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Iceland's Glacial Melt and Geothermal Activity

Iceland's Glacial Melt and Geothermal Activity | Geography Ed | Scoop.it

Glacial melting and flooding occurs every year by the Skafta River in Iceland. As the water travels down towards the North Atlantic Ocean, incredible patterns are created on the hillsides. Rising lava, steam vents, or newly opened hot springs can all cause this rapid ice melt, leading to a sizable release of water that picks up sediment as it flows down from the glaciers.

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.


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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:42 PM

These contemporary maps help undetrstand the changing global population distribution.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:53 PM

The two maps that received my attention the most was 'No Work for the Young' and "Big City Drain.' It bothers me to read that the young population of European citizens is out of work, even the cities that do well. Stockholm, a well off country has a you unemployment rate of 30 percent, and Sheffield is 35 percent, that is huge! As for Big City Drain, although Europe's cities are growing, it is because of immigrants from other countries and migrants from that country moving to another part, just to find better work. Having immigrants does not help a particular countries population. Also the fact that since big cities are more expensive, people will leave the big cities such as London and Paris to find cheaper means of living. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:01 AM

Population shifts are an important part of determining migrating trends of a population. Are they going to more urban areas? Are they going to suburban areas?  These maps can help understand the questions regarding where the higher population trends are and what countries are seeing a drop in their population to people moving to new places and creating new lives.

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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.

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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:42 PM

These contemporary maps help undetrstand the changing global population distribution.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:53 PM

The two maps that received my attention the most was 'No Work for the Young' and "Big City Drain.' It bothers me to read that the young population of European citizens is out of work, even the cities that do well. Stockholm, a well off country has a you unemployment rate of 30 percent, and Sheffield is 35 percent, that is huge! As for Big City Drain, although Europe's cities are growing, it is because of immigrants from other countries and migrants from that country moving to another part, just to find better work. Having immigrants does not help a particular countries population. Also the fact that since big cities are more expensive, people will leave the big cities such as London and Paris to find cheaper means of living. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:01 AM

Population shifts are an important part of determining migrating trends of a population. Are they going to more urban areas? Are they going to suburban areas?  These maps can help understand the questions regarding where the higher population trends are and what countries are seeing a drop in their population to people moving to new places and creating new lives.

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Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets

Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets | Geography Ed | Scoop.it
New figures show the lowest total number of births since the formation of the modern Italian state

 

Fewer babies were born in Italy in 2014 than in any other year since the modern Italian state was formed in 1861, new data show, highlighting the demographic challenge faced by the country’s chronically sluggish economy.  National statistics office ISTAT said on Thursday the number of live births last year was 509,000, or 5,000 fewer than in 2013, rounding off half a century of decline.  The number of babies born to both natives and foreigners living in Italy dropped as immigration, which used to support the overall birth rate, tumbled to its lowest level for five years.

 

Tag: Italy, Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


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Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:00 PM

Unit II: Population and Migration

 

As Italy becomes a highly developed country, it begins to experience a large population decline. Fertility rates are negative and continue to decline, and mortality rates are dropping as well. People are not having large families, and all of these factors contribute to the rapidly declining population of Italy. The prime minister of Italy hopes to simulate an economic and cultural recharge in hopes that this will help encourage people to make more babies so that the population does not continue to decline at this rate.

 

This relates to the demographic transition model, as Italy is in the last stage of it. Once countries are developed, fertility rates begin to slow as mortality rates continue to decline, causing a decline in the total overall population. This is clearly exemplified through this story about Italy. 

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:01 PM

The low birth rate in Italy is causing the country to think that its dying because there aren't enough new-born to replace the ones that passed away. As the article state, it mainly in the south where the economy is very poor and the average family is not making as much money as they should to support more children. This might lead people to migrate to other places  to find opportunities for their future generations. If Italy could find a way distribute wealth evenly across the countries they might be able to find a better result in birth rate. This is easier said than done however. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 3:44 PM

its fascinating that there may no longer be such a term as Italian outside of history books in fifty years. the low birth rate in European countries is a major concern, especially as the economies in those same countries start to suffer.