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Geography Education
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Mapping the World's Problems

Mapping the World's Problems | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Google Earth Engine works with scientists by using satellite imagery to provide data visualizations for environmental and health issues.

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Todd Hallsten's comment, February 13, 10:39 PM
I like the idea of this map because it allows for the comparison of logged forest to preserved forest. Allowing for facts not rumored amount of trees producing air, i would really like to see a map of alaska..
Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 16, 12:23 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

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For Florists, Roses A Nerve-Racking Business Around Valentines Day

For Florists, Roses A Nerve-Racking Business Around Valentines Day | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Valentines Day is this one day when one product — a red rose — is worth two or three times more than it is at any other time of the year. If a florist catches that window, he's golden. But the process of getting the roses to is fraught with risk, middlemen, crazy expense and bad weather.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 8:47 AM

This NPR podcast looks at the economic fluctuations of the flower market based on the cultural festival that is Valentines Day, and this Guardian article examines the economic development issues in the commodity chain for cut flowers (focused on Colombia). 

Nicky Mohan's curator insight, February 14, 7:07 PM

Valentines day followed by Mother's day and Father's day etc etc

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 16, 1:03 AM

International dependency. Economics and Business. A clever way to bring many dimensions into one by following the flower market. 

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Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"The position [that belief in God is essential to morality] is highly prevalent, if not universal, in Africa and the Middle East. At least three-quarters in all six countries surveyed in Africa say that faith in God is essential to morality.   People in richer nations tend to place less emphasis on the need to believe in God to have good values than people in poorer countries do."


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 7:37 PM

It would make sense that Indonesia is one of the most religious countries in the world being that it has the highest Muslim population. Also, I never thought of Europe as being religious countries which is why I am not surprised that 70% of Europe does not believe that the belief in God needs to be moral. Another reason why I am not surprised is because they are more popular for their ethnic groups such as the french group, italian group and german group. Also, they don't have focused religions. For example, Buddhism was originated in Nepal and worshipped mostly in China, Hinduism was originated in India, Jewish was originated in Israel and Islam was originated in Saudi Arabia and it's practiced mostly in Indonesia and Pakistan. That explains why most parts of Asia (at least southern Asia) has practices specific religions.

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 27, 11:58 PM

Summary- This figure explains the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. Only is Europe does God seem less important than the rest of the world. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study the distributions of many things, religion included. Why do so many poorer countries have a stronger faith in God than wealthier ones? It may be because if their ethnic backgrounds, but I think there is more to it. I think when a country is poorer, more people reach out to their God for help. I also think that in wealthier countries there are distractions from religion such as video games and other mass produced technologies that get in the way of people researching their faith.

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 9:55 AM

Unit 3: This article shows the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

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Endangered Wildlife Trust

Endangered Wildlife Trust | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"If you don't pick it up they will."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 19, 12:03 PM

I found this ad from the Endangered Wildlife Trust to be very powerful.  It is a good introduction to systems and systems thinking.  

 

Tags: pollutionsustainability, environment, resources, water, coastal.

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If Roads Were Like Bike Lanes

If Roads Were Like Bike Lanes | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
For those brief moments that you happen to be in a bike lane, biking in the city is wonderful. But it always seems that bike lanes end before they even begin, just like a summer romance or a slice ...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 10, 2014 9:14 AM

It's just a joke, but good comedy has a nugget of truth that shines a light on the inconsistencies of the human experience.  This really highlights the priorities given to various modes of transportation as we allocate public space for them. 


Tags: transportation, planning.

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada

Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"Canada: land-wise, it's one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, it's anything but.The map comes from the Government of Canada's 'Plant Hardiness Site,' which contains images showing 'Extreme Minimum Temperature Zones' throughout the Great White North."

 

Tags: Canada, map, North America, weather and climate.


