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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


Via Seth Dixon
steve smith's insight:

A great look at urbanisation. 

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 5, 2014 2:37 PM

La urbanización Y EVOLUCIÓN De Las Ciudades.

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 2014 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges | Geography | Scoop.it
Want to learn more about the issues surrounding poverty in the world today? We ve assembled a collection of some of the best data visualizations for just that.

Via Seth Dixon
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data visualisations to show poverty and it's causes

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Erica Senffner's curator insight, June 9, 2014 11:01 AM

Unit 6

Helen Rowling's curator insight, June 10, 2014 6:37 PM

STUDY OF RELIGION - COMPARISONS OF HAVE & HAVE NOTS.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:45 PM

APHG-Unit 2

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Geography | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


Via Seth Dixon
steve smith's insight:

Where are the poorest people in the world ?

 

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

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Cynthia S. – Google+ - We should know more about basic geography... I don't think…

Cynthia S. – Google+ - We should know more about basic geography... I don't think… | Geography | Scoop.it
We should know more about basic geography... I don't think that will change any time soon. (We should know more about basic geography... I don't think that will change any time soon.
steve smith's insight:

Basic geography makes you a more informed and interesting person. 

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Spatial Navigation Before GPS

Spatial Navigation Before GPS | Geography | Scoop.it

"Giant 70-foot concrete arrows that point your way across the country, left behind by a forgotten age of US mail delivery.  Long before the days of radio (and those convenient little smartphone applications), the US Postal service began a cross-country air mail service using army war surplus planes from World War I.  The federal government funded enormous concrete arrows to be built every 10 miles or so along established airmail routes they were each built alongside a 50 foot tall tower with a rotating gas-powered light. These airway beacons are said to have been visible from a distance of 10 miles high."


Via Seth Dixon
steve smith's insight:

this looks cool - will have to check them out on G earth !

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:49 PM

Adesso sembra incredibile che si usasse un sistema simile per guidare la posta aerea. Forse a quei tempi sembrava normale. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:14 AM

I love articles like this one where they talk about the collide of different times. This article speaks of huge concrete arrows which were left from 1930's air mail routes. sadly most of the towers that were paired with the arrows have been dismantled but still really cool that these directional arrows from the past can still be found almost 90 years later.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:44 PM

Wow technology has come a long way in just a short amount of time! We would still be using  those stone arrows if it wasn't for the invention of the GPS. 

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Letter from Africa: Kenya, a nation of firsts

Letter from Africa: Kenya, a nation of firsts | Geography | Scoop.it
In our series of letters from African journalists, a week after it was announced that vast quantities of underground water had been discovered in Turkana - an arid, poor region of Kenya where oil was also recently found - Joseph Warungu considers...

Via Mr. David Burton
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Water found in Kenya - lots of it !

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Tracy Klug's curator insight, September 23, 2013 8:40 AM

How will the development of this area differ from the Bakken region in North Dakota?  Will we see boom and bust cities or sustainable development?

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History and Today: morphing into geography: 'spatial cultures'

Last time I blogged about going to the RGS-IBG conference at the end of August; I've just attended 'Spatial Cultures', a workshop-symposium at UCL. In some ways the day was a similar experience to that of the RGS-IBG ...
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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Geography | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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» Want a place with ‘great coffee’ or ‘free wifi’? Google Maps now lets you search descriptively. » Google

» Want a place with ‘great coffee’ or ‘free wifi’? Google Maps now lets you search descriptively. » Google | Geography | Scoop.it

Google today announced that it has added descriptive terms to Places listings provided in the sidebar of Google Maps.

In a blog post, it said that these terms would condense reviews ...


Via Richard Swandel
steve smith's insight:

so useful for a traveller !

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


Via Seth Dixon
steve smith's insight:

A great look at urbanisation. 

more...
Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 5, 2014 2:37 PM

La urbanización Y EVOLUCIÓN De Las Ciudades.

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 2014 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single J...

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single J... | Geography | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla... Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD.
steve smith's insight:

Food geography is so interesting, it alson touches on globalisation for food too. 

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How the geography of world obesity has shifted

How the geography of world obesity has shifted | Geography | Scoop.it
For the last few years, food scarcity and the effects of industrial food have co-existed, often within the same demographic circle and within countries. This is no contradiction (although it demand...
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Mid-Point, Distance, Gradient and The Simpsons - Resources - TES Australia

Mid-Point, Distance, Gradient and The Simpsons - Resources - TES Australia | Geography | Scoop.it
Using Geogebra and a story line from The Simpsons to explore the coordinate geometry concepts of Mid-Point, Distance and Gradient. Updated version (Geometry concepts with The Simpsons (yes, really!
steve smith's insight:

student interest ? tick 

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30 Truths Only A Physical Geography Student Will Understand

No, it's not just colouring in.
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Why geography is cool ! And useful too

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A legal battle – Hot springs, mud pools and geysers – Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand

A legal battle – Hot springs, mud pools and geysers – Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand | Geography | Scoop.it
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The closure of the bores in rotorua in the 1980s great for tourism development topic

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Geography | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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What is the Purpose of Using Technology in the Classroom?

What is the Purpose of Using Technology in the Classroom? | Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 6, 2013 7:33 PM

Using technology in education is incredibly important today...but we must remember WHY we want our students using these tools and not accidentally make the tool itself the objective. 

Pamela Hall's curator insight, August 22, 2013 10:20 AM

This theme carries over to the business world too. Business owners need to realize that understanding the technology available and how to use it's tools can have a major impact on their businesses. "What do you want your business to do with technology?" 

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:50 AM

Absolutely true!

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The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | Geography | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:17 PM

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:58 AM

Is not a surprise that illegal immigrants have been decreasing since 2007, because the economy crisis and the borders.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:34 PM

Immigration has been an ongoing issue and the problem of border hopping doesn't make it any better. Of course numbers are going to vary from year to year. This article discusses where US immigrants come from and how the immigration changes over time. In 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they mostly come from Asia and Africa. Also, these statistics are only based off of legal immigrations. We cant forget the ones that just hop the border in their free time. As stated in the article, it has been estimated that there are about 11.1 million illegal immigrants in the United States. A majority of them come from Latin America and the Caribbean. With that being said, legal immigrants still make up the biggest chunk of the foreign population in the United States and the population only continues to grow.