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Agricultural and Rural Farm Use

Agricultural and Rural Farm Use | Geography | Scoop.it

"Feedlots, a new series of images crafted by British artist Mishka Henner, uses publicly available satellite imagery to show the origins of mass-produced meat products."

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.  


Via Seth Dixon, Molly Diallo
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

British artist Mishka Henner took photographs and enhanced the colors of feedlots to reveal the agribusiness of meat production. Photographs of feedlots are considered illegal and the legal repercussions of Mishka Henner are not clear at the moment, but the photographs are shocking and reveal again how little Americans know about their food production. 

Americans have changed the places and utilized them to build agribusiness empires and have introduced new problems to the landscape of feedlot and farming towns.

 

more...
Angel Brian Gutierrez Gardeazabal's curator insight, September 29, 2013 2:17 PM

Ag-gag laws.... Nunca volvere a comer comida que no sea de mi linda Bolivia

Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 3:00 PM

Does this motivate you to become #vegetarian? 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:19 AM

Some wild photgraphs about the devastation of mass aggriculture to the enviroment. Also their is a nice little bit about the laws behind why most people havent seen farming conditions till recent, such as some states preventing people to take pictures of their farms or factories without consent. If you are intreged by this article i suggest you watch FOOD Inc. This movie goes into great detail about how our food is made. But caution this may be one instance where igroance is Bliss because once you know exactly how your food is made you may never be able to eat some meats again. This movie can also be found on Netflix.

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Nature and Perspectives of Geography

Nature and Perspectives of Geography | Geography | Scoop.it
Isolation, crowding and food: Is Egypt a victim of its geography?
Globe and Mail
Setting aside all human intent, we are still looking at a desperate situation, because what is happening now is systemic, and peculiar to Egypt and its geography.

Via Molly Diallo
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

The geography of Egypt has brought about problems for them such as isolation, crowding, and food issues, leading to political and economic problems as well.

The physical characteristics of Egypt's place hinder it's economic development as the majority of the land is desert except for the Nile river causing crowding or urban spaces around the delta and competing with agriculture.

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Population

Population | Geography | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."


Via Seth Dixon, Molly Diallo
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

more...
Helen Rowling's curator insight, August 21, 2013 1:13 AM

Gr8 Info simplifying stats.

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 27, 2013 12:49 PM

Un conjunto de sencillas infografias para visualizar estadisticas de la humanidad en el tiempo presente

trampolinecalf's comment, September 26, 2013 11:46 PM
good one
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Cultural Patterns and Processes

Cultural Patterns and Processes | Geography | Scoop.it
Challenge yourself to identify some seventy languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.

Via Seth Dixon, Molly Diallo
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

A game where you can test your knowledge of global tongues only by sound.

The knowledge of languages is important in movement especially for migrants and immigrants and participators in global trade.

more...
IrineLogs's comment, September 12, 2013 11:32 PM
Fun and knowledge toghether!How nice..........
Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 11:21 AM
This certainly was interesting! It was challenging to identify some languages, and others you could figure out right away. Some of them I had never even heard of! Being exposed to a few languages growing up I thought I would be better at this, but I was very wrong. It is a little disappointing knowing that many people are not exposed to the many languages our world has to offer. It is also disheartening to hear many people get offended when people do not speak English here, when really America has no national dialect. I know that many schools require students to take a different language in high school, but it only the more common ones that are becoming popular in the U.S. (Spanish, French, Portuguese, etc.). Maybe some day children will become more exposed to the many different languages that have grown across the globe.
Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 1:52 PM

Make sure you look up the languages that you don't know to determine where they're spoken.

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Industrialization and Economic Development

Industrialization and Economic Development | Geography | Scoop.it
In the early 80′s, Bob Geldof of the band called The Boomtown Rats saw in the news the massive famine engulfing the African country of Ethiopia....

Via Molly Diallo
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

Though Geldof and the development of Live Aid tried to lessen the harsh conditions of certain African countries and other economically stunted states, these countries continue to stay among the "poorest" in the world.

Countries with economic issues come mainly from troubles with the post-colonialism era and their place of people and resources. Ethnic troubles and lack of resources or transportation methods keeps these countries in the Less Developed category.

