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How the Canadian Provinces and Territories Got Their Names

How the Canadian Provinces and Territories Got Their Names | Geography | Scoop.it
Here's a little more Canadian history on this Canada Day.    

Via AP US History, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks, Seth Dixon
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Toponyms

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:20 AM

I'm a little late for Canada Day, but the information about the origins of the names of all the Provinces and Territories is great information any time of year. 


Tags: Canada, toponyms, historical, trivia.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:42 AM

Like Seth said - a little late for Canada Day, but we can certainly use in our World Geography  unit on North America.   

 

English Gallery's curator insight, July 17, 2013 9:04 AM

Great for a little extra look at toponyms

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LiveLeak.com - Map of Europe: 1000 AD to present day

Look at all those changes over the time
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40 maps that explain the world

40 maps that explain the world | Geography | Scoop.it
Visualizing everything from the spread of religion to the most racially tolerant countries to the world's writing systems.
Sara Kanewske's insight:

40 maps

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Man Who Visited Every Country in the World Sums Up Trip in 4 Minutes

Man Who Visited Every Country in the World Sums Up Trip in 4 Minutes | Geography | Scoop.it
In November 2012, Liverpool resident Graham Hughes successfully became the first person to ever visit all United Nations member states without flying.
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Every country

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Why Are the Emerging Markets Slowing Down?

Why Are the Emerging Markets Slowing Down? | Geography | Scoop.it
During the last few years, a lot of hype has been heaped on the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa).
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Economics, BRICS

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American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes

American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes | Geography | Scoop.it
Every year, close to 40 million Americans move from one home to another. This interactive map visualizes those moves for every county in the country.
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Migration

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Secrets of Plant Genomes Revealed! - Cotton, Building a Better Plant

Cotton has been used by humans for millenia for clothing and hundreds, if not thousands, of other uses. Now scientists are examining cotton genomes to try to...
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Agriculture

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The Mysterious, Mutant, Civilizing Power of Milk

The Mysterious, Mutant, Civilizing Power of Milk | Geography | Scoop.it
To repurpose a handy metaphor, let's call two of the first Homo sapiens Adam and Eve. By the time they welcomed their firstborn, that rascal Cain, into the world, 2 million centuries of evolution had established how his infancy would play out.
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Diffusion

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Slavery Footprint

Slavery Footprint | Geography | Scoop.it
How many slaves work for you? There are 27 million slaves in the world today. Many of them contribute to the supply chains that end up in the products we use every day. Find out how many slaves work for you, and take action.
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Development

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United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), also called the Law of the Sea Convention or the Law of the Sea treaty, is the international agreement that resulted from the third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS III), which took place between 1973 and 1982. The Law of the Sea Convention defines the rights and responsibilities of nations in their use of the world's oceans, establishing guidelines for businesses, the environment, and the management of marine natural resources. The Convention, concluded in 1982, replaced four 1958 treaties. UNCLOS came into force in 1994, a year after Guyana became the 60th nation to sign the treaty.[1] As of October 2012, 164 countries and the European Union have joined in the Convention. However, it is uncertain as to what extent the Convention codifies customary international law.

While the Secretary General of the United Nations receives instruments of ratification and accession and the UN provides support for meetings of states party to the Convention, the UN has no direct operational role in the implementation of the Convention. There is, however, a role played by organizations such as the International Maritime Organization, the International Whaling Commission, and the International Seabed Authority (the latter being established by the UN Convention).

The UNCLOS replaces the older and weaker 'freedom of the seas' concept, dating from the 17th century: national rights were limited to a specified belt of water extending from a nation's coastlines, usually three nautical miles, according to the 'cannon shot' rule developed by the Dutch jurist Cornelius van Bynkershoek. All waters beyond national boundaries were considered international waters: free to all nations, but belonging to none of them (the mare liberum principle promulgated by Grotius).

