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The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
When the giant fault line along the Pacific Northwest ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster ever.

 

The Cascadia subduction zone remained hidden from us for so long because we could not see deep enough into the past. It poses a danger to us today because we have not thought deeply enough about the future. The Cascadia situation, a calamity in its own right, is also a parable for this age of ecological reckoning, and the questions it raises are ones that we all now face. How should a society respond to a looming crisis of uncertain timing but of catastrophic proportions? How can it begin to right itself when its entire infrastructure and culture developed in a way that leaves it profoundly vulnerable to natural disaster?


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Diane Johnson's curator insight, July 30, 10:33 PM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

aitouaddaC's curator insight, August 3, 8:42 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2:20 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Customizable Classroom Maps

Customizable Classroom Maps | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"The idea for creating dynamic online teaching maps came up after one of our teacher friends expressed her frustration over how difficult it was to find just the right learning map for particular topic."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 25, 10:17 AM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site lets you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  If you want online map quizzes for a regional geography course, these are my favorites.  Here is another good site for basic outline maps.       


Tags: K12, map, map archives

gelatinzoom's comment, June 26, 6:58 AM
Good
Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 3:55 PM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site lets you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  If you want online map quizzes for a regional geography course, these are my favorites.  Here is another good site for basic outline maps.       


Tags: K12, map, map archives. 

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Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes

Why Finnish babies sleep in boxes | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"For 75 years, Finland's expectant mothers have been given a box by the state. It's like a starter kit of clothes, sheets and toys that can even be used as a bed. And some say it helped Finland achieve one of the world's lowest infant mortality rates."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 30, 2014 3:58 PM

This is a fascinating article that can be a great case study to share with students to allow them to analyze the factors that can improve infant mortality rates.  In Finland the government provided oversight to improve infant mortality rates, pre-natal care and promote good parenting in a way that has had tangible results.  


Tags: Finland, medical, population,demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

Gillian Campbell's curator insight, July 31, 2014 6:04 AM

It's certainly an interesting one.....

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CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report

CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Mapping global conflict month by month.

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, June 19, 2014 4:15 AM

Questa mappa interattiva vi permette, muovendovi sui singoli paesi, di leggere un aggiornamento sulle situazioni di conflitto in tutto il mondo. 


L' International Crisis Group è una organizzazione indipendente, non governativa e no-profit dedicata alla prevenzione e alla risoluzione dei conflitti. Hanno creato questa mappa interattiva per rendere più semplice e immediato l'aggiornamento sui principali conflitti nel mondo. 

Claudine Provencher's curator insight, June 19, 2014 5:40 AM

This looks like an excellent tool for students of international relations.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:26 PM

unit 4 --but really a great overall course resource!

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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 

 

This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events. 

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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.


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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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Megacities Interactives

Megacities Interactives | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, will be home to 29 megacities. We explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of these 'cities on steroids', and take a look at the challenges and opportunities megacities present for the tens of millions living in Lagos, Mexico City and Dhaka."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 27, 2014 8:53 AM

Through this BBC interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents.   Also, this Smithsonian Magazine interactive (also on the rise of Megacities), argues that dealing with megacities is one of the traits of the Anthropocene. 


Download the BBC data as a CSV file to be able to import this into a customizable ArcGIS online map.  This will help you to create an analytical storymap (but I still enjoy a good narrative storymap).  


Tags: urban, megacitiesESRI, anthropocene, CSV.

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's curator insight, October 27, 2014 3:40 PM

and wuhan inside

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 11:48 AM

This article asks and answered the question of how and when we will reach a time and place where we live will be limited (as we weigh down the world)? -UNIT 1

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Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, July 21, 2014 11:21 PM

Making sense of poverty.

 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 4:54 PM

"Access"--North America Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly.