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Why We Travel...

Why We Travel... | Geography | Scoop.it

So go 'read' some more (Extra credit for identifying the location)!


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Kendall Dickson's comment, September 11, 2012 9:21 PM
St. Augustine hit this saying out of the ball park. Sometimes when I try taking picutres of the sky or of a scene, I will delete the picture because it just isnt the same as in realy life. I really think that traveling gives people a reality shock when seeing new phenomena.
Lydia Blevins's comment, September 12, 2012 10:14 PM
What i think this quote means is that you may think you know a lot about the world but until you go and travel to different places you will not fully understand the world. I also think it means that there is so many different things to experience on earth.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 3, 2015 11:09 AM

For the wanderlust in all of us. 


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What is GIS Lecture - GT-101 - Washington College

"This lecture will discuss each part of the Geographic Information System. It is part of our GT-101 workshop."

More information on our workshops can be found at http://gis.washcoll.edu and http://geoworkshops.org


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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

Altaira Wallquist's curator insight, March 18, 2015 4:47 PM

This article goes in depth to define and describe globalization.  It discusses globalization  through an economical, political, and cultural standpoint.

 

This connects to Unit 1 in that it discusses globalization and things from a global perspective. It all discusses the society we live in today.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:18 PM

globalization

This video describes and really breaks down globalization. The video talks about how some countries benefit and some countries don't benefit from globalization. The video also separates globalization into three parts: economic, politics, and culture. It goes over the huge role that technology plays in globalization and covers it well.

This relates to our unit, because globalization is a huge factor in human geography as a whole. It is one of the main factors why our cultures are beginning to intertwine and have things in common.     

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Problem-Based Learning with GIS

Problem-Based Learning with GIS | Geography | Scoop.it

In the Mid-Morning Plenary Session of the ESRI User Conference, it was apparent that students can learn in meaningful ways by applying GIS to real-world situations. 

 

Tags: GIS, edtech, GeographyEducation.


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OverlapMaps - Instantly compare any two places on Earth!

OverlapMaps - Instantly compare any two places on Earth! | Geography | Scoop.it
An OverlapMap is a map of one part of the world that overlaps a different part of the world. OverlapMaps show relative size.

 

This is an very simple way to demonstrate the true size of places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.  


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Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:07 PM
This toll will and can provide a reliable mapping source to geographers everywhere. It is useful and fun. A neat way to learn cartography
Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 11:31 PM
The OverlapMap is a very useful tool that will allow a user to compare different places and parts of the world. Having a more accurate size of a place is critical when comparing 2 or more places. I think that many users besides me will find this very convenient when other resources are not available.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 11:48 PM

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is a very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper. 

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Gerrymandering: What is it?

Gerrymandering: What is it? | Geography | Scoop.it

This page is a quick primer for understanding how the decennial census leads to the incredibly political process of reapportionment of the congressional districts.  It also defines the specific gerrymandering techniques of packing, cracking, hijacking and kidnapping as well as the historical origin of the term.


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Why should I be interested in Geography?

A video made by David Lambert et al showing why Geography is a key subject and the importance of understanding it in the context of our modern world.

 

This is a creative video that promotes geo-literacy.  It is an excellent way to kick off a new school year if you are looking for a 'hook' to demonstrate the importance of geography to students today.  Other materials of this nature can be found on this website under the tag 'geo-inspiration' which is accessible here: http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education?tag=geo-inspiration


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Lydia Blevins's comment, September 2, 2012 12:33 PM
I didn't realize how important geography is. It seems very fascinating to learn about geography and how it has so much to do with the future and how our world keeps changing. I can't wait to learn about it in class.
Haley Wayland's comment, September 3, 2012 12:24 AM
This video really gave me a better idea of what this class will teach me and give me more knowledge about. I never really understood the definition of geography and why it was so important. It really seems like an interesting class and I'm very interested.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:11 PM
This really shows the importance of geography and how much we have not payed attention to how much has changed
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"It's Not My Mountain Anymore"

"It's Not My Mountain Anymore" | Geography | Scoop.it

"First-hand accounts of profound experiences and mountain living in rural Appalachia."

 

This book touches on important themes.  In our rush to strengthen the economic vitality of our urban areas, what are the cultural and environmental impacts within rural areas?  This nostalgic look at a bygone era also exemplifies the concept of "place" as a geographic term, and the deep emotional attachments that it evokes in so many.


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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | Geography | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 2015 4:09 PM

When it comes to ethnic groups in the United States, many of the hispanic/mexican ancestors occur in the southwestern area of the United States. That's obviously because Mexico is southwest of the United States. When it comes to emigrating from Mexico, individuals immigrate to the United States (mostly southwest of the United States) so they can live a different, hopefully better economy. Plus, they try to escape the gang violence and drug violence in Mexico.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, April 3, 2015 1:46 PM

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration. 