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 10:50 AM

This map and commentary is meant to put Canada's population-to-land ratio in perspective and a reason why the low ratio has developed.  Canada, although among the biggest landmasses out of any country in the world, is not heavily populated due, in large part, to its physical characteristics.  As the map shows, temperatures in most locations of the country are not conducive to plant-life.  Whereas agriculture is not the end-all be-all for human-life, the capability of growing crops definitely plays a factor in where populations were and are willing to cluster. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 6:25 PM

 While Canada is very cold during the winter, to say that people shouldn't live there because plants don't might be a little excessive.  These temperatures are clearly only in the winter time and are extreme lows.  Canada in the summertime is quite beautiful, has plenty of vegetation and is probably very pleasant and comfortable to live.  Just like people who live in very hot, uncomfortable areas, i'm sure the inhabitants of Canada adapt to the colder season and take great pride in where they live.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 1:18 PM

It's a little strange to think that one of the world's largest countries in terms of area does not boast a very large population. Then again, when we think of Russia (the largest country by area in the world), many of its regions are uninhabited as well because of extreme climatic conditions. Countries like India, China, and Brazil, however, have enormous populations because they are located in more temperate zones, and so almost every area of the country is habitable.  There are places in every country, however, that are uninhabitable due to the terrain, the weather, or other factors. 

 

What we end up with, then, is the idea of geography as a misleading discipline. Okay, maybe the discipline itself is not misleading, but we have to be careful about making assumptions about a place based merely on its size or location. Some people may assume that some of the world's larger countries have strong and stable economies due to their size, but this is not always the case. Some of the most economically stable countries in the world are found in the relatively small nations of Europe. This map of Canada and the accompanying article, therefore, are a cautionary tale about taking things at face value and the importance of doing our own investigation and research. 

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Squatters on the Skyline

"Facing a mounting housing shortage, squatters have transformed an abandoned skyscraper in downtown Caracas into a makeshift home for more than 2,500 people."


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 25, 4:55 PM

The situation here in Caracas is very sad.  Sometimes we don't know how lucky we have it in America.  The picture that sticks with me from this video is the young man in a shirt and tie who is trying to provide for his family but could not get any credit.  He did not look like someone who is down on their luck.  He looked like a man who was optimistic and trying to inch forward.  I loved the picture he stood for.  It seems too often that we see people in America with the "Oh, poor me"-attitude!

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 3, 12:02 PM

From a young age, we learn that food and water, clothing, and shelter are the three necessities for life. The housing crisis in Venezuela depraves the people of at least one of those things. Making use of abandoned buildings, the people of Caracas have found a way to take care of the shelter. It's amazing how a skyscraper originally intended to house businesses that were incredibly affluent could end up becoming a slum of sorts after the business went under. 

 

A solution to the problem would be to officially turn the building into housing for the poor. Since it's been "unoccupied" since the 90's and the government has shown no intent to force the people out or tear it down, they might as well just use it as what the current inhabitants are using it for. The structure, for the most part, is already built. If they were able to add on to the core, then the building could be built at a lower cost than a new one. Although, the modifications the current residents may have made may have proved too costly to fix for the project to be feasible.

 

It's amazing these people have found a way to live together collectively and form their own little autonomous dwelling complete with a hierarchy and shops. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2:13 PM

The squatters have made their own community complete with services and mini marts.  This tells me there is not enough affordable housing if the people of Caracas are willing to live in dangerous conditions.  Caracas government needs to build affordable housing or create better paying jobs so the citizens can spend the money in the community.  Its a cycle that needs everyone's participation to work to build a sustaining economy.  

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Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse

Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"Argentina should be careful in considering the implications of the idea of moving the capital [from Buenos Aires] to Santiago del Estero. While a dramatic move might be appealing as a fresh start, it could end up aggravating the challenges of governing the country. Capitals, like flags, are symbols, but their choice has very real consequences."


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2:26 PM

It is an interesting piece of information that the country of Argentina would want to move its capital away from Buenos Aires to the small city of Santiago del Estero.  I thought it is an interesting political point brought up that by being far away from the city street mobs, the government would not have to be as accountable for its decisions.  However, the current capital city would certainly not be happy losing its title to a backwater town, and as the article suggest the leaders of the country should think long and hard before they decide on moving the capital.  People can have a strong feeling of pride living in the capital and if that is taken from them, they could lose confidence in the country.  Like the article states, "capitals, like flags, are symbols, but their choice has very real consequences."

