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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Geography | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, November 8, 2013 8:06 PM

Remember we talked about megacities last week?

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:12 AM

The mega city revlution has started and accroing to stastics its only to get more popular. The creattion of these mega cities has trasformed where people want to live, while also helping to bring nations stability though creation on these mega cities. It was said that with in 30 years more than 60% of the population will live in cities. Theses megacities are desirable, they help to stablize a country and have almost doubbled in number since the 1990's. It will be intereesting to see how the effects of megacites play out on the eniorment and ecnomny in the futre though.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

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In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | Geography | Scoop.it

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Coming from America were woman have had equal rights for nearly a century its hard to grasp the concept of it just starting in Saudi. Phys Ed is a crucial part of the development of a adolescent and it is nessacary for both genders. being more lenient on woman sports can only help the nation. It will bring it possitive attention, help the flow of money, and be a platform for womens rights in the times to come.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 6:53 PM

The article displays the constant battle the women of Saudi Arabia face on a daily basis. However, this is a small sign of women in this area slowly getting more rights. This is an important right granted to women. Being allowed to participate in sporting activities or other types of physical exercise is very important in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. 

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 11:49 AM

This is a push in the struggle for women's rights in Saudi Arabian. For the first time girls will be allowed to play sports in private schools. The ultraconservative kingdom still requires that the girls were descent and  decent dress and and Saudi women teachers are going to have priority in supervising the activities.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:23 PM

Female rights in countries like Saudi Arabia are nothing like in the U.S. Much like in other Middle Eastern countries, Saudi Arabia allows little to no extra curricular activities for girls and women. Allowing them to play some specific sports is a huge deal!

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The New Places Where America's Tech Future Is Taking Shape

The New Places Where America's Tech Future Is Taking Shape | Geography | Scoop.it

"Technology is reshaping our economic geography, but there’s disagreement as to how. Much of the media and pundits like Richard Florida assert that the tech revolution is bound to be centralized in the dense, often 'hip' places where 'smart' people cluster.

 

From 2001 to 2012, STEM employment actually was essentially flat in the San Francisco and Boston regions and  declined 12.6% in San Jose. The country’s three largest mega regions — Chicago, New York and Los Angeles — all lost tech jobs over the past decade. In contrast, double-digit rate expansions of tech employment have occurred in lower-density metro areas such as Austin, Texas; Raleigh, N.C.; Columbus, Ohio; Houston and Salt Lake City. Indeed, among the larger established tech regions, the only real winners have been Seattle, with its diversified and heavily suburbanized economy, and greater Washington, D.C., the parasitical beneficiary of an ever-expanding federal power, where the number of STEM jobs grew 21% from 2001 to 2012, better than any other of the 51 largest U.S. metropolitan statistical areas over that period."  Read more.


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

" Facebook LinkedIn and Twitter only have 6500 empolyees" crazy to think that these million dollar companys have such few employess. This article has shown me that in the economy nothing is a gurrantee. Companys like Groupon and Zynga had ingenius ideas that quickly became nationally known brands are treading water while still in the infancy of their corporation. This difinetly is partly due to their local areas being not very cost effective. So to make it in this world you need a good idea and to hub your company in a middle tier city where it is most cost effective.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 14, 2013 5:10 AM

Goes to the 2013 FRQ #1

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Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side

Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side | Geography | Scoop.it
Though he never actually crossed it, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras is sometimes credited with having first conceived of the Equator, calculating its location on the Earth’s sphere more than four centuries before the birth of Christ.

Via Tony Hall, Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Definitly changed my way of thinking. also this brings up the many flaws with pre geospatial desinged maps. cartographers could push their own agenda to make their country or area look more promient than it actually is. also another prime example of something that has been taken as fact for many years (nobody questions a world map) and turns out to have some flaws

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Tony Hall's curator insight, May 23, 2013 5:31 PM

This is a very thought provoking article. I like seeing the established conventions challanged. I also like the conversations around the sense of superiority possed by the Northern Hemisphere. Enjoy!

Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 24, 2013 4:48 AM

This is an interesting article on some Earth-Sun relationships that challenges the dominant north-centered normative view of how to think about our planet.  My favorite tidbit of information: "The velocity of the Earth’s rotation varies depending on where you stand: 1,000 mph at the Equator versus almost zero at the poles. That means that the fastest sunrises and sunsets on the planet occur on the Equator, and centrifugal and inertial forces are also much greater there. "

Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks's comment, May 24, 2013 8:09 AM
Great article to include in our summer assignment packet!
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The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | Geography | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2013 3:04 PM

These statistics only include documented migrants although the number of undocumented migration (mostly from Latin America and the Caribbean) has declined since 2007. 


Tagsmigration.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, June 6, 2013 9:57 AM

add your insight...

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Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Very insightful video about the forgotten bored of America. This video points out many exclaves that have the potential to cause serious problems in the future if one of them has a chance of finacial windfall. I think its crazy that these exclaves can still exsit with the growth of border security. I think a way to solve many of these problems would be to rule that nobody can move to these areas and once all the inhabitants left chalk it up and decide which country gets each one by a simple draft. But this would never happen because things have to be complicated.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 30, 4:29 PM

Glad to see two countries like Canada and America can get along over these bizarre borders. I think many countries in the Middle East would fight over those small pieces of land. I think we avoid violence over these borders because we have such a good relationship with Canada.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 4:28 PM

The video highlights a bunch irregularities along the US/Canadian border. Among them, the zigzag 49th not-so-parallel, a small island which is actually a disputed territory, and another US island which is far closer to Canada than it is Washington state causing high school students to have to cross international borders four times to attend school.



This is an interesting video in that it shows how even in the recent past how difficult it was to clearly and conclusively delineate the border between the US and Canada. The fact that there is still a disputed island between two very friendly nations. This only makes it more clear why much older, less friendly nations would have heated disputes over territory.

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 6:46 AM

Did you know the geometric boundary between US and Canada (the longest border in the world) is also a physical border? Check it out.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Geography | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

In the literall sense these colonial powers are no more. All theses countries have theire own form of indepenece and many have o officall ties to their mother countries. But what theses mother countries did to many of their colonies was cut them down at the knees where ther would need to continually rely on the mother for help or face damnation. These mother countries make alot of the commercial decsions for their previous colonial states and with that they hold the power to affect the whole nation.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 7:27 AM

This infographic was very interesting.  By using color coding it highlights the areas of influence the colonel powers still maintain over their old possessions.  This map is helpful in understanding how this affects the politics of theses regions today.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 9:59 AM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 1:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | Geography | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 12, 2013 9:36 PM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 12, 2013 9:36 PM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

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Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger | Geography | Scoop.it
The supercheap and palatable noodles help low-wage workers around the world get by, anthropologists argue in a new book. And rather than lament the ascendance of this highly processed food, they argue we should try to make it more nutritious.

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Its pretty crazy to think something as simple as ramen noodles can help feed billions of people. in the western world iramen is the butt currently for running jokes about poor college kids, i never thought it would have this impact. I can now say that ramen is a nessicty in some areas. Who cares about the slight health affects because if some of this people didnt have ramen they would already be dead from starvation. 

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:06 PM

Ramen became an essential food to help the people who were starving all over the world. This food is cheap to buy and easy to make so it is a perfect food to feed millions of people who are starving everyday. The only bad thing about it is that it is not very healthy to be eating constantly. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:32 PM

I think everyone has had ramen noodles at some point in there life. I do enjoy ramen noodles here and there but couldn't eat it daily. I have found in some of my cookbooks they use ramen noodles in their recipes. It is mostly the quick and easy recipes.  if we are the 6th highest country that purchases ramen noodles I am convinced everyone eats it. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 12:12 PM

I am sure almost every person in this country has eaten instant noodles at one point in their life. Due to the fact they are very cheap and enjoyable. Today, many impoverished people all over the world eat these instant noodles, as they are economical. Although they are not a nutritious, they can temporarily relieve people’s hunger.

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Geographic Midpoint Calculator, Find Your Personal Center of Gravity

Geographic Midpoint Calculator, Find Your Personal Center of Gravity | Geography | Scoop.it
Finds the exact point that lies halfway between two or more places. Find your personal center of gravity--the geographic average location for all of the places you have lived in.

