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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | Geography | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

Via Seth Dixon
Mark Burgess's insight:

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 3:30 PM

Beautiful images that are a great reminder of the incredible diversity of landscapes and waterways on this fragile planet.

Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

ok's curator insight, September 23, 5:45 AM

esrdcfvtgbhyjnkmstgyb weiweeee

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Rescooped by Mark Burgess from Sustainability resources for the Australian Curriculum
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Unicef Urban Population Map

Unicef Urban Population Map | Geography | Scoop.it

An Urban World: UNICEF's new data visualization of urban population growth over the next 40 years.This graphic depicts countries and territories with 2050 urban populations exceeding 100,000. Circles are scaled in proportion to urban population size. Hover over a country to see how urban it is (percentage of people living in cities and towns) and the size of its urban population (in millions).


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National Geographic Thematic Maps Launch in New Google Tool

National Geographic Thematic Maps Launch in New Google Tool | Geography | Scoop.it
Google Maps Gallery brings classic National Geographic cartography online. (Google Maps brings classic cartography online: http://t.co/QeCv9at2cE)
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Earth's crust 4.4 billion years old

Earth's crust 4.4 billion years old | Geography | Scoop.it
Earth's crust first formed at least 4.4 billion years ago, just 160 million years after the formation of our solar system, a new study has found.
A time-line of the history of our planet places the formation of the Jack Hills zircon and a "cool
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Transportation and Planning

"When you combine a street and a road, you get a STROAD, one of the most dangerous and unproductive human environments. To get more for our transportation dollar, America needs an active policy of converting STROADs to productive streets or high capacity roadways."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 2:52 PM

In this video, a road provides high connectivity between places, and a street is a diverse platform of social interactions that create a place.  A 'stroad' can be likened unto a spork--it tries to do it everything but does nothing especially well.  While you may debate the principle being shown, this video (found on Atlantic Cities) is a good way to show the spatial thinking that city planners need to utilize to improve the urban environment. 


Tagstransportation, urban, planning.

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 5:03 AM

the danger of stroads

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 31, 2:19 PM

The Stroad - an unfortunate phenomenon... NYC is taking action to minimize its' STROADS... more cities should do the same.

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Geography | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

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Christophe CESETTI's curator insight, January 23, 5:37 PM

Pearltree "Géographie" http://pear.ly/cqIbP

Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

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Ghana cashew nut farmers struggle to profit from fruits of their labour | marketspace

Ghana cashew nut farmers struggle to profit from fruits of their labour | marketspace | Geography | Scoop.it
Cashew nuts have become a global industry, yet small-scale farmers in Ghana are battling to get a fair return for their work (#Ghana’s cashew nut farmers struggle to profit from fruits of their labour http://t.co/7pJ73h2LIS...
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Environment, Energy and Resilience

Indonesia has the largest share of the world's mangroves — coastal forests that have adapted to saltwater environments. They play important environmental and ecological roles.

 

Mangroves play a key role of acting as an ecological buffer in coastal region that provide the area with resilience against tsunamis, hurricanes and other forms of coastal flooding.  Their role in carbon sequestration is also vital as energy emissions globally continue to rise.  So let's jump scales: how are global issues locally important?  How is the local deeply global?  How can stakeholders at either scale find common ground with the other?  


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 8:34 PM

Indonesia is home to 1/4 of the worlds mangrove trees. These trees are salt tolerant and grow along the coastlines. They provide protection from tidal floods and erosion and provide homes for the islands biodiversity. The most important thing they do however is provide the villagers with wood  to make shrimp ponds and fire wood. They also protect the mangroves ecosystem. These trees are so very important to Indonesia, their economy and their life style. 

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 12:45 PM

Mangroves are a natural barrier to hurricanes, tsunamis, and the flooding that come with it in a very important way. It's often suggested that there is a battle between opposing sides of the environment and business, but in a situation like this, and in many others, the natural environment exists for a reason and protects the land against severe damage. In this way there's an economic incentive to protect natural environments as well as an ecological one.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 14, 7:35 AM

The NPR report discusses how valuable the mangrove forests of Indonesia are not just locally important, but globally important as well. Locally, they provide protection from flooding and tsunami as well as being incredibly significant in the overall ecology of the area. Globally, the mangroves are incredibly efficient at reducing carbon dioxide compared to most other types of forests. The Indonesian people have an interest in protecting the mangroves for their own local benefits, but there is interest internationally in the mangroves as buying and protecting them allows for a country to earn carbon credits. The dilemma lies in that clearing the mangroves for agriculture is a large economic advantage, but ruins the environmental benefits. A balance needs to be struck with the international community to protect the mangroves for the world while providing significant economic benefits to Indonesia.

