Geography Ed
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Geography Education
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The area of this map coloured red has the same population as the area coloured blue

The area of this map coloured red has the same population as the area coloured blue | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Well, this is kind of crazy. Only 5 per cent of the world's population lives in the regions of this map shaded blue. Another 5 per cent lives in the area shaded red. Yoinks.

 

Tags: population, density, South Asia.


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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, January 6, 6:34 AM

Parece realmente una broma, pero la zona coloreada de rojo alberga a 350 millones de personas sobre una superficie que arroja una densidad poblacional de 1,062 habitantes por Km2. Si esto se compara con el país más densamente poblado de Europa, que es Holanda, con una densidad de 409 habitantes/Km2 o incluso con el departamento de Lima (269.1 habitantes /Km2) vemos que hay una gran diferencia. Pero el Perú también tiene propio su punto rojo en términos de densidad poblacional (no en términos de población absoluta). ¿Saben que lugar es este? Pues la provincia Constitucional del Callao que tiene una densidad poblacional de 7,159.83 habitantes/Km2 (2015).

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World Religion Map

World Religion Map | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
The incredibly detailed map of the world's religions shows what the biggest religion is by census area in each country, along with its level of support.

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Emma Lewis's curator insight, April 2, 11:40 AM

there are many religions in the world, but there are only a few very widespread religions. There are many religions only existing in 1 or two places and a few that exist all around the world. EL

 

Tags: culture, religion.

Makenzie Geiger's curator insight, April 4, 10:11 AM

Mapping religion can be incredibly problematic, but this map (hi-res here) uses the best data available for each country.  Examine some of the regional maps (Asia, Europe, North America, Oceania); what patterns are interesting/surprising to you? 

Since I am a Christian of course I would want my religion to be mostly populated however I know that everyone has different beliefs. To me this map is very interesting because it not only gives a visual representation of different religions around the world but also gives facts about them. 

Tags: culture, religion.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, April 7, 10:17 AM
I believe that this is very helpful among people wondering about and or learning about the distribution of religion throughout the world. 
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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.


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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:42 PM

These contemporary maps help undetrstand the changing global population distribution.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:53 PM

The two maps that received my attention the most was 'No Work for the Young' and "Big City Drain.' It bothers me to read that the young population of European citizens is out of work, even the cities that do well. Stockholm, a well off country has a you unemployment rate of 30 percent, and Sheffield is 35 percent, that is huge! As for Big City Drain, although Europe's cities are growing, it is because of immigrants from other countries and migrants from that country moving to another part, just to find better work. Having immigrants does not help a particular countries population. Also the fact that since big cities are more expensive, people will leave the big cities such as London and Paris to find cheaper means of living. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:01 AM

Population shifts are an important part of determining migrating trends of a population. Are they going to more urban areas? Are they going to suburban areas?  These maps can help understand the questions regarding where the higher population trends are and what countries are seeing a drop in their population to people moving to new places and creating new lives.

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Customizable Classroom Maps

Customizable Classroom Maps | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"The idea for creating dynamic online teaching maps came up after one of our teacher friends expressed her frustration over how difficult it was to find just the right learning map for particular topic."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 25, 2015 10:17 AM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site lets you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  If you want online map quizzes for a regional geography course, these are my favorites.  Here is another good site for basic outline maps.       


Tags: K12, map, map archives

gelatinzoom's comment, June 26, 2015 6:58 AM
Good
Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:55 PM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site lets you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  If you want online map quizzes for a regional geography course, these are my favorites.  Here is another good site for basic outline maps.       


Tags: K12, map, map archives. 

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Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada

Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"Canada: land-wise, it's one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, it's anything but.The map comes from the Government of Canada's 'Plant Hardiness Site,' which contains images showing 'Extreme Minimum Temperature Zones' throughout the Great White North."

 

Tags: Canada, map, North America, weather and climate.


