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Rescooped by Simon from GTAV AC:G Y8 - Landforms and landscapes
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Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders

Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders | Geography | Scoop.it
“ Pretty wild, right? It's a map of Pangea -- a supercontinent that formed roughly 300 million years ago -- mapped with contemporary geopolitical borders.”
Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, October 15, 2013 5:59 AM

CD - The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform.

Rescooped by Simon from Geography Education
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Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | Geography | Scoop.it
As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”
Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:36 AM

summer reading KQ2: How have humans altered the Earth's environment?  Water Security

Rescooped by Simon from GEP Water resources
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Fresh water for all

Fresh water for all | Geography | Scoop.it
Freshwater is one of today’s most pressing developmental challenges, impacting food & agriculture, gender equality, health & sanitation, population

Via Marilyn Snider
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Marilyn Snider's curator insight, February 20, 2013 7:46 AM

This graphic clearly explains what water "cooperation" means, now and in the future.

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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | Geography | Scoop.it
“Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.”
Via Seth Dixon
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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 2014 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | Geography | Scoop.it
"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."
Via Seth Dixon
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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 2014 12:09 PM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2014 5:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:44 PM

APHG-U2