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 13, 11:18 AM

This article discusses how there is a chance that the capital city in Argentina can change from Buenos Aires to a smaller city called Santiago Del Estero which is in the middle-north of the country. Many say this move can heal the divide between the two cities but the bigger picture it that it'll make it a lot worse. I wasn't aware that moving capital cities is actually a more common thing than we think. Buenos Aires is very over populated which is one of the reasons for wanting to move it. The major problem is an outcry from the people living in those cities and rebelling against this which could cause the government more problems. 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 3:50 PM

Very interesting article on capital city moves in this century. It also works for capital cities in the US that are rural in nature and away from the bright city lights. The plus side is that capital cities located within the most populated areas of a country or state will be under intense scrutiny to do the right thing and politicians will be held accountable for their actions. Doing business in the place where you live usually has this effect.

The negative aspect of moving to a rural area is that politicians can govern in relative anonymity away from the hustle and bustle of the big city. There is also a fear factor in South American countries that we in the US don't face; coups that will overthrow governments if they don't do the right thing. A protest in Buenos Aires for instance will carry much more weight than a protest in the rural setting of Santiago del Estero.

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 2014 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Helen Rowling's curator insight, September 28, 2014 6:30 PM

Use updates to filter through and be collated in your most frequented tools.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

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Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, July 21, 2014 11:21 PM

Making sense of poverty.

 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 4:54 PM

"Access"--North America Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report

CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Mapping global conflict month by month.

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, June 19, 2014 4:15 AM

Questa mappa interattiva vi permette, muovendovi sui singoli paesi, di leggere un aggiornamento sulle situazioni di conflitto in tutto il mondo. 


L' International Crisis Group è una organizzazione indipendente, non governativa e no-profit dedicata alla prevenzione e alla risoluzione dei conflitti. Hanno creato questa mappa interattiva per rendere più semplice e immediato l'aggiornamento sui principali conflitti nel mondo. 

Claudine Provencher's curator insight, June 19, 2014 5:40 AM

This looks like an excellent tool for students of international relations.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:26 PM

unit 4 --but really a great overall course resource!

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32 Mispronounced Places

32 Mispronounced Places | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"There’s nothing more irritating to a pedant’s ear and nothing more flabbergasting than realizing you’ve been pronouncing the name of so many places wrong, your entire life! Despite the judgment we exhibit toward people who err in enunciating, we all mispronounce a word from time to time, despite our best efforts. Well, now it’s time we can really stop mispronouncing the following places."


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 20, 11:37 AM

So interesting!  I knew Louisville, only because my husband of almost 18 years is from there and taught me very early in our relationship that it was "Luh-vull".  ha!  

Savannah Rains's curator insight, March 24, 3:14 AM

This fun article is telling people about common places that we butcher the names of. Some of the reasons that we say them wrong is because they are in different languages so we shouldn't be pronouncing everything perfectly. But the ones that we say everyday like Colorado, is because we ALL mispronounce it so it becomes the norm. This article really sheds some light on the way that languages can be misinterpreted or changed because of people.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2:16 AM

I love discovering I've mispronounced a word, particularly place names. Most of these are in the US but the few international examples are interesting (and the mispronounced variations are perplexing, perhaps we're blessed in Australia with journalists who can pronounce tricky foreign toponyms). I'm surprised Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia) and Uluru (NT, Australia) don't make the list.

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National Anthem of STRAYA (to the tune of Hey Ya) - YouTube

Outkast's 'Hey Ya' reworked into the unofficial national anthem of 'Straya' (a.k.a Australia). LYRICS: My country don't share no borders 'Cos of all the wate...

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dilaycock's curator insight, January 16, 5:20 AM

Engaging way to start a discussion of what it means to be Australian. I would be using something like Cleanr to show it as some of the comments are inappropriate.

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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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Where do the wealthiest 1% live?

Where do the wealthiest 1% live? | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
There was much talk in Davos this week of the wealthiest 1% in the world. Despite what you might think, they don't all live in hollowed-out volcanoes on private islands.
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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:57 AM

Several factors are posing a threat to life in the Sahel. The growing population is outpacing their food sources, and political instability and environmental change are adding to the tension. This region is home to not only the poorest nations but to some of the fastest growing populations in the world. While the situation in the region is certainly a problem, it shows that it will likely only get worse over time as the population continues to grow and food gets more scarce.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:46 AM

With the world population growing at a rapid rate, what will the food supply of some of these under developed countries look like when the expected population rate to hit 1 billion by 2050? In the Sahel, how are people going to use a desert like environment to produce crops that will feed its growing population? Its seems as if their problem is growing a rate faster than they can resolve.Will food plants be the new thing in their future?