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Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:18 PM

It's a little strange to think that one of the world's largest countries in terms of area does not boast a very large population. Then again, when we think of Russia (the largest country by area in the world), many of its regions are uninhabited as well because of extreme climatic conditions. Countries like India, China, and Brazil, however, have enormous populations because they are located in more temperate zones, and so almost every area of the country is habitable.  There are places in every country, however, that are uninhabitable due to the terrain, the weather, or other factors. 

 

What we end up with, then, is the idea of geography as a misleading discipline. Okay, maybe the discipline itself is not misleading, but we have to be careful about making assumptions about a place based merely on its size or location. Some people may assume that some of the world's larger countries have strong and stable economies due to their size, but this is not always the case. Some of the most economically stable countries in the world are found in the relatively small nations of Europe. This map of Canada and the accompanying article, therefore, are a cautionary tale about taking things at face value and the importance of doing our own investigation and research. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 8:51 AM

Canada is large relatively uninhabitable country. Most of the nation is basically barren frozen wilderness. This article shows the key point that climate plays in the question of where humans decided to live. Warm and temperate climates traditionally attract the most people. Know one wants to live with polar bears. While their are many geographic factors to were people live, climate may be the most important.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 21, 2015 11:46 PM

It really isn't much of a shock that one of the world's biggest countries, Canada, does not have a large population. The obvious reason is because the temperatures reach extremely low. Not a lot of people live in Northern Quebec, Yukon, or Nunavut. Its interesting to think that a country so big has mostly all its population in cities along the border line of Canada and the U.S. One of the thoughts that comes to mind is how, Canada has all this 'empty' territory, with little to no activity happening in certain areas, is this land really Canada's to claim? We hear people always talking about the touristic areas like Niagara Falls or Toronto, but what makes places like Nuvavut, Canada? Its almost like if half of Canada is actually Canada. 

Overall, it is completely understandable that no one will want to live in extreme cold temperatures but it would be interesting to learn more about these Canadian States. 

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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 2015 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 

 

This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events. 

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100 outstanding interactive maps of 2015

100 outstanding interactive maps of 2015 | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

Tags: K12, map, map archives.
It's time to present the most interesting interactive maps that came to our attention in 2015


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 12:58 PM

There is bound to be something that you will find useful/insightful in this year-end list part I and part II).

 

Tags: map, map archives.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, January 23, 4:50 PM

Such a great collection of interactive and beautiful maps, hours of entertainment for the North American APHUG nerdus domesticus.

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World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above

World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Percentage of a country's population that can read and write. Country's define literacy age between 7 and 20 years old. The standard age for literacy most countries is 15 years of age.

 

Tags: education, K12, development, map, worldwide.


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Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 2015 4:29 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:53 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:21 AM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:42 PM

These contemporary maps help undetrstand the changing global population distribution.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:53 PM

The two maps that received my attention the most was 'No Work for the Young' and "Big City Drain.' It bothers me to read that the young population of European citizens is out of work, even the cities that do well. Stockholm, a well off country has a you unemployment rate of 30 percent, and Sheffield is 35 percent, that is huge! As for Big City Drain, although Europe's cities are growing, it is because of immigrants from other countries and migrants from that country moving to another part, just to find better work. Having immigrants does not help a particular countries population. Also the fact that since big cities are more expensive, people will leave the big cities such as London and Paris to find cheaper means of living. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:01 AM

Population shifts are an important part of determining migrating trends of a population. Are they going to more urban areas? Are they going to suburban areas?  These maps can help understand the questions regarding where the higher population trends are and what countries are seeing a drop in their population to people moving to new places and creating new lives.

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Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled

Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Tips from a geographer who's seen it all.

 

Tags:  mapping, cartography, 201, perspective, map.


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lackingingot's comment, June 30, 2015 2:58 AM
Excellent...!!
Kevin Barker's curator insight, June 30, 2015 10:35 AM

Excellent article with examples for exploring the ways in which maps can fail or mislead us.  This is particularly important considering how easily maps can be created by anyone through the availability of digital resources.

Angus Henderson's curator insight, July 2, 2015 2:04 AM

A mapping 'take-down' of great detail, with lots of of interesting linked examples

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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

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sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:48 AM

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:00 PM

APHG-U1