Sara Kanewske's insight:

UNCLOS

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The Meatrix

The Meatrix | Geography | Scoop.it
The Meatrix website offers information on the issues surrounding factory farming, as well as alternatives to conventionally-raised meat, poultry, dairy, and eggs.
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Agriculture

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Where the Hell is Matt? 2012

Put # and then your city and country/state in your comment so I know where you're from. #Seattle, Washington Download the video to your computer/tablet/phone...
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Fun

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Maps & Data - Geography - U.S. Census Bureau

Maps & Data - Geography - U.S. Census Bureau | Geography | Scoop.it
Reference and Thematic Maps, Geographic Reference Files, TIGER/Line Shapefiles, and other geographic data and map products
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Homeownership, Models

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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World | Geography | Scoop.it
  If you're a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this c...
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This Pulsing Earth : NPR

This Pulsing Earth : NPR | Geography | Scoop.it
Spring comes, then summer, fall and winter and if you are off the planet with a camera looking down at Earth, the seasons seem like breaths. Speed up the imagery, and the planet seems to pulse, like a living thing.
Sara Kanewske's insight:

breathing earth

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North Korea Instagram Videos Prove Hermit Kingdom Is Just As Depressing As You Thought

North Korea Instagram Videos Prove Hermit Kingdom Is Just As Depressing As You Thought | Geography | Scoop.it
If the North Korean propaganda machine is to be believed, the Hermit Kingdom is a rare oasis of beauty, Pyongyang a bustling metropolis, the North Korean people a bundle of energy and happiness and its leaders a source of strength and compassion.
Sara Kanewske's insight:

North Korea

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Watch The First 54 Seconds. That’s All I Ask. You’ll Be Hooked After That, I Swear.

Watch The First 54 Seconds. That’s All I Ask. You’ll Be Hooked After That, I Swear. | Geography | Scoop.it
How did they turn something once regarded as so gross into something so beautiful?
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Ghost Towns Of America

A look a Ghost Towns Across America. Post to Facebook :: http://on.fb.me/16cxMlF Tweet This :: http://bit.ly/16cxP0D (you can change the text) Download The...
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Urban

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Grocery Store Wars (2005)

Not long ago in a supermarket not so far away. Help fight the dark side of the farm. Rate the film, favorite the film, comment the film and subscribe to our ...
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Agriculture

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H-E-B To Vacate Fountain View Store To Build Store on Fountain View » Swamplot: Houston's Real Estate Landscape

H-E-B To Vacate Fountain View Store To Build Store on Fountain View » Swamplot: Houston's Real Estate Landscape | Geography | Scoop.it
Houston, Texas real estate development, home buying, landscape, and design
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Urban Food Deserts

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DNA Test for Ancestry from National Geographic | Genographic Project

DNA Test for Ancestry from National Geographic | Genographic Project | Geography | Scoop.it
Sara Kanewske's insight:

DNA, Diffusion

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Mother Heroine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mother Heroine (Russian: Мать-героиня) was an honorary title in the Soviet Union awarded for bearing and raising a large family. The state's intent was not only to honour such large families but also to increase financial assistance to pregnant women, mothers of large families and single mothers, and to promote an increased level of health in mother and child.[1]

The honorary title "Mother Heroine" was established on July 8, 1944 by Decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet.[1] Its statute, including multiple increases in available state pensions for these families or single mothers, was amended 15 times from its original establishment until the last amendment contained in Decree number 20 of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of May 7, 1986.

The honorary title "Mother Heroine" was awarded to mothers bearing and raising 10 or more children. The title was accompanied by the bestowal of the Order "Mother Heroine" and a certificate conferred by the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union. It was awarded upon the first birthday of the last child, provided that nine other children (natural or adopted) remained alive. Children who had perished under heroic, military or other respectful circumstances, including occupational diseases, were also counted. The award was created simultaneously with the Order of Maternal Glory (Russian: Орден "Материнская слава") and the Maternity Medal (Russian: Медаль материнства), intended for women with five to nine children.[1]

Sara Kanewske's insight:

Population

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It’s a Girl! Documentary Film – Official Website

It’s a Girl! Documentary Film – Official Website | Geography | Scoop.it
The “It’s a Girl” documentary film explores the question of why are 200 million girls missing? In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls.
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Development and Gender

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West Wing - Why are we changing maps?

From season 2 - episode 16 "Somebody's Going to Emergency, Somebody's Going to Jail" It's "Big Block of Cheese" Day, which means that Leo sends grumbling sta...
Sara Kanewske's insight:

Maps

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