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Regional Geogaphy
Curated by Matt Mallinson
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Does democracy stifle economic growth?

TED Talks Economist Yasheng Huang compares China to India, and asks how China's authoritarian rule contributed to its astonishing economic growth -- leading to a big question: Is democracy actually holding India back?

 

This compelling TedTalk explores the links between economic development and governmental style, oversight and influence.  While the speaker mainly discusses politics and economics in the context of China and India, Pakistan, Russia, North and South Korea are all mentioned.      


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 21, 2012 11:11 AM
Democracy can stifle economic growth. War will definitely stifle economic growth. North Korea doesn't look like they're going to stop fighting South Korea, if only they would combine their lands, they would probably be a much better nation as one.
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:17 PM

For Americans the idea that democracy can be anything but sunshine and rainbows is a hard pill to swallow. There is evidence that supports the contrary. Although democracy has the moral high ground, authoritative governments can grow at a faster rate because it does not have to address resistance where democracy fosters debate and dissent. In India, millions of people will not agree on everything and therefore progress can be slow going. 

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Industrial geography and internal markets

China's reputation as a low-cost manufacturer hasn't translated into low-cost prices. Many goods, particularly luxury items, have higher price tags in China than abroad. One economist blames the transportation system and corruption.

 

Industrial geography in today's climate shows that China has clear economic advantages over most of the world to manufacture good cheaply.  Why would this not necessarily translate to cheap consumer goods for China's domestic market?  High taxes, steep internal shipping costs and a market flooded with knock-offs all contribute to this paradox. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:08 AM
To be honest I always thought items were made cheap in China due to all the items I see with the "Made in China" tag. This was interesting to me and definitely gave me knowledge on the topic.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:29 PM

Almost everyone knows that products are cheaper to produce in China which is why so many of our products are manufactured there today. BUt one may think that would mean it was cheap for Chinese consumers to purshase as well right? Surprisingly no, it actually costs more for them. This is because the country has a high transportation fee and the government is corrupt, CHina also has a very high tax on their products. But because of the major price differences much of the Chinese population purchases their products while traveling overseas.   

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:37 PM

Although the products we buy from China are cheap for us, it is not necessarily cheap for the ones making it. The tax on goods in China is very expensive. It is also because the government is plagued with corruption, and that is where the taxes come in. It is suprising that many cannot afford the goods they make.

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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Classwork Portfolio | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:04 PM

Very simple and easy to interpret graph on the One child policy in China. When thinking about the "has it been successful" section I was troubled. Yes the government came close to its goal of 1.2 Billion but do so they prevented 400 million births. So its successful because they almost hit the mark but at what costs? Natal policies can leave countries without enough people to repopulate the workforce, we have to keep this in mind. Controlling population is a dangerous project.. 

Daniel Eggen's curator insight, February 9, 2015 8:13 PM

Great infographic on the One Child Policy. Based on the birth rates in other countries in the East Asia region, how much demographic change may there have been in China without the implementation of this policy? 

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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | Classwork Portfolio | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:19 PM

Shanghai China, a global transportatio hub has grown tremendously into a megaity within 20 years. This is due to the high imports and the location on the river. This created a high import rate and a low wage rate. Because of this they were able to build this city into a megacity.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:22 PM
Wow! All I can say is Wow! Shanghai overall in every way is highly indistinguishable from what it was in 1990. On the far side it is minimally developed and on the close side it has what looks to be a fairly modern city for the 90s. Take a jump twenty years and it is as if it was built the way it looks currently Even the side closest that was developed in the 90s, looks like it was scrapped and rebuilt to be even more modern, a mega city. Because of its strategic location and has a river for transportation, it is a transportation hub, which is why it has the money to do what it does.
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:46 AM

These two images are perhaps a goo example of how globalization has developed over Shanghai in just 20 years. The images show how once greener and more spacious the region looked before in 1990, and the other image shows how technology has developed and become an important priority to the people. There are huge tall buildings located in the area and the other natural source seen is the body of water surrounding some of the tallest buildings in the area. There is no longer any trees which is also a sign of how un-important or how simple to was for the Shanghai to knock them down to simply make more buildings. The concept shows how business has developed in the region but also shows the potentially jobs located here as well. Overall, this part of Shanghai is very economically stable but it is also important to see outside of the heart of the buildings.