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NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages

NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages | Geography | Scoop.it
New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world.

 

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Here is the article related to the video available. 


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 10:25 AM

This article and video were very interesting.  They point out how a city full of immigrants can help preserver a dying language.  The work being done to learn about and preserve these obscure languages is great.  The fact that in New York you will hear language spoken more there than in their home country is astounding to me and very interesting.  This fact is key to preserving these language as they are from areas of the world were the technology level is much lower and less likely to be preserved.  It is also interesting as it shows where people are coming from to live in NY.  The city draws immigrants like a sponge draws in water and this adds to the cultural mosaic that is NY city.

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2008 Election maps

2008 Election maps | Geography | Scoop.it

Excellent electoral geography maps from the U.S. presidential election of 2008.  What are the major patterns you see?  What do these patterns in say about the politics, culture and demographics about these places?


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America's Fertility Class Divide

America's Fertility Class Divide | Geography | Scoop.it
Since the average American woman has 2.1 children, you might think we aren't experiencing a national fertility crisis.

 

This article effectively conveys the global trend of lower fertility rates coinciding with higher rates of female education, wealth and development.  As a bonus, it shows that within a given country, fertility rates are not uniform, but vary between demographic classes. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 28, 2011 10:42 AM
My pleasure...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 2014 2:24 PM

In the article, Lerner details why the United States' healthy birthrate of 2.1 children per woman is a deceiving number. While other first world nations like England and Germany are suffering from overall low birthrates, the United States is suffering due to the low birthrates in high-income brackets and high birthrates in low- income brackets. This discrepancy is reinforced by a lack of paid leave laws for new parents in the US, making having a child a burden for potential parents with aims of furthering their careers. Similarly, lower income women do not have enough access to publicly funded family planning programs.

 

This dichotomy in birthrates in the US will likely have a negative effect on the nation's economy going further. If most of the nation's children are being born into poor families the next generation of Americans are more likely to have worse access to education and be unable to obtain higher paying jobs than if the birthrate were more uniform across income brackets.

Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 2015 7:48 PM

This article showed how when you average the birth rate in the United States, it obscures a larger issue between classes. According to the article, the birthing rate for “poor women” is more than that of the “wealthier” “professional” women by a fair amount. The poor will typically have a few children whereas the wealthier may now choose to have none.  Looking at numbers in this manner is important because the full picture obviously needs to be seen in order for more effective policy reform to ever happen. Yet, the idea of “choice” and type of reform needed is something the author and I differ greatly on.

 

The author did a poor job asserting upper class women’s lack of “choice” when it comes to the amount of children they have. The author said some “successful” women would rather get ahead in their career instead of have a family. Thus there is this added layer to the problem of choice outside the unplanned pregnancies of the “poor.” However, there are enough fluff pieces in magazines of late proclaiming women can have it all because “successful” women, as this article called them, typically do have the resources to balance family and work. What I think is more common through is that wealthier women (who want children) are now having children later because they are finishing their schooling and establishing their careers. While the women who don’t have kids, just plain make a choice not to have a child. Because honestly, more affluent people are actually able to plan and decide if they want kids. Whereas an unplanned pregnancy takes the deliberate action of planning out the equation all together. Therefore mentioning the obstacles some women have to plan around in conjunction with the actual issue of poverty just confuses the meaning of choice.

 

The article also touched upon the idea of better child care, which is obviously needed in the US, but not for the reasons mentioned in this article. As mentioned earlier, the more successful women have the money to pay for child care because they have the money/job to do so. Whereas the people with lower paying jobs can’t make ends meet partly due to the way maternity and child care in this country runs. So I think the country would need to change the system, not to cater to the upper class so they procreate more like the author implies, but to increase the mobility of the poor class. Doing this could decrease the amount of people growing up in poverty in order to raise the quality of life for some children. To me, this logic is a better reason to implement more affordable child care rather than the author’s classist concern that poor people are going to outnumber the amount of rich babies born in the US.  

 

Overall, I think this article makes a good point about showing the problem in terms of pregnancy rates being obscured. However, the manner in which the author discussed the “successful” classes “choice” and situation in relation to women in poverty aggravated me.    

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Latinization of Southern Space and Place

Latinization of Southern Space and Place | Geography | Scoop.it
The Latinization of Southern Space and Place project investigates how the myriad discourses of migration and globalization have become manifest graphically across social spaces and street graphics in the contemporary American South.

 

As local demographics change, so does the cultural landscape and--as evidenced by Alabama writing the toughest anti-immigration law in the U.S.--the political landscape.   


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GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps

GIS Lounge: Thanksgiving Maps | Geography | Scoop.it
Want to know where your Thanksgiving food comes from? 

 

This provides the geography of holiday food production with links to the data so you can map out the data with GIS (links produced by Western Illinois University). 


