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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


Via Seth Dixon
Matt Davidson's insight:

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

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Helen Rowling's curator insight, September 28, 2014 6:30 PM

Use updates to filter through and be collated in your most frequented tools.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

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What China Has Been Building in the South China Sea

What China Has Been Building in the South China Sea | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
China has been feverishly piling sand onto reefs in the South China Sea for the past year, creating seven new islets in the region. It is straining geopolitical tensions that were already taut.

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Ben Salve's curator insight, August 8, 9:17 AM

Last year this was an intriguing story but now the geopolitical drama is growing as more countries are literally building islands out of reef outcroppings to strengthen their claims to the South China Sea.  This is the most comprehensive article that I've seen on the escalating situation.   


Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, East Asia.

Clairelouise's curator insight, August 8, 9:25 AM

Last year this was an intriguing story but now the geopolitical drama is growing as more countries are literally building islands out of reef outcroppings to strengthen their claims to the South China Sea.  This is the most comprehensive article that I've seen on the escalating situation.   


Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, East Asia.

Asie(s)'s curator insight, August 26, 10:41 AM

Good piece. Must read!

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How Maps Are Saving the World

How Maps Are Saving the World | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
Maps. They’ve been around longer than photographs. They’ve defined empires,guided explorers, told stories, and captured the imagination of many a hopeful traveler for years. While most appreciate the beauty and power of a good map, few recognize the dynamic and vital applications they have today.

 

Tags:  mapping, 201, edtech, cartography.


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27 Facts About Maps

A weekly show where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John shares 27 facts about maps.

Via Seth Dixon
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Maps are awesome - need I say more! This clip actually covers a significant amount on the power / influence of maps through history.

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Karen Kesby's curator insight, August 10, 7:39 PM

This Mental Floss video is an entertaining rapid-fire hodgepodge of map trivia with some important educational content nicely nestled in there.  This 99 Percent Invisible podcast is another 'ode to maps,' but this one is more poetic about the value of cartography and personal in how it explores the qualities they possess.  Enjoy them both!  

Tags:  mapping, trivia, cartography.

Ashley Burleson's curator insight, August 11, 4:45 AM

This Mental Floss video is an entertaining rapid-fire hodgepodge of map trivia with some important educational content nicely nestled in there.  This 99 Percent Invisible podcast is another 'ode to maps,' but this one is more poetic about the value of cartography and personal in how it explores the qualities they possess.  Enjoy them both!  

Tags:  mapping, trivia, cartography.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 11, 7:59 PM

Very USA centric but entertaining and makes you think about the taken-for- granted use of maps. We do believe them!!

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Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World

Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
Eating at the school cafeteria could've been amazing if you grew up almost anywhere but the U.S.

 

Tags: agriculture, food distribution. 


Via Seth Dixon
Matt Davidson's insight:

Food for thought! Could generate some great discussion around the value of eating local produce - even an investigation of what conditions foster such a variety of foods in different places

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Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2:37 AM

I really thought I should share this article that shows the different food lunches across the world. It reflects on the country and its economy. I believe we should change our lunches to make them more healthy as the other countries. We should add more fruits and take out the cookies. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 5:53 PM

This is a really cool article! I always enjoy looking at food from around the world, so I automatically scooped this when I saw it. This is a article with a slideshow of school lunches around the world. At the very end of the photo slide, there is a photo of an American school lunch which is pretty embarrassing compared to Brazil and Finland. This photo series was taken by SweetGreens, and the school lunches were put together to represent an average school lunch, not necessarily what they have every day. 

They talk about how each country eats what is grown around them, while US is processed food like chicken nuggets and chocolate chip cookie.

I really want to move to Brazil and eat their school lunch, haha! It looks so good. For dessert in Finland, they have a berry crepe on their plate! That's awesome! If you have some free time, then be sure to check this out! 

5) Interdependence among regions of food production and consumption

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 6:46 PM

Summary: This article showed a series of pictures, which showed traditional school lunches of different countries. Greece's lunch included a Mediterranean diet, while Brazil's had rice and beans with greens, and the United States had its classic chicken nuggets, chocolate chip cookie, and mashed potatoes. The goal of this article was definitely to show what foods were incorporated into different cultures and climates.