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Agricultural and Rural Farm Use

Agricultural and Rural Farm Use | Geography | Scoop.it

"Feedlots, a new series of images crafted by British artist Mishka Henner, uses publicly available satellite imagery to show the origins of mass-produced meat products."

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.  


Via Seth Dixon, Molly Diallo
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

British artist Mishka Henner took photographs and enhanced the colors of feedlots to reveal the agribusiness of meat production. Photographs of feedlots are considered illegal and the legal repercussions of Mishka Henner are not clear at the moment, but the photographs are shocking and reveal again how little Americans know about their food production. 

Americans have changed the places and utilized them to build agribusiness empires and have introduced new problems to the landscape of feedlot and farming towns.

 

more...
Angel Brian Gutierrez Gardeazabal's curator insight, September 29, 2013 2:17 PM

Ag-gag laws.... Nunca volvere a comer comida que no sea de mi linda Bolivia

Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 3:00 PM

Does this motivate you to become #vegetarian? 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:19 AM

Some wild photgraphs about the devastation of mass aggriculture to the enviroment. Also their is a nice little bit about the laws behind why most people havent seen farming conditions till recent, such as some states preventing people to take pictures of their farms or factories without consent. If you are intreged by this article i suggest you watch FOOD Inc. This movie goes into great detail about how our food is made. But caution this may be one instance where igroance is Bliss because once you know exactly how your food is made you may never be able to eat some meats again. This movie can also be found on Netflix.

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Agricultural and Rural Land Use

Agricultural and Rural Land Use | Geography | Scoop.it
A disease called coffee rust has reached epidemic proportions in Central America, threatening the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of farmers and the morning pick-me-up of millions of coffee drinkers.

Via Matt Richardson
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

A new disease has affected the agribusiness of coffee both for small and large businesses. Production has slowed and supply is not as high, causing prices to rise and jobs to be closed. New diseases also bring opportunities to develop new genes of coffee plants to keep the crop capable of resisting the disease and continue to meet demand. 

With the possible new development of coffee gene strands, Human/Environment Interaction takes it's next step in the latest Agricultural Revolution.

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Matt Richardson's curator insight, May 19, 11:24 AM

This story has me sad. Very sad. I drink a lot of coffee.  Coffee is one of the world's most traded commodities. Of far greater importance than my own "first-world problem" of paying more for coffee is the impact this globalized disease will have on rural farmers in Latin America. 

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Political Organization of Spaces

Political Organization of Spaces | Geography | Scoop.it
A color-coded map of the country's religious and ethnic groups helps explain why the fighting is so bad.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

This map colorfully displays the ethnic populations in Syria (and surrounding countries). While viewing this map it's hard to imagine that, even with the Sunni Muslims making up the majority of Islam, the Alawites are in power. The ethic conflict develops from a minority leadership that focus fully on their minority and don't have enough understanding to respond to the other ethnic groups, thus the minority group ends up imposing their own ethnicity upon the majority and the other ethnic groups. Not only is there a lack of human geographic knowledge inside the powers of Syria (which have already caused violent out breaks) but there was a lack of geographic knowledge when European colonists created the borders in the Middle East. Ethnic groups were pushed together and forced to occupy the same state with a leader who isn't aware of all the needs or opinions of the different ethnicities. Violence was sure to break out as it has in other Middle East countries and Africa.

The major cause of political instability and ethnic fighting is due to the way the states are organized with no regard to ethnicities. The location of resources and of the cultures keeps the tension high.

more...
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, August 29, 2013 9:54 AM

This map colorfully displays the ethnic populations in Syria (and surrounding countries). While viewing this map it's hard to imagine that, even with the Sunni Muslims making up the majority of Islam, the Alawites are in power. The ethic conflict develops from a minority leadership that focus fully on their minority and don't have enough understanding to respond to the other ethnic groups, thus the minority group ends up imposing their own ethnicity upon the majority and the other ethnic groups. Not only is there a lack of human geographic knowledge inside the powers of Syria (which have already caused violent out breaks) but there was a lack of geographic knowledge when European colonists created the borders in the Middle East. Ethnic groups were pushed together and forced to occupy the same state with a leader who isn't aware of all the needs or opinions of the different ethnicities. Violence was sure to break out as it has in other Middle East countries and Africa.