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Very insightful tool when it comes to travelling or family reunions. i personally used this for a while to figure out a good place for me and my friends from chicago/trenton to met up and it brought me to the middle of penn. also this was pretty fun just to mess around with to see random midpoint locations between two places.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2013 10:52 AM

This is a fun tool to make geographic analysis very personal.  You can also weight the importance of the locations based on the number of years stayed at a location. 

Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:37 AM
Find your personal center of gravity. Select all cities or addresses where you have lived, then view those places on a map along with a marker pointing at your exact average location.Where is it?______________________________________ Find the midpoint of a flight between Haddonfield and:              SAN JOSE_______________________              NEW ORLEANS___________________________              FARGO, N.D. ______________________________              SAN FRANCISCO___________________________               ORLANDO, FLA.___________________________________Locate the midpoint for where you hope to go to school:______________________________________________You are going to initiate a family reunion. Choose 6 family members and find a center location that will be fair and equitable for those who are traveling. Where are the 6 family members coming from? 1.____________________________2._____________________________3.________________________________4._____________________________ 5.______________________________ 6.____________________________ Where will the reunion take place?___________________________________________Find a central place in Haddonfield for  a new business or facility that will serve all of the folks in Haddonfield. here will that be?__________________________________________NJSIAA want to build a multi sport facility for football and track. Where should this facility be constructed?_________________________________________________________
Nancy Watson's curator insight, December 29, 2013 7:05 AM

Fun geographic activity

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Rethinking Agriculture

"Growing Power is a national nonprofit organization and land trust supporting people from diverse backgrounds, and the environments in which they live, by helping to provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities."


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

with the increasing numbers of urban citizens in years to come the key to success in the city will be its ability to adapted to its growing enviroment. It would be nearly impossible for cities to exsit in the future with the current ways of agriculuture, there needs to be a change in the way things are done. Thats why this next gen way of agriculuture is going to take off in urban areas. with the ability to have full farms on rooftops the city will be able to self sustain itself more properly than it does in current times.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:19 PM

I think it is very important for people to have access to fresh healthy foods if its desired. Living in cities can cause this to not happen as much due to location. More of the fresh foods are produced outside of cities in rural areas. By growing plants in this green room in a city it gives people access to fresh foods. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:40 PM

For the past three years I have had the luxury of having a garden in my backyard, it is a lot of work but there is nothing better than knowing where my food is coming from. I enjoy going in my backyard and being able to grab vegetables whenever I need them. I also go to farmers markets for vegetables that I don't grow in my own garden.  I would defeniately support local people to get good quality food. 

Lauren Shigemasa's curator insight, January 22, 10:28 PM

a powerful way to increase access to healthy foods! this organization called Growing Power is using urban gardening not only to create a sustainable food source for its neighbors, but also provides a system so we can donate and send a week's worth of fresh fruit/vegetables to any surrounding community in need. so amazing!

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1/5 of Humanity

1/5 of Humanity | Geography | Scoop.it

"The world divided into 5 regions, each with the population of China."


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

This map is mind blowning to try to grasp. To think that India has an equvilant population to every country in the Americans has me dumbfounded. Then comparin the economic instability of India to all the economic juggernauts that fit into the light blue regions really shows how poor the distrubution of wealth and population is throught the world.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:15 PM

Population and liveability are connected. Population distribution and density influence the characterisics from places - at all scales ( region, continent, country, state ,city, neighbourhood)

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 11, 2013 12:10 PM

Your thoughts...?

Trish Pearson's curator insight, April 9, 12:33 PM

A little perspective on population

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World's Most Thrilling Airports

World's Most Thrilling Airports | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Most people are scared enough to even go on a plan much less having to deal with some of these runways. This horrid runways include high altitude, short runways or even 90 degree turns to even advance onto the runway. Pretty scary if i might say so myself. Im surprised the St Maartens runways didn make the list with its threat of hitting a popular beach in the local proximity.

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sonia monetti's curator insight, October 24, 2013 7:16 AM

scherzetto............

Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 27, 2013 1:02 PM

Amazing !!!

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:02 PM

Some of these airports look to me as if planes won't make it. The one in Portugal goes over mountains and trees and is very short. Flying can be terrifying as it is but landing on some of these airport can be more nerve racking. This raises a question, was this the only land area these countries had to build a runway? 