 

Insight: Food is one example of a cultural trait, and quite a prominent one. Tradition may prohibit or encourage eating a certain kind of food, while long term climate also makes a large difference on the crops traditional grown in a country. 

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China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity

China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
Several hundred million more people are expected to move to cities in East Asia over the next 20 years as economies shift from agriculture to manufacturing and services, according to a World Bank report

Via Seth Dixon, dilaycock
Matt Davidson's insight:

Great article for year 8 - urbanisation

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Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:46 PM

Summary: This article talks about population density in the Chinese pearl river delta. It compares population density to other places as well as talking about how factors like urbanization effect population density.

 

Insight: This article is significant because it shows that even today physical geography can lead to urbanization and still effect population density.  

 

 

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2:16 PM

Tokyo has been overtaken as the world’s largest megacity by China’s Pearl River Delta. The Megacity, Pearl River Delta, covers most of China’s manufacturing hotspots including cities of Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Foshan and Dongguan. This megacity now houses more people than in Canada, Argentina, or Australia. Over the next 20 years several million more people are expected to move to these East Asian Cities. The kind of urbanization that took place in Europe and Americas are starting to develop in East Asia. East Asia already contains 8 megacities and 123 cities with a population between 1-10 million people.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 12:39 PM

APHG- HW Option 7

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100 Years of National Geographic Maps

100 Years of National Geographic Maps | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
Since 1915, National Geographic cartographers have charted earth, seas, and skies in maps capable of evoking dreams.

Via Seth Dixon
Matt Davidson's insight:

Beautiful article on an amazing organisation - the history of maps and map-making tells us so much about how people have viewed the world through history - great for year 7.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 4, 12:47 PM

Maps chart places, but the very act of making them can also reshape how we think about places and alter history.


Tags: historicalmapping, National Geographic.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 5, 12:35 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2:32 AM

All I can say is: WOW. I loved looking at the maps in this picture. When I think of maps, I usually just think about a plain old mercator projection of the world. However, this article has reminded me of how special each and every map it. Each map is made by a group of people who put in a lot of time and effort to giving the public the best information. I would have never thought of mapmaking as reaching as deep at the Atlantic ridges and reaching as high as the moon. It is simply amazing how much these mapmaker must understand of the world and even to some extent the Universe to make these maps. Maps are simply amazing. However, this does remind me of the article I read about how HarperCollins omitted Israel from the maps in the Middle East. It just shows that our perceptions of maps as objective things just are not that true. Maps do show favoritism and may leave out certain countries or territories that the group of people who made the map do not like or do not recognize.

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Casa Incubo shipping container house is called an "icon of sustainability."

Casa Incubo shipping container house is called an "icon of sustainability." | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
This container home in Costa Rica is almost a monster home, but has some interesting features.

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See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas

See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it

A wonder"

Earth is changing rapidly, and an increasing number of scientists say that humans have become the dominant force driving these changes. While the term has no formal definition, many agree that we are now living in an age shaped by human activity: the Anthropocene.

Evidence for the Anthropocene ranges from worldwide population booms to the expansive transformation of the landscape. But solutions are cropping up at the local level that could help create a more resilient global community." 

 

Tags: ESRI, anthropocene, environment depend, sustainability. 


Via Seth Dixon
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A wonderful resource, e.g. for year 10 - environmental change and management

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Olga Boldina's curator insight, December 3, 2014 3:25 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Truthbehere2's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:01 AM

Well duh...we are very greedy leeches that don't want to take the time to restore and repair what we take and destroy...

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, December 8, 2014 10:58 AM

Excellent use of an Esri Storymap to outline how humans have changed Earth over time.

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Rooftop Farming Is Getting Off The Ground

Rooftop Farming Is Getting Off The Ground | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
Urban farmers are eyeing rooftops that are already green as potential sites to grow food. But there are big obstacles to rooftop farming — from permitting to transporting water and soil to the top of a building.
Matt Davidson's insight:

A nice little case study for year 9 course on food security. See also http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/11/12/363580928/40-percent-of-the-worlds-cropland-is-in-or-near-cities

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BBC Africa with David Attenborough - EP04/06 - Cape