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Cultural Patterns and Processes

Cultural Patterns and Processes | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

This map conveys the population of Mormons in each state. The sizes of the states are presented as corresponding the the Mormon population in each. The map links to more than what it shows. When you ask why are so many Mormons in Utah you can look into the past of Utah and the past of Mormons and you will find that Mormons settled in Utah following one of their leaders. You can then even ask the question why are Mormons still migrating to Utah or the question why did they stay there. Human geography can help us find the answers to these questions. A shared ideology among the community. A lack of repercussion for being open about their belief. A sense of belonging. Family connections. Human Geography help us unravel these mysteries which were brought to our attention by a simple map.

Regional spaces of Mormon's (such as the rather Formal region of Utah) are shown through the map and show the distribution of Mormonism throughout the world.

more...
Nelson Slade's comment, September 1, 2013 2:58 PM
It's very interesting to instead of seeing the world from a political and geological standpoint it shows a map from a religious standpoint. It's very interesting to see how all of the different religion are taken from all over the world and the diversity the united states of america is. this map brings up a lot of topics concerning much of the eastern world as well.
Jacob Ramsey's comment, September 1, 2013 7:42 PM
Its really interesting how a so many people can collaborate on one topic to bring not only the history of a ideal, but the true history of a long line of people that were a big part of the development of the west in the United States. We always learn about how this and that president did something to help the country expand but it would very interesting to see how we as a country grew from the influences of someone outside of our own society. And not only does this book offer maps but it also includes charts and timelines!
Kendall Belleville's comment, September 2, 2013 2:11 PM
It is really cool to see how much of tho religions are in the United States. it is really nice to see that people are being supportive of them. It is interesting that there are large areas of religion and then some areas have very little.
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Agriculture and Rural Land Use

Agriculture and Rural Land Use | Geography | Scoop.it

Want to see where your food might come from in the future? Look up.

 

The seeds of an agricultural revolution are taking root in cities around the world—a movement that boosters say will change the way that urbanites get their produce and solve some of the world's biggest environmental problems along the way.

 

It's called vertical farming, and it's based on one simple principle: Instead of trucking food from farms into cities, grow it as close to home as possible—in urban greenhouses that stretch upward instead of sprawling outward.


Via David Rowing, Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

New forms of agriculture and a growing consumerism of local produce hindered by a lack of space have started a new movement towards vertical farming that allows urban areas to grow local produce close to consumer hubs.

Vertical farming could be considered Human/Environment Interaction as we bring the needed elements of an environment into our urban realms to capture the wants in our lives.

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UN: Refugee numbers at highest in 19 years

UN: Refugee numbers at highest in 19 years | Geography | Scoop.it
Migrant escape routes in focus as thousands risk their lives to flee war, unrest and poverty and reach distant shores.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

Refugees from the Middle East and Afghanistan escape towards Indonesia and Australia as African Refugees head across the Meditterranean towards Europe (especially Italy and Malta). Due to Civil wars, violence, political instability, and poverty, these people are choosing to flee their country in hopes of a new, better life. 

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 28, 9:06 PM

Refugees from the Middle East and Afghanistan escape towards Indonesia and Australia as African Refugees head across the Mediterranean towards Europe (especially Italy and Malta). Due to Civil wars, violence, political instability, and poverty, these people are choosing to flee their country in hopes of a new, better life. 

The movement of refugees introduces many immigration problems and reforms into countries receiving these immigrants. The interaction of cultures also forces assimilation, cultural appropriation, and mixing.

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Describes how people adapt differently to different physical environments

Describes how people adapt differently to different physical environments | Geography | Scoop.it
allAfrica: African news and information for a global audience
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

In Harare, Zimbabwe, illegal businesses are capitalizing on the water restrictions by selling water directly to the people. Harare lacks money to chemically treat their water so they had to put on these restrictions that are allowing these illegal business to grow. Compared to the U.S., where we have our own water businesses (like Nestle and Ozarka), we can draw the differences that in Harare, these businesses are growing out of need, while in the U.S., they are growing out of apathy and convenience. 

more...
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 28, 9:35 PM

In Harare, Zimbabwe, illegal businesses are capitalizing on the water restrictions by selling water directly to the people. Harare lacks money to chemically treat their water so they had to put on these restrictions that are allowing these illegal business to grow. Compared to the U.S., where we have our own water businesses (like Nestle and Ozarka), we can draw the differences that in Harare, these businesses are growing out of need, while in the U.S., they are growing out of apathy and convenience.

