Geography Ed
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Geography Education
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Don’t make bicyclists more visible. Make drivers stop hitting them.

Don’t make bicyclists more visible. Make drivers stop hitting them. | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Mandatory helmet laws and glow-in-the-dark spray paint just show who really owns the roads.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 7, 2016 12:23 PM

This op-ed is good discussion fodder to discuss the urban planning preferences embedded within our transportation choices. 

 

Tagsop-ed, urban, transportation, planning.

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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy

 

Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.


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François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 2015 4:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 2015 9:02 AM

Une courte vidéo de la revue The Economist

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

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What is the oldest city in the world?

What is the oldest city in the world? | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
 Mark Twain declared that the Indian city of Varanasi was older than history, tradition and legend. He was, of course, wrong. So which exactly is the world’s most ancient continuously inhabited city?

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Cass Allan's curator insight, March 1, 2015 2:17 AM

differences of opinion about how to classify city age

 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 2015 7:58 PM

Since the beginning of civilization, rivers have been communities' main job source. Even before B.C., the only one way to survive was to construct houses close to the nearest body of water. In the case of Crocodile City near the Nile river in Africa,the city was built close to the river due to the fertile soil and water supplied by the Nile. This enabled ancient civilizations to survive. Unfortunately, due to religious conflict between communities, some of these original civilizations were forced to relocate. Another reason for relocation is due to the movement of the bodies of water. As the paths of the rivers change, communities are forced to abandon their homes and start new civilizations so to remain close to the waters. All these communities around the river Nile relied on agriculture for its wealth and power. All these cities are examples of civilizations that have inhabited areas near rivers for centuries, even before B.C. Given their habitat, rivers will provide the necessar resources and tools for current and future generations to be able to survive.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 2:55 PM

Although the question is misleading, it should say what is the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world, I enjoyed the article as once again I learned quite a bit about ancient history. Seems Aleppo, Syria is the apparent winner. They have dated the city to 6000 BC and nomads were there 5000 years before that. Shows the importance of trade as most of the contenders were on a trade route near a body of water. In fact, the article says that Aleppo was very much involved in trade until the opening of the Suez canal. Let's hope that with all the turmoil in Syria that Aleppo continues to thrive for centuries to come. Constantinople and Damascus were serious contenders but could not show continuous habitation. Aleppo according to the article, was a strong contender for commerce alongside Cairo, Egypt. Another contender, Jericho, dates back to 9000 BC but again was not continually inhabited and thus cannot lay claim to the world's oldest city.

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Megacities Interactives

Megacities Interactives | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, will be home to 29 megacities. We explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of these 'cities on steroids', and take a look at the challenges and opportunities megacities present for the tens of millions living in Lagos, Mexico City and Dhaka."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 27, 2014 8:53 AM

Through this BBC interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents.   Also, this Smithsonian Magazine interactive (also on the rise of Megacities), argues that dealing with megacities is one of the traits of the Anthropocene. 


Download the BBC data as a CSV file to be able to import this into a customizable ArcGIS online map.  This will help you to create an analytical storymap (but I still enjoy a good narrative storymap).  


Tags: urban, megacitiesESRI, anthropocene, CSV.

Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, October 27, 2014 3:40 PM

and wuhan inside

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 11:48 AM

This article asks and answered the question of how and when we will reach a time and place where we live will be limited (as we weigh down the world)? -UNIT 1

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

Casey Lysdale's curator insight, November 28, 2016 12:43 PM
Could subsistence in megacities becoming a bigger threat than sea level rise? The population rise caused an increase in groundwater extraction practices which made the ground sink over six feet in Indonesia's largest city. The solution is to stop pumping groundwater and seek alternative forms of obtaining drinking water. Effects of land subsistence combined with rising sea levels can leave many coastal cities into project Atlantis. 
 
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Mapping the Sexism of Street Names in Major Cities

Mapping the Sexism of Street Names in Major Cities | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
In a study of seven world metros, only a little more than a quarter of the streets were named for women.

 

Tags: gender, mapping, urban, toponyms.


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Detroit's Beautiful, Horrible Decline

Detroit's Beautiful, Horrible Decline | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

Two French photographers immortalize the remains of the motor city on film.  Pictured above is the Packard Plant; luxury-auto maker Packard produced its last car here in 1956.  To see more work by Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre, visit their website.

 

Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit, images, art, landscape. 


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London's second languages mapped by tube stop

London's second languages mapped by tube stop | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"Walk along the streets of London and it’s not uncommon to hear a variety of langauges jostling for space in your eardrums. Step inside a tube carriage on the underground and the story is no different.

Oliver O’Brien, researcher in geovisualisation and web mapping at University College London’s department of geography, has created a map showing what the most common second language (after English) is at certain tube stops across the capital.

Using a map of tube journeys and busy stations that he had previously created, O’Brien used 2011 Census data to add the second most commonly spoken language that people who live nearby speak."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2015 9:12 AM

This map is an excellent way to introduce the concept of ethnic neighborhoods and show how they spatially form and what ties them together.  This other article shows how the spatial arrangement of London's population has changed from 1939 to today. 


Tags: London, urbantransportation, ethnicitylanguage, culture.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 12, 2015 11:45 PM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 6, 2015 9:29 PM

This made me think of how this could be done in New York City.  I imagine results would be similar.  You could map out the languages for sure.  

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Squatters on the Skyline

"Facing a mounting housing shortage, squatters have transformed an abandoned skyscraper in downtown Caracas into a makeshift home for more than 2,500 people."


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2015 2:13 PM

The squatters have made their own community complete with services and mini marts.  This tells me there is not enough affordable housing if the people of Caracas are willing to live in dangerous conditions.  Caracas government needs to build affordable housing or create better paying jobs so the citizens can spend the money in the community.  Its a cycle that needs everyone's participation to work to build a sustaining economy.  

Gene Gagne's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:42 PM

I found this article interesting

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 10:57 AM

we have talked about this in class. These people have learned to adapt and find ways to use electricity, running water. We have seen videos of other cities in countries with electrical cables and sewage water out in the open and people find ways to tap into it. The building reminds me of the abandon mills in R.I. where homeless people frequent to beat the harsh elements and sleep at night. They build small fires and use different areas for bathroom visits. The difference is our brick unoccupied mills find a way to catch fire and the city levels them to the ground. This is definitely unsafe but goes to show when you have no place to live its amazing how people find ways to survive and kind of build their own community. What I found disturbing is the people outside the neighborhood angry because the squatters took over the building. All of a sudden they complained about the safety of the squatters when in all reality they are safer because they are acting as a self community and know they need each other to survive. If the government or city officials or citizens of the neighborhood are that concerned then they can find a way to fix up the building.

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 2014 9:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 2014 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History