Cape Southern Africa is a riot of life and colour because of two great ocean currents that sweep around the continent's Cape. To the east, the warm Agulhas current generates clouds that roll inland to the wettest place in southern Africa. To the west is the cold Benguela current, home to more great white sharks than anywhere else. Moisture laden fog rolls inland, supporting an incredible desert garden. Where the two currents meet, the clash of warm and cold water creates one of the world's most fabulous natural spectacles - South Africa's sardine run. This is the greatest gathering of predators on the planet, including Africa's largest, the Bryde's whale.
Matt Davidson's insight:

A nice way to introduce landscapes in year 8 is to show some footage of contrasting and spectacular examples. Like so many David Attenborough docos, this program does just that. The first 2 minutes and from approx. 22.30 to 24.30 show striking contrasts of landscapes that are influenced by the ocean currents and climate systems. Another nice example - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQ_IQS3VKjA

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India's Potty Problem

India's Potty Problem | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it

Which statement is true? 

 

A. 60% of all households without toilets in the world are in India.
B. India’s Muslims are less affected by the sanitation problem than Hindus.
C. India’s lack of toilets is worse than China’s.
D. Lack of toilets in India puts women at especially high risk.


Via Seth Dixon
Matt Davidson's insight:

a nice article for year 7 (water) and 10 (global wellbeing)

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Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, April 19, 7:41 PM

Excellent article for sparking discussion on the costs of development.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:37 PM

Unfathomable to see that all of these are true, but at the same time not unbelievable.  I can see sanitation problems being relevant wherever there is overpopulation in the world.  Especially here where Muslims are defecating outside as a part of ritual, you wonder if they would use toilets even if they had them.  India is lucky they don't have some disease running ram,pant that can kill large portions of their population in a hurry like the plague in England.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 10:48 AM

In America, this story is not fathomable.  The sanitation problem in India goes beyond cultural norms, in my opinion.  I think it is evident of an infrastructure that is way behind the country's socioeconomic level of growth.  It seems like finally, after electing a new prime minister, that there will be much focus brought on the issue.  It also seems that if they don't shore up this sanitation issue that they will have a bigger epidemic on their hands, as there have been recent murders and rapes of young women in these sanitation fields.

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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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I'm lovin it

This is a great website for year 9, looking at both food and global interconnections

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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30 Striking Satellite Images That Will Change The Way You See The Earth

30 Striking Satellite Images That Will Change The Way You See The Earth | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
Satellite imagery can be put to many good uses, from military and meteorology, to biology and geological.

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Wonderful satellite images

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Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach

Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
This website serves as an off-campus host for text, images, data and other web-based resources associated with the free eText, Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 4:58 PM

I'm very excited to see a free eText in Human Geography.  I will be looking at this more closely during the next semester and think that geography teachers will see this as a welcome supplemental to their arsenal of resources. This is definitely on the shortlist of best materials on this site.   


Tags: geography educationAPHG, textbook.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, August 13, 7:24 AM

Human Geography

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 13, 8:52 AM

Gracias a Seth Dixon accedo a este texto de acceso libre que es una interesante Introducción a la Geografía Humana. De fácil navegación se puede acceder a valiosa información textual, a imágenes, datos y otros recursos. Es un producto de Steven Graves, profesor de geografía en California State University, Northridge.

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Isis slave markets sell girls for 'as little as a pack of cigarettes', UN envoy says

Isis slave markets sell girls for 'as little as a pack of cigarettes', UN envoy says | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
UN envoy on sexual violence says abducting girls has become a key part of Isis strategy to recruit foreign fighters in Iraq and Syria over the past 18 months
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Human Rights for year 10

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THE WORLD GEOGRAPHY: Unusual Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses

THE WORLD GEOGRAPHY: Unusual Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
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Amazing wildlife bridges - you couldn't get a better representation of the interconnection of the human and natural worlds, and people's attempts to meet both ecological and their own needs

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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
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A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

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Interactive - Sustainable development goals: changing the world in 17 steps

Interactive - Sustainable development goals: changing the world in 17 steps | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it

The MDGs expire this year and the SDGs begin. But what are the SDGs all about?


Via Mathijs Booden
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The UN's new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - year 10 Global Wellbeing

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Can Chinese billionaire Wang Jing overcome fierce opposition to build a canal across Nicaragua?