The place of Harare, Zimbabwe (with poor water resources) allows these businesses to develop and grow and the need of the people for cleaner water keeps the businesses growing and introduces new competition and jobs.

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Shows how culture shapes a group's way of life and its own view of itself and other groups

Shows how culture shapes a group's way of life and its own view of itself and other groups | Geography | Scoop.it
A color-coded map of the country's religious and ethnic groups helps explain why the fighting is so bad.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

This map colorfully displays the ethnic populations in Syria (and surrounding countries). While viewing this map it's hard to imagine that, even with the Sunni Muslims making up the majority of Islam, the Alawites are in power. The ethic conflict develops from a minority leadership that focus fully on their minority and don't have enough understanding to respond to the other ethnic groups, thus the minority group ends up imposing their own ethnicity upon the majority and the other ethnic groups. Not only is there a lack of human geographic knowledge inside the powers of Syria (which have already caused violent out breaks) but there was a lack of geographic knowledge when European colonists created the borders in the Middle East. Ethnic groups were pushed together and forced to occupy the same state with a leader who isn't aware of all the needs or opinions of the different ethnicities. Violence was sure to break out as it has in other Middle East countries and Africa.

more...
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 28, 9:40 PM

This map colorfully displays the ethnic populations in Syria (and surrounding countries). While viewing this map it's hard to imagine that, even with the Sunni Muslims making up the majority of Islam, the Alawites are in power. The ethic conflict develops from a minority leadership that focus fully on their minority and don't have enough understanding to respond to the other ethnic groups, thus the minority group ends up imposing their own ethnicity upon the majority and the other ethnic groups. Not only is there a lack of human geographic knowledge inside the powers of Syria (which have already caused violent out breaks) but there was a lack of geographic knowledge when European colonists created the borders in the Middle East. Ethnic groups were pushed together and forced to occupy the same state with a leader who isn't aware of all the needs or opinions of the different ethnicities. Violence was sure to break out as it has in other Middle East countries and Africa.

The major cause of political instability and ethnic fighting is due to the way the states are organized with no regard to ethnicities. The location of resources and of the cultures keeps the tension high.

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Agricultural and Rural Land Use

Agricultural and Rural Land Use | Geography | Scoop.it

"The incredible fractal pattern rivers (now dried out) were made as they spread into the salt flats of the arid Baja California Desert in Mexico."


Via Seth Dixon, Molly Diallo
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

The photographs of the salt flats in the Baja California Desert reveal dried out rivers that may have once fertilized the area to be able to sustain life.

Human-Environment Interaction speeds up desertification and makes once fertile lands useless.

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 3, 2013 6:52 PM

Describes drainage patterns in Baja California in Mexico.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:22 AM

This picture shows the drainage patterns and how the water drifted in many directions and not just in a single line. Water does not stay in a perfect straight line it flows and drifts in many directions. This is what the image is showing, how this particular water flows in many directions and branches off from one stream to another. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 7:46 AM

The Earth is an incredible place, we all know that. To see something like this form by itself is a wonder on its own.

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Cultural Patterns and Processes

Cultural Patterns and Processes | Geography | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


Via Seth Dixon, Molly Diallo
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

The immense tree of world religions is presented as a graphic to tell connections of world religions and how far they've broken and changed.

The movement of ideas and people have helped caused these breaks in the religion by bringing ideas to new people, mixing with the present culture, and going further from the hearth of the religion.

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Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 6, 8:57 AM

This shows the different branches of religions that people adhere to. This scoop was chosen to be the first on the page as a reference of each religion that mainly exists on Earth.

Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:32 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the origins of each religion. Also, it shows the various relationships between religions. 

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This shows how a lot of religions are interconnected, and even if people think two religions are completely different, they might have similar roots, just like languages.

 

Graham Shroyer's religion: This relates to key issue 1 because it shows where religions originated and how they are all connected, like judaism and christianity.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This is relevant to Key Issue # 1 because it identifies the origions and relationships of the major world religions of today. These religious branches clearly show the relationships between majorly and minorly practiced religions.


