Geography Ed
125 views | +0 today
Follow
Geography Ed
Geography Education
Curated by Pch1988
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Visualizing the Global Economy

Visualizing the Global Economy | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
The graphic above (Voronoi diagram) represents the relative size of each country’s economy in terms of nominal GDP: the larger the area, the larger the size of the economy. The areas are further divided into three sectors: services, industrial, and agricultural. The US economy is mostly composed of companies engaged in providing services (79.7% compared to the global average of 63.6%), while agriculture and industry make up smaller-than-average of portions of the economy (1.12% and 19.1% compared to averages of 5.9% and 30.5%).

 

Tags: globalization, industry, economic, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 4, 2016 10:18 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 8, 2016 11:39 PM
Quem e como está dentro?! 
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 22, 11:10 AM
unit 6
Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer.

Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer. | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

"Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer. I really wish you would have done so before your big announcement saying you would, as of 2016, be sourcing all of your turkey and chicken as being raised without antibiotics."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, November 9, 2015 10:45 AM

I understand the concern over eating meat that has residual antibiotics, but I also understand that disease in animals is as cruel as in humans.  Do we let the animals die from a treatable disease?  Think of the chicken farmers in Iowa who had to destroy their entire flock because of bird flu. What if an antibiotic would have kept the birds healthy?  There is a waiting period after treating an animal before it is safe to harvest for meat, responsible producers know this and abide by best practices.  It is frustrating when a group criticized producers for not caring for their livestock and in the next breath complain about the drugs used to treat them.  

Meat does not come from a machine. There a hundreds of variables that go into producing the safest most reliable food supply on the planet. Three words for those who are still in doubt: Grow Your Own. 

Vicki Bedingfield's curator insight, November 15, 2015 4:58 PM

Food production

Cade Johns's curator insight, January 7, 2016 6:47 PM

Why are they not using antibiotics?Is it to be healthier or for flavor.Either one should attract different crowds.The healthier alternative brings healthier people in there.C.J.

Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Changes in Three Gorges Dam

NASA's animation of China's Three Gorges Dam construction over the years.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2015 6:32 PM

Inland water - environmental change 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 5:40 PM

The impact of the Three Gorges Dam on the residents upstream is amazing. I cannot imagine anything like this happening in the US, mostly because of the impact on the people both upstream and downstream. Ecological damage from this dam may not phase the Chinese government, but I think any North American or European government would shudder at the thought of the backlash among their citizens this would create.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:27 PM

Three Gorges damn in China is the largest dam ever constructed. This was created to save on power by creating hydroelectric power for the people of the land. One of the issues with this was the the flooding of the land up streams displacing millions of people. It created a larger up stream area and very small down stream. A lot of the people that lived up stream had to be relocated further inland and faced changing climatif weather. The banks of the river are carved out between what seems like mountainous regions so as you move more uphill the weather and temperature will be a whole new category of life (Depending on how far you relocated).

Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Detroit's Beautiful, Horrible Decline

Detroit's Beautiful, Horrible Decline | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

Two French photographers immortalize the remains of the motor city on film.  Pictured above is the Packard Plant; luxury-auto maker Packard produced its last car here in 1956.  To see more work by Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre, visit their website.

 

Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit, images, art, landscape. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 2014 7:07 AM

add your insight...

Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:00 PM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:21 AM

The Ganges River is the most populated region in all of India. The river is sacred and is very holy to the people of India. The river is a religious river in which the people residing in the area use it as a symbolization or purification, life, bathing and drinking. The bigger issue for 'purification' is the fact that the river is very polluted and unsanitary. The pollution not only threatens the people because it could be used for drinking but it also affects the thousands of species, for example fish, that are in the river. The fish could be a source of food for the very overpopulated area but instead the very own people of India are damaging the river. One would think that a river so sacred would be protected and cleaned but it fails to meet these standards. Overall, regardless of the pollution, India still uses it for its religious beliefs and still declare it a holy river. 

Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 2016 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Let's review exactly what population has to do with economic growth

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:00 PM

I found this article absolutely fascinating. In the 2016 presidential race, Democratic candidate (and, arguably, frontrunner) Bernie Sanders has pledged to raise corporate taxes in order to provide for social programs, better education, and universal healthcare for all its citizens. Critics have pointed to the failure of such a plan when he attempted to implement it in his home state of Vermont, where the working class was simply not large enough to support the retirement system Sanders attempted to put in place. Defenders of Bernie have argued that what's true of Vermont's demographic- the second least populated state in the country- will not hold true for the nation as a whole, and this article suggests that these defenders have a point. While economic growth may not be as fast for younger American workers, by 2040 these welfare programs will still be running under any additional strain. The same cannot be said for the Chinese, where the disproportionate number of males being born- 119 for every 100 female children- means that a huge population gap will emerge between younger and older Chinese. Without being able to father a new generation, this group of mostly-male Chinese will age and be an enormous burden on the Chinese economy, to an extent that's almost unfathomable here in the US. China has since revered its One Child Policy that put itself in its current predicament, but it may well be a case of too little, too late.

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:57 AM

Unit 2

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:03 AM

añada su visión ...

Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy

 

Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 2015 4:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 2015 9:02 AM

Une courte vidéo de la revue The Economist

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

Rescooped by Pch1988 from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 2015 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 2015 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:24 PM

An important aspect of global trade links and connections.