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abontempo's comment, January 30, 2012 2:13 PM
This is so interesting! I never really thought about how our thanksgiving meal is so different from others around the world!
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:52 PM

T-giving map stuff...

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What is GIS?

This is a brief introduction to what geographic information systems are.  This is not a tutorial on how to use it, but a conceptual overview on the potential uses and applications for GIS.  

 

Tags: GIS, video, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples, geospatial, mapping and location.


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CT Blake's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:55 AM

Useful for understanding the use of GIS and differences with GPS.

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Why Map Projections Matter

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection.  While a bit comical, the cartographic debate is quite informative even if it was designed to appear as though the issue was trivial. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  

 

Tags: Mapping, geospatial, video, visualization. 


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Lydia Blevins's comment, September 13, 2012 6:17 AM
I think it is very important that we start using more accurate maps. In school, the maps we use are so different from how the world actually is. I agree that children will grow up thinking some places are less important because they are minimized by the map projection.
Greg Atkinson's comment, October 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Great clip. I use it in my WRG class as a comedic introduction to the power of projection.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:01 PM

This absolutely the best video clip for SS teachers EVER!

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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | Geography | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


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Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 2014 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:24 AM

A face das crianças no mundo

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Geography | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

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How Can Geography Education be Profitable?

A short film on geo-literacy, knowing geography, and how it can make one a more profitable employee.

 

Instead of focusing on global and citizenship benefits,  this clip shows the marketable skills that geographic education gives students.  To read the transcript, and for added context, see: http://www.geographictravels.com/2012/05/geo-literacy-videos-by-national.html?goback=.gde_53689_member_115360670


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xkcd: Map Projections

xkcd: Map Projections | Geography | Scoop.it

Geo-geek humor -- A cartoon strip on the projector in the 3 minutes before class can be a good thing.  I'm a Robinson. 


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 10, 2012 11:06 AM
I feel the Robinson map is a closest representation of the world that is translated onto a 2-D map. All of the land masses and oceans look to be accurate without flattening the map completely and still having a curvature to it; which is more of a representation of the globe.
Emily Bian's curator insight, September 28, 2014 8:36 PM

This cartoon strip shows the different types of map projections, and has a caption of what your personality is like if you like the map projection.

I thought this was really funny, especially the caption for the Peters Projection. I'm a Robinson for sure, because I just like the way it looks. I think all the different types of maps are good and useful in their own way, even the Peters... I guess...

We also learned all the different types of map projections in class, which helped me recognize these maps. This is also a humorous way for people who don't know the different map projections to learn it while still having a fun and good time. Maps are an important element in APHUG, because everyone should know how to read maps. It's part of Unit 1, because it shows the landmasses, and some maps can show different perspectives on things.

This quirky and humorous map will help the students in next year's APHUG class the different map projections, while having fun and finding out their personality that goes along with the different maps.

1) key geographical skills

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:37 PM

This is a good overview of some different types of map projections and it has some humor too! I like how all the different types of map are all in one place. Also, each picture  is fairly detailed so that I can really see how one map is different from the next. I'm hoping this will be a good study tool in studying for the AP exam if there are any questions about different types of map projections.

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The Geography of Unemployment and the Recession

The Geography of Unemployment and the Recession | Geography | Scoop.it
Not every place and every citizen has been affected by the recession the same way...

 

For the Unemployed, Geography Can Be Destiny by Richard Florida.  This article highlights the uneven distribution of unemployment, and consequently, of job availability.  Where is unemployment highest?  How come? Getting a job isn't just about what you know and who you know, but where you know it.


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:41 PM

While the media often focuses on unemployment on a grand scale, regional trends can add insight to the problem at hand. Some places, such as Yuma, Arizona, have unemployment rates as high as 30% while other, like Fargo North Dakota have a safe 3% unemployment rate. At the height of the recession, unemployment was decently even across the country, but recovery has not been an even process. Demographics could be a large key to understanding these issues. Large metros are more resilient to unemployment due to the higher quantity of college graduates, and their positions as economic and creativity hubs. 

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U.S. Aging Population

U.S. Aging Population | Geography | Scoop.it
Richard Jackson talked about the economic, social, geopolitical, and demographic implications of the aging of the U.S. population, and he responded to telephone calls and electronic communications. Dr.

 

This video highlights the effects of the later stages of the demographic transition on economics, politics and cultural institutions on the most developed countries in the world.    


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:08 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the theme of the dependency ratio and the population pyramid. As the population ages, the dependency ratio increases as the elder population brackets of the population pyramid require funds from the working class population to sustain themselves.

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The Beginning of the End for Suburban America

The Beginning of the End for Suburban America | Geography | Scoop.it
The Beginning of the End for Suburban America...