Can Chinese billionaire Wang Jing overcome fierce opposition to build a canal across Nicaragua? | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
One of the largest engineering projects in history would start here, on this desolate and pristine crescent of dark-sand Pacific beach.

Via Andy Dorn
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Fascinating project that is applicable to year 9 (interconnections) and year 10 (environmental change)

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Wake Up Call - YouTube


Wake Up Call takes us on a fast-paced, animated glimpse of the true costs behind some of our most prized possessions - our electronic gadgets. Joining the dots between the stages of extraction, production, consumption and disposal, it reveals that, although our gadgets appear sleek and shiny, their appearance is misleading.


Via Andy Dorn
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An interesting, provocative and thoughtful way to introduce geographies of interconnections at year 9

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Artificial vs Natural Watermelon & Sweetcorn

Artificial vs Natural Watermelon & Sweetcorn | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
Inspired by the recent Peach infographic, I set out to find the least natural fruit in existence, and decided it was probably the modern watermelon. Take a look below: which one would you rather ea...
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Great link between food and globalisation - year 9 course

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Around the World in 360° Degrees - 3 Year Epic Selfie - YouTube

600 Days Around the World with a GoPro on a stick! In the most epic selfie ever! The ultimate selfie compilation documented like never before in a 360° Degre...
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A really nice way to start a unit on tourism - just a great clip

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Visualizing How a Population Reaches 7 Billion

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy…
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My students love this video - I always show it when studying world population changes. Could link in with year 8, 9 or 10. Also see http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/05/07/map-more-than-half-of-humanity-lives-within-this-circle/

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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon
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Fabulous presentation on changing population demographics and the power of population pyramids

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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:08 PM

Spectacular changes in global demographics, a bit scaring to be honest

Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 10:47 AM

unit 2

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My top 10 geography sites for teaching in Australia

My top 10 geography sites for teaching in Australia | Geography education in Australia | Scoop.it
Matt Davidson's insight:

1. Scoop.it

If you aren’t using scoop.it to follow Geography topics, then make sure you start – a resource bank and ideas sharing site like no other – and Geography is dominating. Even for non-social media people, an easy site to navigate and become engrossed in. Make sure you follow Seth Dixon.

Of course, many would consider Twitter here as the primary social networking site, but I think for Geography the format of scoop.it makes it potentially even more useful. Also, not convinced students are using Twitter even with its global popularity.

 

2. Youtube

What could be more useful to a subject that is so visual and investigates so many case studies / locational contexts than the king of video resources? Almost does away with the need for DVDs (except for the gems like Tropic of Cancer, Andrew Marr’s Megacities, How Earth Made Us… a separate list needed).

 

3. Google Earth / maps

You cannot teach Geography today without this on your top sites list, even if your students only use it to look up their own houses in street view. I don’t use it all that often, but useful for investigating distribution patterns of topics like urbanisation, land use changes, etc. Also such an amazing example of the power of technology in today’s world.

 

4. Gapminder

If you teach social Geography and have never looked at Gapminder, do so right now. Immerse yourself in this amazing site with interactive graphs, videos, teaching resources, etc. Hans Rosling makes stats exciting!

 

5. ABC Splash

Resources are being added all the time – a great spot for subject-specific videos, games etc. for almost any Geography topic.

 

6. National Geographic + NG education

What could be more Geographical? So relevant, contemporary and informative.

 

7. BBC, including BBCbitesize

Like NG, such a recognisable and definitive resource.

 

8. Traveller IQ (also, Speed Geo app for iPad) or other good Geog online game sites

Students love traveller IQ and think they are having free time when they are actually learning Geography. Also a nice chance for some to show off their knowledge.

 

9. Map sites such as Worldmapper, 40 maps that explain the world (the Washington post), etc. It’s so important to show students that maps are interesting, relevant and powerful sources of data.

 

10. Stats sites – e.g. CIA world factbook, UN, factmonster, UN cyberschoolbus, ABS, PRB (Population Reference Bureau), etc.Great sites for assignments and teaching the importance of stats – e.g. some fascinating population stats and visuals at PRB.

 

Other helpful sites – Geogspace (AGTA site), newspaper sites – especially the Guardian, GEP (Global education project), pinterest, subject association sites such as the GTAV, d-maps (or other blank map sites), Asia education foundation, creative sites like incredibox, studentguide.org ……

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