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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

No surprise here that the countries that are more well off generally have less of a gender gap. One thing that i like to point out about this article is that the united states came in 23rd which i think is pretty humerous since we pride outselfs on our rights and equality but were not even in the top 20 countries in the world when it comes down to equality between genders. The biggest surprise of this article though has to be nicaragua coming in 10th even though every country around it scored poorly. hopefully the nicaraguans can teach their fellow costa ricans and houndurans how to close the gap.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, October 28, 2013 10:08 AM

For students:

Analyze the map and determine where the United States ranks in terms of the gender gap. Explain any information on this map that surprises you. Make predictions about some possible factors that determine the extent of a country's gender gap.

 

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 3:06 PM

Interesting data!

xavia's comment, April 9, 9:38 PM
gender gap chloropleth
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States With Most and Least Stress

States With Most and Least Stress | Geography | Scoop.it

"For the past five years, Hawaii has consistently ranked as the least stressed state, while West Virginia, Kentucky, and Utah have been among the most stressed states. Despite this, Utah residents join Hawaii residents in reporting among the highest levels of enjoyment in the U.S., while West Virginia and Kentucky residents report some of the lowest levels of enjoyment.  While the relationship between stress and enjoyment is not clear, states with the highest stress levels tend to report less daily enjoyment."


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Woohoo!! Most stressful state. This is no surprise with Rhode Island only being behind Neveda for highest unemploment. Also the poor quality can easily make up that .9% which put us in the lead. This article also goes to show that if you live in a beautiful place your more likely to have a higher enjoyment the concrete jungles.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 29, 2013 5:06 AM

In addition to being the state with the least joy, Rhode Island is ranked as the 2nd most stressed out state.  I think that means it's time to to get out of the Ocean State for a while. 


Questions to Ponder: what are some factors that may account for this regional variation?  What explains your states relative levels of stress and enjoyment?   

Amber Nicole Bogie's curator insight, May 29, 2013 9:00 AM

I can guess what Hawaii is the least stressed. Where does your state rank and why? 

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West Wing - Why are we changing maps? - YouTube

From season 2 - episode 16 "Somebody's Going to Emergency, Somebody's Going to Jail" It's "Big Block of Cheese" Day, which means that Leo sends grumbling sta...
Steven Flis's insight:

This video is a perfect example of how we shouldnt use a universal map. A map like the Mercator may be better for boating routes but as the episode shows it changes the overall view of the world when taken out of context.

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Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders

Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders | Geography | Scoop.it
Pretty wild, right? It's a map of Pangea — a supercontinent that formed roughly 300 million years ago — mapped with contemporary geopolitical borders.

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

My favorite part about this map has to be its unintentionaly demographich connecter (If that even makes sense) for example along the south east part of the united states their are alot of latin americans and on this map the two continents are brought closer to each other to match the cultural demogaphic. To continue this the east coast and dixie are have a massive african american population. and again the african continent is brought close to people who have ancestreal roots to it. I know that pangea is not the reason why each culture settled in its respetive area just funny how well that worked out.

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Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, June 4, 2013 4:59 AM

This may answer so many of the logistical questions we wondered about staring at a globe in 4th grade. Really clears up the puzzle pieces.

Padmanabhan Jaikumar's comment, June 4, 2013 9:57 PM
may be answers to many questions
Magnus Gustafsson's comment, June 11, 2013 11:37 PM
Tnanks! This map makes it easier to understand our world right now.
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Geography of Aspiration

Geography of Aspiration | Geography | Scoop.it
Try to replicate it with development schemes all you want, but you're overlooking what makes New York City—and other places of ambition—so great.

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

This reminds me of the production method idea you taught us where even though you may be able to produce 2 products better than a third world country it is for the best if you have them do what they excel at while you do your thing. (You made a lebron james reference in class). the reason why im connecting this is because every city has its own thing to offer with San fran being the arts portland with the mom and pop shops and new york with the enterainment. if you can excel at what you do then your city can blossom.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 4, 2013 8:38 PM

Part of the economic success of a city can be an overriding cultural ethos of the metropolitan area.  This elusive spirit of the city is often referred to as a sense of place, which many sound 'fluffy' to some, but can have some very tangible impacts on the urban economic development.  This article answers the question, "How does a sense of place impact urban economic development?" by using various U.S. cities such as New York City, Portland and San Francisco.  