Rishi Suresh:  This shows how, similiar to languages, many religions come in families and have distinct connections between them. 

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:42 AM

fascinating infographic on world religions.

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Nature and Perspectives of Geography

Nature and Perspectives of Geography | Geography | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


Via Seth Dixon, Molly Diallo
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

more...
Marian Royal Vigil's comment, September 20, 2013 7:17 AM
Yes, Tom! I think so, too. It could probably be used as a companion piece to other types of maps and infographics as well.
Tom cockburn's comment, September 20, 2013 2:09 PM
Absolutely agree,Marian!
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 2:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

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Nature and Perspectives of Geography

Nature and Perspectives of Geography | Geography | Scoop.it

"MAPS: Here's the Most Popular Baby Name in Each State. By Business Insider. |. Posted Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, at 2:15 PM."


Via Seth Dixon, Molly Diallo
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

This chloropleth map shows the most popular female baby names of 2012 by state and can also reveal regional connections and the movement of common ideals. 

While the major regions of similarity (Mid-West and West Coast) of course are similar and show cultural connections, other states outside of these regions (yet have the same baby name) show connections that could have come from the movement of people and ideas from the other regions.

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 30, 2013 8:05 AM

Very interesting way to look at which names have become popular and where. I never would have guessed that there would be such a difference between the north and south, the east and west, or the more populated states versus the larger in land. I guess place and space even effect how names are picked. It would be interesting to see the map for previous years and compare. I would also be curious to see the map of the year I was born. 

Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 2:53 PM

Population..... all the babies being born...... popular girls' names!

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 2:11 PM

There are so many options when it comes to naming your son or daughter. As years go by, trends can be seen in the naming process according to regions. Names that were popular in the early 90s are less popular as names such as Olivia, Ava, Liam and Mason begin to become the most popularist. 

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Industrialization and Economic Development

Industrialization and Economic Development | Geography | Scoop.it
The federal minimum wage doesn't cover fair market rent anywhere in the United States.

Via Matt Richardson
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

Minimum wage has a hard time keeping decent living for even single people in the US, especially in economic hub areas.

Though this map shows issues in our political involvement in the economy, it also reveals economic hubs and their location in the US mainly along the coast.

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Matt Richardson's curator insight, April 23, 4:30 AM

Where can *you* afford to live?

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City and Urban Land Use

A layout of parcel 1 phase of Kabul New City as designed for IHFD
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

The designs of Kabul New City in Afghanistan are animated to give a clearer and better visual to how the development should look like.

The functional importance of Kabul New City as a region seems well enough to be a concern for the government to make animated plans to make sure the city is planned out correctly, taking into account functionality and aesthetic appeal. 

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Industrialization and Economic Development

Industrialization and Economic Development | Geography | Scoop.it
allAfrica: African news and information for a global audience
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

In Harare, Zimbabwe, illegal businesses are capitalizing on the water restrictions by selling water directly to the people. Harare lacks money to chemically treat their water so they had to put on these restrictions that are allowing these illegal business to grow. Compared to the U.S., where we have our own water businesses (like Nestle and Ozarka), we can draw the differences that in Harare, these businesses are growing out of need, while in the U.S., they are growing out of apathy and convenience.

The place of Harare, Zimbabwe (with poor water resources) allows these businesses to develop and grow and the need of the people for cleaner water keeps the businesses growing and introduces new competition and jobs.

more...
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, September 5, 2013 4:24 AM

In Harare, Zimbabwe, illegal businesses are capitalizing on the water restrictions by selling water directly to the people. Harare lacks money to chemically treat their water so they had to put on these restrictions that are allowing these illegal business to grow. Compared to the U.S., where we have our own water businesses (like Nestle and Ozarka), we can draw the differences that in Harare, these businesses are growing out of need, while in the U.S., they are growing out of apathy and convenience. 

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Cultural Patterns and Processes

Cultural Patterns and Processes | Geography | Scoop.it
Migrant escape routes in focus as thousands risk their lives to flee war, unrest and poverty and reach distant shores.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

Refugees from the Middle East and Afghanistan escape towards Indonesia and Australia as African Refugees head across the Mediterranean towards Europe (especially Italy and Malta). Due to Civil wars, violence, political instability, and poverty, these people are choosing to flee their country in hopes of a new, better life. 

