC and anything under to be the South.
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Brazilian police retake streets

Brazilian police retake streets | Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Coach Frye's insight:

Favelas in Rio de Janeiro are home to close to 1.5 million people.  Most of these slums are controlled by large street gangs.  With the 2016 Summer Olympics soon to be in Rio the Brazilian government has sent police and marines to retake the streets.  A power struggle is taking place between the Brazilian gangs and Brazilian police forces.  Many people who live in these slums are unsure of who is actually in control.

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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Coach Frye's insight:

In 21 years Dubai has grown from an almost empty desert area to a thriving metropolis.

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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 2014 4:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

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33 Unbelievable Places To Visit

33 Unbelievable Places To Visit | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"So many other-worldly places exist right on our planet, and we never even knew about it. Here are 33 landmarks that look like paintings and scenes from science fiction movies."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 2014 4:40 PM

I'm afraid that if nothing on this list can inspire you with a desire to see more of the world and travel, then we probably just will never be friends.  Some of these places are simply amazing.  I would be incredibly jealous of anyone who's been to more than five of these spots (I've only got one under my belt).  

Mrs. B's curator insight, April 3, 2014 7:13 AM

Which is your favorite?

Mary Elizabeth's curator insight, August 31, 2014 1:24 PM

Visuals will reinforce to students how little we really know about the world in which we live.

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Text Messages Aim to Save Lives in Flood Prone Africa

Text Messages Aim to Save Lives in Flood Prone Africa | Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Coach Frye's insight:

Millions of people in Africa do not have access to television, internet, or radio but many now have cellular phones.  This early-warning text-messaging system could help save lives in areas that are prone to flooding.  Also, this could be used in other parts of the world prone to all types of natural disasters.

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Seeing These Famous Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them Forever

Seeing These Famous Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them Forever | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...
Coach Frye's insight:

These photos of famous landmarks give a different perspective of how the world around them has changed.

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Richest Countries in the World - Top Ten

Richest Countries in the World - Top Ten | Geography Education | Scoop.it
List of top 10 richest countries in the world according to their GDP with map. Qatar is the richest country in the world followed by Luxembourg, Singapore, etc.
Coach Frye's insight:

The richest countries are not always the largest countries...

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25 Most Scariest Places on Earth

25 Most Scariest Places on Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 2014 9:54 AM

Some of these are shrouded in mystery, haunted stories or strange geologic formations.  Many of these would be a great place to visit; others I would avoid at all costs.  Which ones would you like to go to?

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, April 22, 2014 4:17 PM

Death zone, Mt. Everest, Nepal: 13 people died hear recently

Death zone, Mt. Everest, Nepal

See More : http://news-hound.co/25-most-scariest-places-on-earth/Death zone, Mt. Everest, Nepal

See More : http://news-hound.co/25-most-scariest-places-on-earth/
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Sochi is a ghost town already

Sochi is a ghost town already | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Coach Frye's insight:

It doesn't take long for Olympic venues to become ghost towns once the Olympics are over.

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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:28 PM

The yellow represents desert and with no rainfall what are you going to grow. the white area is the area that gets plenty of rain, good farmland for raising livestock, excellent natural harbors and resources. the yellow upper part probably is not desert but I bet its cold up there.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:08 PM

this seems like the same sort of situation that Egypt has, it seems like a good sized area but the large deserts make most of it uninhabitable, the country's livable space is much less than you would think.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:17 PM
What we have here is a representation of the desert area that only 2% of the population lives in, this is because to sustain life, you need high amounts of water to grow food which will never happen here and then the white being the mainly inhabited areas. These areas are mainly inhabited because of sufficient rainfall which makes agriculture good and good enough to sustain populations of people.
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What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine

What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In symbolic terms, it's a huge loss. The Crimean Peninsula holds an important place in the region's history, and the inability to prevent the region from joining Russia is a serious test of leadership for the new Ukrainian government in Kiev.

In practical terms, however, what Crimea means for Ukraine is less clear. In an article last week, The Post's Will Englund noted that Crimea may end up costing Russia more than it might like. And what does Ukraine really lose?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 2014 12:35 PM

We often view global affairs through our own little prism, considering how it affects us.  So much of the discussion has revolved around Russia and the West in general (and the U.S. specifically), that Ukraine almost gets lost in the shuffle.  All this amid news that the acting Ukrainian Foreign Minister has said that the possibility of war "is growing."

Tag: Ukraine, political, conflict, devolution.

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Trans-Dniester pleads to join Russia

Trans-Dniester pleads to join Russia | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Pro-Russian politicians and activists in Moldova's breakaway Trans-Dniester region have asked the Russian parliament to draft a law that would allow their territory to join Russia.


Via Seth Dixon
Coach Frye's insight:

The Trans-Dniester region functions as a working state, but is not internationally recognized as such.  Members of this region are hoping Russia will annex them for political and economic stability.

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Albert Jordan's curator insight, March 18, 2014 4:15 PM

What is amusing here is that the U.S. and its European allies will be quick to support nations that benefit them when those peoples wish to rise up "on their own," but when a nation that wants Russian support during their own "choice" it is "illegal" and against international law. What makes a country follow international law anyways? There are not many powers that could militarily force another nation to other than the U.S., the EU, Russia and China. Economically it is generally the same people who have the military might.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 1:08 PM

A nation that is not internationally recognized, Trans-Dniester reflect how borders are subject to changed based on cultural differences. The region identifies with Russia more than it does with Moldova. After the USSR broke up, the borders were created without considering demographic and cultural makeup of each region of the new states. With the Ukraine and with Trans-Dniester we see how many eastern European regions still identify with Russia. As Russia seems more willing to expand, many borders are likely to change in the area.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 1, 2015 8:10 PM

This situation only further complicates Eastern European dynamics.  One thing that stood out to me after reading this aritcle is the reality that anti-Russian Ukraine is sandwiched between pro-Russian eastern Ukraine and pro-Russian eastern Moldova.  This situation can only get uglier.

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'Noah' will not debut in much of Muslim world

'Noah' will not debut in much of Muslim world | Geography Education | Scoop.it
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Among Muslims, depictions of any prophets are shunned to avoid worship of a person rather than God. Many Muslim majority countries also criminalize blasphemy.

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For Ukraine, Losing Crimea Might be No Loss

For Ukraine, Losing Crimea Might be No Loss | Geography Education | Scoop.it
By the end of this month, it is likely that Vladimir Putin’s Russia will fully control Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula. And it is clear that he aspires to much more.

Via Seth Dixon
Coach Frye's insight:

Russian control of Crimea, and Vladimir Putin's plans for the future.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:27 AM

According to this article, Ukraine will be fine economically with Crimea being pinched off, but Crimea and Russia would suffer from an annexation