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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

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sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:48 AM

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:00 PM

APHG-U1

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Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada

Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"Canada: land-wise, it's one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, it's anything but.The map comes from the Government of Canada's 'Plant Hardiness Site,' which contains images showing 'Extreme Minimum Temperature Zones' throughout the Great White North."

 

Tags: Canada, map, North America, weather and climate.


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 10:50 AM

This map and commentary is meant to put Canada's population-to-land ratio in perspective and a reason why the low ratio has developed.  Canada, although among the biggest landmasses out of any country in the world, is not heavily populated due, in large part, to its physical characteristics.  As the map shows, temperatures in most locations of the country are not conducive to plant-life.  Whereas agriculture is not the end-all be-all for human-life, the capability of growing crops definitely plays a factor in where populations were and are willing to cluster. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 6:25 PM

 While Canada is very cold during the winter, to say that people shouldn't live there because plants don't might be a little excessive.  These temperatures are clearly only in the winter time and are extreme lows.  Canada in the summertime is quite beautiful, has plenty of vegetation and is probably very pleasant and comfortable to live.  Just like people who live in very hot, uncomfortable areas, i'm sure the inhabitants of Canada adapt to the colder season and take great pride in where they live.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 1:18 PM

It's a little strange to think that one of the world's largest countries in terms of area does not boast a very large population. Then again, when we think of Russia (the largest country by area in the world), many of its regions are uninhabited as well because of extreme climatic conditions. Countries like India, China, and Brazil, however, have enormous populations because they are located in more temperate zones, and so almost every area of the country is habitable.  There are places in every country, however, that are uninhabitable due to the terrain, the weather, or other factors. 

 

What we end up with, then, is the idea of geography as a misleading discipline. Okay, maybe the discipline itself is not misleading, but we have to be careful about making assumptions about a place based merely on its size or location. Some people may assume that some of the world's larger countries have strong and stable economies due to their size, but this is not always the case. Some of the most economically stable countries in the world are found in the relatively small nations of Europe. This map of Canada and the accompanying article, therefore, are a cautionary tale about taking things at face value and the importance of doing our own investigation and research. 

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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 

 

This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events.