The movement of refugees introduces many immigration problems and reforms into countries receiving these immigrants. The interaction of cultures also forces assimilation, cultural appropriation, and mixing.

more...
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, October 29, 2013 8:59 AM

Refugees from the Middle East and Afghanistan escape towards Indonesia and Australia as African Refugees head across the Meditterranean towards Europe (especially Italy and Malta). Due to Civil wars, violence, political instability, and poverty, these people are choosing to flee their country in hopes of a new, better life. 

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The Future of Agriculture May Be Up

The Future of Agriculture May Be Up | Geography | Scoop.it

Want to see where your food might come from in the future? Look up.

 

The seeds of an agricultural revolution are taking root in cities around the world—a movement that boosters say will change the way that urbanites get their produce and solve some of the world's biggest environmental problems along the way.

 

It's called vertical farming, and it's based on one simple principle: Instead of trucking food from farms into cities, grow it as close to home as possible—in urban greenhouses that stretch upward instead of sprawling outward.


Via David Rowing
more...
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 28, 9:00 PM

New forms of agriculture and a growing consumerism of local produce hindered by a lack of space have started a new movement towards vertical farming that allows urban areas to grow local produce close to consumer hubs.

Vertical farming could be considered Human/Environment Interaction as we bring the needed elements of an environment into our urban realms to capture the wants in our lives.

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Describes the Characteristics of an Ecosystem on Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

The SOuthern Brazilian Campos have high levels of biodiversity. The paper analyzes the current (2007) and past vegetation and climate history of the Campos.

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Includes a description of a place written in vivid language

Includes a description of a place written in vivid language | Geography | Scoop.it

"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.  We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location."


Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

National Geography reveals very different places to us with the use of photography. While each picture does have a desciption of the place, the visual aid reveals more.

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elianna sosa paulino's curator insight, September 10, 2013 7:27 AM

I think that is a manigficient photo i can't believe that these phoos nev been published and also missing their original location.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, September 10, 2013 7:31 AM

These pictures are awesome. It would be nice to know the locations of some of the pictures to compare them to images now.

 

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:05 AM

this is amazing!

Rescooped by Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena from Geography Education
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Map to Communicate Information (Mormon Population)

Map to Communicate Information (Mormon Population) | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's insight:

This map conveys the population of Mormons in each state. The sizes of the states are presented as corresponding the the Mormon population in each. The map links to more than what it shows. When you ask why are so many Mormons in Utah you can look into the past of Utah and the past of Mormons and you will find that Mormons settled in Utah following one of their leaders. You can then even ask the question why are Mormons still migrating to Utah or the question why did they stay there. Human geography can help us find the answers to these questions. A shared ideaology among the community. A lack of repurcussion for being open about their belief. A sense of belonging. Family connections. Human Geography help us unravel these mysteries which were brought to our attention by a simple map.

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Jacob Ramsey's comment, September 1, 2013 7:42 PM
Its really interesting how a so many people can collaborate on one topic to bring not only the history of a ideal, but the true history of a long line of people that were a big part of the development of the west in the United States. We always learn about how this and that president did something to help the country expand but it would very interesting to see how we as a country grew from the influences of someone outside of our own society. And not only does this book offer maps but it also includes charts and timelines!
Kendall Belleville's comment, September 2, 2013 2:11 PM
It is really cool to see how much of tho religions are in the United States. it is really nice to see that people are being supportive of them. It is interesting that there are large areas of religion and then some areas have very little.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 28, 9:30 PM

This map conveys the population of Mormons in each state. The sizes of the states are presented as corresponding the the Mormon population in each. The map links to more than what it shows. When you ask why are so many Mormons in Utah you can look into the past of Utah and the past of Mormons and you will find that Mormons settled in Utah following one of their leaders. You can then even ask the question why are Mormons still migrating to Utah or the question why did they stay there. Human geography can help us find the answers to these questions. A shared ideology among the community. A lack of repercussion for being open about their belief. A sense of belonging. Family connections. Human Geography help us unravel these mysteries which were brought to our attention by a simple map.

Regional spaces of Mormon's (such as the rather Formal region of Utah) are shown through the map and show the distribution of Mormonism throughout the world.