 

A provocative title, but are our cities and urban settlement patterns shifting?  Is sprawl going to be curtailed by cultural, environmental and economic forces?


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The Kingdom Keepers's curator insight, February 10, 2014 10:10 AM

When suburban areas starting increasing, it had several advantages- Bigger homes, better education, a yard to call your own. These advantages are beginning to be shadowed by several factors that are actually pushing people out of these suburban areas and changing the urban pattern in our cities. Will people start to swarm in the central business district, or will rural areas reign? -Brooke

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:34 PM

This article shows how trends in energy consumption and the economy can affect geographies of development. After WWII, the United States hit an unprecedented economic boom. Large amounts of cheap oil combined with economic growth spurred the development of infrastructure and cities dependent on automobiles. Since people no longer had to live in the cities to work in them, they began developed outside of the city. Today, oil is becoming more and more expensive, which could mean the end of the age of the automobile. Since cities remain to be hubs of employment and business, people can no longer afford to drive long distances for their daily commutes. People are beginning to move into cities or along public transportation lines in order to more feasibly get to work. 

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, January 29, 2015 2:39 PM

Over the past 10-15 years, the suburbs grew dramatically, and have become less popular.  In the early 2000s it thrived because the economy was doing well, and technological advances were in hyper speed.  I was a bit shocked that it's slowed and that it's being reported that suburbs are coming to an end, but then it it started to make sense.  The unemployment rate was extremely high, as were gas prices.  It only makes sense that less people would be building or buying larger home with bigger cars and more appliances.  But, it was possibly better for our environment.  Less miles being driven means less pollution by cars, less electricity being used never hurts.  But now, gas prices have dropped again, and the unemployment rate has dropped as well. But, today we have so many alternatives to gasoline run cars and common electricity, that even if suburbs made a huge comeback, they wouldn't be the same as they were before.

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The Geography of Unemployment and the Recession

The Geography of Unemployment and the Recession | Geography | Scoop.it
Not every place and every citizen has been affected by the recession the same way...

 

For the Unemployed, Geography Can Be Destiny by Richard Florida.  This article highlights the uneven distribution of unemployment, and consequently, of job availability.  Where is unemployment highest?  How come? Getting a job isn't just about what you know and who you know, but where you know it.


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:41 PM

While the media often focuses on unemployment on a grand scale, regional trends can add insight to the problem at hand. Some places, such as Yuma, Arizona, have unemployment rates as high as 30% while other, like Fargo North Dakota have a safe 3% unemployment rate. At the height of the recession, unemployment was decently even across the country, but recovery has not been an even process. Demographics could be a large key to understanding these issues. Large metros are more resilient to unemployment due to the higher quantity of college graduates, and their positions as economic and creativity hubs. 

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Ground Zero "mosque" opens without protests

Ground Zero "mosque" opens without protests | Geography | Scoop.it
The proposed construction of an Islamic center near Ground Zero in New York caused outrage when it was announced two years ago. Now days after the 10-year anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the facility opened last night to no opposition.

 

This is an intriguing swing based on the initial reaction a few years ago about this Islamic cultural center.  Why the fervor 2 years ago?  Why the silence now?  These are worthwhile questions to explore with our students. 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:47 PM

In my opinion trying to stop the building of this was awful. American prides itself on being the land of the free and that includes freedom of religion regardless of what the horror that took place on 9/11. What was done on 9/11 can not be blamed on a whole population, race, or religion when it was the doing of one group. The rest of these innocent people who were are part of the United States of America were just as affected as the rest of us and it is good to see that this building was allowed to happen in peace.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:49 PM

The outrage over the "Ground Zero Mosque" several years ago was incredibly senseless and entirely discriminatory. This mosque was not on Ground Zero ans was in fact several blocks away, the only reason this became an issue is that select news sites (Fox) built up the issue relying on many Americans' Islamophobia in order to help their ratings and further the political cause of a select few. This is shown to be true as now no one is concerned at all as the story is "old". The actions of our biased media is disgusting at times.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 6, 2015 11:06 AM

This was a very interesting development.  Even more interesting was the reaction by many of the public.  On first glance, I guess it is understandable for one to say that it is "odd" developers decided to build a Muslim "mosque" within blocks of the 9/11 attacks.  Then after a little research you should be able to rationalize the situation and put it in perspective.

 

For beginners, it is not a "mosque" but a "community center" of sorts.  Secondly, I would ask critics whether they think a Christian church should be allowed in Oklahoma City, considering Terrorist Mcveigh of the 90's bombed buildings there.  Just because a certain "type" of individual commits a crime does not mean every person associated with that person's ethnicity or religion should be outcasted. One would think that this behavior would have been destroyed after the "mongolian" camps of California in the 1800's and the Japanese internment camps of the 1900's.  It is amazing that America being such a "civilized" country continues to react in such "savage" ways.