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Incredible Shrinking Country

Incredible Shrinking Country | Geography | Scoop.it
There are “babyloids” and relatives-for-rent in an increasingly childless Japan.

 

While many parts of the world are concerned with population growth, Japan is struggling to find ways to slow down the demographic decline.  What economic and cultural forces are leading the the changing nature of Japanese demographics?  A video that explains the changing nature of modern Japanese relationships and gender norms can be accessed here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/30/japan-population-decline-youth-no-sex_n_1242014.html


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 7, 2012 12:52 AM
This article helps to see why population is declining so rapidly in Japan. There is not just one contributing factor, but many factors. There is a high suicide rate and low birth rate. Many single Japanese women decide not to have children, while countries such as the US, many single women choose to have children. Japan's high divorce rate will also cause decline in population. Al of these factors that contribute to the decline in Japan's population is hurting the economy. If the population does not start to increase, Japan will be further in trouble.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:30 PM


Japan in the future will have a great economy because there will be more people working than being retired collecting a monthly check. Which means they have more taxes coming in than being given out and they can use that extra money to help create better things for their society.  It also could mean they wont have so much of a deficit like the United States does.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:21 PM

Japan's shrinking population poses many challenges to the state, namely a shrinking work force. While Japan is a very developed country, it still needs people to continue its growth. Perhaps the government should subsidize families with more than one child? a la reverse One Child policy. As I'm sure Japan would not welcome an influx of Han Chinese.

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The Economics of Sustainability

http://www.ted.com Have we used up all our resources? Have we filled up all the livable space on Earth? Paul Gilding suggests we have, and the possibility of...

 

This provocatively title TED talk would be an excellent resource for discussing sustainable development.  What are the economic, environmental, political and cultural ramifications of suggested policies that seek to lead towards sustainable development?  What are the ramifications of not changing policies towards sustainable development?  


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:02 AM

 I found this video very interesting because it spoke about how there is so little space and more and more people are having kids. But there is no space because everyone likes having a lot of room to expand that is why because everyone in the world could fit in the state of California. So there is space it is just not spread out good enough that everyone could fit comfortably. 

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42 Amazing Maps

The map, as an innovation, is extremely important. Simply constructing a useful representation of our world onto a piece of paper (or clay or vellum or whate...

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Jyri-Pekka Kukkonen's curator insight, September 26, 2013 2:18 AM

mielenkiintoista...

jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 5:20 PM

if graphs are the language of economics , maps speak for geographers and they are also a great way to show econmic data

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2:13 PM

unit 1

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Breathingearth - CO2, birth & death rates by country, simulated real-time

Breathingearth - CO2, birth & death rates by country, simulated real-time | Geography | Scoop.it

A visual real-time simulation that displays the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, birth rates, and death rates of every country in the world.


Via Allison Anthony, Malmci@Spatialzone
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Allison Anthony's curator insight, September 26, 2013 9:23 AM

This is cool!  It shows births, deaths and amounts of CO2 emitted while you're watching the animation.  Incredible!

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Global Oil Reserves

Global Oil Reserves | Geography | Scoop.it

Who has the oil? http://pic.twitter.com/7Njc7OD8rw


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Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, March 13, 11:22 PM

Inequalities exist as well

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 26, 6:03 PM

This graph depcits Sauda Arabia with the most oil reserves in at 262 Billion barrels and in second place coming in at 132 billion barrels is Iran. These barrels are a very important assett to not only the US but to the world. This is why gas is so expensive because most of the time the US has to import it from differnt countries in order to obtain the amount we need for resources and mostly everything is based on oil as far as some fossil fuels are concerned. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 5:22 PM

India is demonstrated at 2,000-2,999 in range of bbps. This amount of oil reserves is very important to the revenue of the country and the way that the poeple survive, natural resources such as oil are a very important and costly resource to obtain. Having oil in your country helps with trade and revenue income and trade routes are compiled which helps the economy.

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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | Geography | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

Via Seth Dixon
Mark Burgess's insight:

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 3:30 PM

Beautiful images that are a great reminder of the incredible diversity of landscapes and waterways on this fragile planet.

Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

ok's curator insight, September 23, 5:45 AM

esrdcfvtgbhyjnkmstgyb weiweeee

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Kiev's battle zone: interactive before and after photos

Kiev's battle zone: interactive before and after photos | Geography | Scoop.it
Explore our interactive before and after photos to see how protests have turned central Kiev into a battle zone.
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Faults in Xinjiang : Image of the Day

Faults in Xinjiang : Image of the Day | Geography | Scoop.it
Colliding continents and cracks in the Earth’s crust make for some remarkable scenery in western China.

 

Just south of the Tien Shan mountains, in northwestern Xinjiang province, a remarkable series of ridges dominate the landscape. The highest hills rise up to 1,200 meters (3,900 feet) above the adjacent basins, and they are decorated with distinctive red, green, and cream-colored sedimentary rock layers. The colors reflect rocks that formed at different times and in different environments.  When land masses collide, the pressure can create what geologists call “fold and thrust belts.” Slabs of sedimentary rock that were laid down horizontally can be squeezed into wavy anticlines and synclines. 

The ridge is noticeably offset by a strike-slip or “tear” fault in the image showing the Piqiang Fault, a northwest trending strike-slip fault that runs roughly perpendicular to the thrust faults for more than 70 kilometers (40 miles). The colored sedimentary rock layers are offset by about 3 kilometers (2 miles) in this area.


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Mathijs Booden's comment, February 8, 2:40 PM
Dit hoeft geen strike-slip te zijn. Het zijn hellende lagen, dus de breuk kan ook een op- of afschuiving zijn.
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Santas Around the World

Santas Around the World | Geography | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.

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Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 8:10 PM
This was definitely an interesting reading. I believe @Spencer Levesque had a very good point. They all have similar features, but are different in little ways. And who would of thought someone came on New Years too?
Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 10:23 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries precieve Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country perceives him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 10:28 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries perceive Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country precieves him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

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Planting Rice

Thailand...

Feel free to mute the commentary...this video demonstrates the truly 'back-breaking' work that is a part of paddy rice farming. 


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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:20 AM
this video of Thailand shows just how different life styles are throughout the world. Americans for instance wouldn't be found dead doing this type of labor work. that goes to show just how shallow americans are and how incredible these people are for doing labor of this nature. planting rice is not only a life style they pick to do it is a life style they must do. with rice being Thailand's prime export and an ideal location for rice paddys this "job" isn't actually a job its a must do. these women spend hundreds of hours a week doing this.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:11 PM

When you look at Thailand from satellite imagery, it looks as though much of the country has a tannish color which you would think is dry and has less vegetation compared to neighboring countries.  The country actual has quite a bit of rainfall, and the suspect for all the dry-looking areas is farming fields for things such as rice.  This is serious manual labor with constant bending and speedy methods.  Though in a culture, and broader surrounding region that uses rice so frequently in their meals, having these type of farms is necessary to everyday life.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:03 PM

Just watching them work makes my back hurt. I feel terribel for them, but it is their job. I wonder if there are any machines or tools that they can use to get their job done more uickly and easier. Agriculture started off just like this. It was only people planting and doing all the work, but now in there are machines used for this new generation of agriculture. It's just sad that many countries still can't afford all these tools or machines. So unfortunately, people do have to physically hurt themselves or go through some sort of pain just to get things done. But this video makes me appreicate more where my food is coming from, because the foods that I buy does come from all over the world.

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7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast?

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial distinctions (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings at different scales). 


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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 9:44 AM

This video shows how the populations of each country  are  increasing and decreasing in a very unique way. It explains how the populations are increasing and decreasing as the years go on.  It also shows that the death rates and the birth rates are  being combined to make the true populations as accurate as possible.

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 9:13 PM

This video is good at helping people better visualize population because you can easily see the difference of each continent. It shows how the population started small and rapidly expanded because of the agricultural and industrial revolution and decrease in deaths making it and the births unstablized. It even goes on to talk about the future population and how it is believed that the population won't continue to grow rapidly but once again stabalize.

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of...

 

This video is a great primer for discussing human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change. 


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Human activity altering rainfall patterns, satellite data shows

Human activity altering rainfall patterns, satellite data shows | Geography | Scoop.it
Human activities are altering rainfall patterns across the global, a world first study using satellite data has found.
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The Map That Puts China's Incredible Internet Demographics in Context

The Map That Puts China's Incredible Internet Demographics in Context | Geography | Scoop.it
More people in the country go online than in all of Africa—but the percentage of the population who uses the Internet is still small.

Via Allison Anthony, Malmci@Spatialzone
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