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 3:40 PM

The Sahel region separates the North Africa Sahara and South African regions. The Sahel is ravaged by conflict and will soon face food shortages with it growing population. From 2000 to 2010 the population increased 30%. The rate of food production in the Sahel is below their population production and mixed in with global warming there will be problems. Global warming will lead to a reduced harvest with higher air pressure. Conflict is all over the Sahel in Sudan, Libya, Chad and Niger. Violence is likely to also grow as food supplies shrink. To go along with food shortages, this region hold some of the world’s fastest growing populations. Niger is the world’s poorest country and also has the highest birthrate, followed by Mali.

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Megacities Interactives

Megacities Interactives | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, will be home to 29 megacities. We explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of these 'cities on steroids', and take a look at the challenges and opportunities megacities present for the tens of millions living in Lagos, Mexico City and Dhaka."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 27, 2014 8:53 AM

Through this BBC interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents.   Also, this Smithsonian Magazine interactive (also on the rise of Megacities), argues that dealing with megacities is one of the traits of the Anthropocene. 


Download the BBC data as a CSV file to be able to import this into a customizable ArcGIS online map.  This will help you to create an analytical storymap (but I still enjoy a good narrative storymap).  


Tags: urban, megacitiesESRI, anthropocene, CSV.

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's curator insight, October 27, 2014 3:40 PM

and wuhan inside

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 11:48 AM

This article asks and answered the question of how and when we will reach a time and place where we live will be limited (as we weigh down the world)? -UNIT 1

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The Science of Earthquakes

The Science of Earthquakes | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
From fault types to the Ring of Fire to hydraulic fracking, the Earthquakes infographic by Weather Underground helps us understand the complexities of what shakes the ground.


Tags: disasters, geomorphology, physical, infographic.


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Mr. Twining's curator insight, November 25, 2014 3:58 PM

Infographic for teaching about the science behind earthquakes.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2:14 AM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 6, 10:05 PM

Excellent infographic for showing Earthquakes :)

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Max Minard's curator insight, March 22, 9:04 PM

This map shows the average age for every country based on its own individual population. It even provides the oldest and youngest countries with Niger being the youngest country on average and Germany and Japan tied for the oldest country on average. certain patterns can be seen on the map such as the green areas (teens as median age) being mainly centered is almost all of Africa. The other areas are in the twenties. Based on this information, one can safely assume that the average global ages correlates with the relative development of each country and it s success in domestic health care. Having this allows for their population to have a larger life expectancy and therefore a higher average age based on its overall population. 

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 12:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 

 

II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 7:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

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Libya in agreement with Egypt, Chad and Sudan on sharing underground water

Libya in agreement with Egypt, Chad and Sudan on sharing underground water | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Tripoli, 20 September 2013: Libya, Egypt, Chad and Sudan have signed a UN-backed agreement  on the shared use of a massive underground aquifer system straddling the four countries known as the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System.

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, October 15, 2013 5:33 AM

CD - The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa.

Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
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Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes

Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"For 75 years, Finland's expectant mothers have been given a box by the state. It's like a starter kit of clothes, sheets and toys that can even be used as a bed. And some say it helped Finland achieve one of the world's lowest infant mortality rates."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 30, 2014 3:58 PM

This is a fascinating article that can be a great case study to share with students to allow them to analyze the factors that can improve infant mortality rates.  In Finland the government provided oversight to improve infant mortality rates, pre-natal care and promote good parenting in a way that has had tangible results.  


Tags: Finland, medical, population,demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

Gillian Campbell's curator insight, July 31, 2014 6:04 AM

It's certainly an interesting one.....

Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
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Google Maps Smarty Pins

Google Maps Smarty Pins | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Smarty Pins is a Google Maps based geography and trivia game.

Via Seth Dixon
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flea palmer's curator insight, July 7, 2014 10:33 AM

This is really good fun - I got gold (14/15) not sure how many miles though!

Tom Franta's curator insight, July 10, 2014 9:54 AM

An interesting way to get anyone interacting with Google Maps...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:42 PM

APHG-MAPS

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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:48 AM

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:00 PM

APHG-U1