Tags: urban, economic, place, neighborhood.

Dean Haakenson's comment, June 6, 2013 8:30 AM
Very cool.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 3:31 PM

I think that historical opportunity is what makes NYC so great... well, great as implied by the writers of this article.  Having a good history, it is only natural that it would become something so popular and draw the ambitious to it.  In contrast, a newly formed colony of humans on Mars would be potentially better- because in this hypothetical/planned colony, people would be able to benefit from the fact that they are building from the ground up, from scratch, and with the knowledge of other development schemes/trends that occurred elsewhere.  This could entirely circumvent all ill aspects of society... Sometimes to create, one must first destroy... perhaps NYC should be rebuilt to eliminate problems, before humans move on to other worlds?  I thought NY was a bit of a mess when I drove through with my cousin.  The graffiti was gorgeous, but the filth and traffic were quite triumphant, and it is not a place where my ambition would lead me.  I think true talent will be found, regardless of this subliminal advertisment brought about by the article endorsing NYC as a 'place of ambition.'  Not all of us can go to these 'meccas' of talent... but it doesn't mean we are any less extravagent as life forms.  I would ask if most people would want to make it big in places like that, or if they would rather be happier, elsewhere.

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The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth? | Geography | Scoop.it
What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet?

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Its been known that Americans have lavish lifestyles compared to outher populous countries. In this article they show a represntation if the entire world lived like (had as much space) americans and it was astoudning. It would take 4 earths to fit the world if everyone had this lavish lifestyle. So we obviously need to change our ways. Cities ae very helpful to sharing this earth. They serve as a main hub so youll only have to ship to a few places. This with the shortening of distances would save tons of gas and othe rescources. But as the article states everyone living in a Main city wouldnt be possible because people need to produce outside the city. So in my opinion for this city world to work it would need to be a few megacities preferably one on each continent and for them to the city be surronded by production methods.

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Magnus Gustafsson's comment, May 1, 2013 11:59 PM
Yes. Keviin. I think the infograph about developed countries are most interesting and useful for my students.
Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 4:40 PM

cool

Peter Hillman's curator insight, July 22, 8:42 PM

An interactive site for comparisons of city sizes

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Population Density

Population Density | Geography | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

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Izzy Bennett's comment, October 7, 2013 1:26 PM
I love this map because it really shows how the population is spread out across the world. It's amazing how Australia and Canada are practically empty, especially compared to China and India!
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 3:22 PM
I really liked this map, because it showed me how spread out we are. I actually didnt realize the world was THIS populated!
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 2:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

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Hydraulic Fracking

Hydraulic Fracking | Geography | Scoop.it

"Hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking', is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside."

 


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Great visual aid about the dangers of fracking. this article is obviously siding with antifracking beliefs so it may be a little biest but in all honest facking may be the worst form of producing energy in the past 100 years. Offshore drilling may be unpleseant to see but as long as it dont exploded then the ecosystem around it stays intak. Fracking on the other hand can be evident miles down the road with chemtrails and runoff. I can understand why people do alot of things for money but devastating the local water supply when there is multiple new ways to produce clean energy is just shameful. 

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:07 AM

Fracking is happening in some peoples backyards and it is effecting how they live. People are directly in this unhealthy atmosphere. It is causing bad things to happen to peoples health. It is especially ruining their water which is needed to cook, drink, and clean. Water is needed in our everyday lives to survive and fracking is contaminating their water. 

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:37 PM

Hydrographic Turing puts people in  safety and health risks. Because the water is contaminated and because of the oil spills, blow outs, and fires. They put chemicals into the ground in order to make cracks in the earth to collect natural oil, but they use people's land in order to collect the oil. People are complaining about these industries because they now have to buy water every month instead of getting it from their sinks or wells. Not to mention some houses have already blew up or caught on favor thanks to hydro fracturing. They need to put a stop to this, at least do it on land that is not being used and far away from people.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:07 PM

The development of gas is important for energy but there are health and safety risks with cracking in neighborhoods. Quality of air and water is important for survival. Nature matters and people matter, they need to find a middle ground. 

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Geography | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Perfect example of modern globalization. Part of Nutella is made on evey continent but Antartica. This would be impossible 100 years ago or without the invention of shipping containers. This Nutella phenomhas taken the world by stop and its all because of globalization.

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:35 AM

great for unit on globalisation and fair trade

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 10:26 AM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 12:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

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Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data

Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data | Geography | Scoop.it

"By using Facebook data from the 2.5 million people in New York or New England that ‘like’ either the Red Sox or Yankees I was able to create a more accurate rivalry map than ever before."


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Pretty neat use of mapping and facebook to create this. This map is around the idea of what i expected it to look like with a few exceptions. As a yankee fan i expected a little bit more out of fellow Rhode Islanders when it came to the distribution but i guess i was wrong. i would also like to point out that cultural diversity probably has a role to play in this, with western connecticut being more ethnically diverse than eastern.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 21, 2013 6:48 PM

Sports maps with team logos on them are often hand-drawn works of art without much data to back them up--not so with this map.  Read the article to find the actual data which is much messier than these bold color proclaim.  These regions aren't homogenous (are they ever?) but this is the best fit line between the major groups of fans, showing that Connecticut is the true 'battle ground' for this regional rivalry. 


Tags: sport, statistics, mapping, regions, Rhode Island, Boston, NYC.

John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:12 AM

A fun map i can relate to a lot being a New Yorker living in RI. I also believe theres more Yankee fans in Red Sox territory then Red Sox fans in Yankee territory.

trampolinecalf's comment, September 26, 2013 11:55 PM
nice
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Protests and the World Cup

Protests and the World Cup | Geography | Scoop.it
Fury, anarchy, martyrdom: Why the youth of Brazil are (forever) protesting, and how their anger may consume the World Cup.

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

(Sidebar I used this article while gathering information for my research paper). Even though this is happening in Brazil i would like to beleive that this is exaclty what the United States founding fathers would of wanted us to do if our goverment was blatanly mistreating us like the politicians in Brazil. The youth of brazil realized what a moumentus occasion this was and didnt waste their chance to show the world their problems which forced the hand of the politicians into a political reform. Great example of how can make a difference if you have enough followers.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 8, 2013 12:56 AM

it is great to know that young people in countries like Brazil are standing up and being heard though it costs some their lives to protest social ills. it is interesting how sporting events  like the World Cup or usually tied to government and poltics. A country wants to show the world the best that their country has, but these young people are letting the world know that the poor are being overlooked, and what the opulance of big cities and beautiful stadiums does not reflect how poor people are being overlooked. I support these demonstraters and it is important that young people everywhere gain the courage to protest for Just causes

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 10:49 PM

These protests, though partially caused by events going on currently, could not have come at a worse time.  If this civil unrest continues into the days of the 2014 World Cup, there could be darker days for Brazil lying ahead.  Adding millions of tourists to the mix is certainly not going to help the problem.  If this problem is not fixed, it will have big implications for the 2016 summer olympics that are set to happen in Rio.  All the preparation that has gone into preparing for these events will all be for naught if the events are plagued by civil unrest and protests. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 11:08 AM

This is about so much more than the World Cup. It is protest against government corruption and politicians lining their pockets with money under the guise of public works.

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Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | Geography | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

In this modern age the words health and cheap are rarley paired together and especiall not in Agriculture. Farmers have to make the decision wether they want to be profitable and continue their family farm or to try to be organinc and continue their families practices. Its nearly impossible to combine the two. What mr thompson decided to do is common among the farming community and that is to pruduce crops with high profit yeilds such as GM soy but also take the nessacary precautions to not danger the surronding enviroment. Hopefully in the future healthier farming is mor profitable farming so people wont have to straddle this moral line.

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Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 27, 8:24 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 8:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 8:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Geography | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


Via Seth Dixon
Steven Flis's insight:

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, November 8, 2013 8:06 PM

Remember we talked about megacities last week?

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:12 AM

The mega city revlution has started and accroing to stastics its only to get more popular. The creattion of these mega cities has trasformed where people want to live, while also helping to bring nations stability though creation on these mega cities. It was said that with in 30 years more than 60% of the population will live in cities. Theses megacities are desirable, they help to stablize a country and have almost doubbled in number since the 1990's. It will be intereesting to see how the effects of megacites play out on the eniorment and ecnomny in the futre though.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.