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Inside an Amazon Warehouse


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:


It is amazing how big this warehouse is. This warehouse must be a couple of acres because amazon is a big company that mostly everyone in the world buys from. it is also amazing how organized they are with all the inventory they get. Amazon is a great company that is helping people gets jobs to help improve there lives and also the economy in which is struggling to get back on it knees. I wonder were amazon has found this warehouse because there are not so many that have this much space. The workers must have golf carts to get around from one spot to the other. Amazon keep up the good work.

 

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noah taylor's comment, September 12, 2013 5:29 PM
wow, that is a super large warehouse. it reminds me of the shopping cart despensory at the ikea. it is incredible
noah taylor's comment, September 12, 2013 5:30 PM
to see something this lsarge and relavent to the world be built by human beings
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:45 AM

Online shopping is a great way to get your holiday gifts or just to regularly shop. By online shopping we do not have to go to the mall and walk around in all these different stores. What most people do not realize is when we online shop our orders are being processed somewhere and it is usually in big warehouse buildings. These buildings require a lot of space to hold all of a stores merchandise. 

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Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai

Taking Root tells the dramatic story of Kenyan Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai whose simple act of planting trees grew into a nationwide movement ...

 

Community, agriculture, gender, politics and the environment... it's all here in this inspiring clip.  


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

It seems that the people depend on planting. it also hurts that these people have little access to water. Where other parts in this world there is too much water and it is hurting the people. It is devastating what is happening to them. The trees that are planted could help them get water in some kind of way. But it might take them a while because to grow a tree it takes years to grow.

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Sean Rooney's comment, November 5, 2012 11:52 AM
S.R. This video clip covers a wide range of the different aspects in geography. We talked about the significant impact of natural resources in countries that rely on natural resources to stimulate the economy. For example, planting trees will stimulate the economy and create jobs in Africa. This is the first step towards industrialization in Africa. The community, agriculture, gender, politics, and the environment are all interconnected.
Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 6:22 PM

This is such an inspiring video. All it took was for one women, Wangari Maathai, to have an idea and to stand up for that idea for change to take place. How cool that from that one women a government was changed at 35 million trees planted!

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:02 PM

To me seem that it was more than just planting trees. Is was a way for this woman to have some type of control. Their story show how nothing is impossible, that sometimes we think that whatever little thing we do, it would not make a different. Those woman illustrate that no matter how powerless you feel. If you believe in something no stop until you get it accomplished.

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Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | Geography | Scoop.it
An amazing 26-second video depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880.

This quick visualization is a excellent summary of the data of anthropogenic climate change.


Via Nathan Phillips, Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

I wonder why the climate is changing so much it seems to be devastating. It can probably affect a lot of people because many people depend on a certain type of weather to grow food or do anything else that involves the weather like going for a swim in a pool or lake. The weather is something that many people need and depend on. Many people want the heat because they cant be in a cold area or vise versa. 

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 12, 2013 4:13 PM

A great visual dispay showing how tempetures have flucuated over the past 130 years and the futer implications of climate change today. Thoughout the video it shows how the tempeture is chaging (rising and falling) all acorss the board. However you cleary see at the end that tempeture stop flucuating and only contiues to rise. While over all it is only a 1 or 2 dagree differnce, its clear that if we go 80 years with a stable tempture and then it starts to only get warmer that weve got a climate change problam on our hands. 

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Billion Dollar U.S. Weather/Climate Disasters

Billion Dollar U.S. Weather/Climate Disasters | Geography | Scoop.it
Reports, publications, and data dealing with US weather and climate disasterous events.

 

NOAA notes that in the last 31 years there were 99 weather-related natural disasters that casued $1 billion worth of damage.  So that is a roughly 3 per year (with dollars adjusted for inflation).  In 2011, there were 14 natural disasters in the United States that caused over $1 billion in damage.  

 

Is this primarily due to climate change?  Are all of components of these natural disaters 'natural?'  What does this information say about the human-environmental interactions that we see today?    


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

It is incredible how powerful these natural disasters are. The disasters are very costly because they destroy so much and they consume so much time to rebuild. it is devastating the after math of these natural disasters. it seems that the us is getting the most disasters because we are the one that spends the most of building and helping other countries when they get hurt. One good example is the Philippines disaster in which killed and put hundreds of people out of there homes.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:29 PM

I don’t really know if this is due to climate changes. I do think that yeah we could call it “natural disaster” to the act but all those millions of dollar spended to fix all the damages cost by a hurricane, earthquake. They should be invested in preventing the damages. I do understand that those disaster cannot be prevented but the damages caused by definitely can be.

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Downtowns: How Did We Get Here?

Kennedy Smith is considered one of the nation's leading experts on downtowns, downtown economics, independent business development and the economic impact of urban sprawl, with a long career in downtown revitalization.

 

This video discusses the decline of the American Central Business District, the rise of shopping malls, the importance of the automobile and spatial organization of particular economic sectors.

 

Parts Two  http://vimeo.com/37041011 ; and Three  http://vimeo.com/37050944 ; continue the discussion with an emphasis on practical urban planning policies for small cities to revitalize the downtown region with some domestic and foreign examples. 


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

I have wondered about that where these downtowns came from. I have thought of it because I am very curious to learn about downtown providence and how it became a downtown. Where did the word downtown come from? It is amazing how things are being called in this world.

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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Geography | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

 


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:18 AM

Great info graphic on mega cities. 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 9, 2013 9:06 AM

More and more people are moving to the cities than ever before.  As a result I believe there are more megacities on the way.  However I think there is a limit to these cities.  How are they going to be powered?  How are the people going to be fed? Where will they work?  how will these cities impact the environment?  Where is all the fresh water going to come from?

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 4:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

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U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | Geography | Scoop.it

An excellent infographic that highlights the importance of education in the process of fighting poverty.  Why is education (especially women) so pivotal for development?  Should this change how we think about humanitarian aid?       


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:


This seems that it will help people be more informed about all these diseases that are killing people everyday and there still no cure to protect them. It is devastating to know how much people have to live with all theses diseases and they cannot do anything about it.

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Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 5:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 7:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 4:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

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What America Manufactures

What America Manufactures | Geography | Scoop.it

"It's a myth that the U.S. doesn't make anything anymore."  The U.S. economy still produces more through manufacturing tangible goods ($1.5 trillion) than it does in providing services ($600 billion) for the international market.  The maps and graphs in this article are great teaching materials.  The impact of NAFTA is shown powerfully in the regionalization of U.S. trade partners, making this salient material for a discussion on supranationalism as well.   


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:


This is great because now we can witness the creation of jobs in the country which can help the country get out of the depression that it is in. it also can help people get jobs and not have to worry about if there unemployment check is going enough to cover there expenses. Also people that are working are less likely to get depressed because they are not trapped in there homes because now they have something that is distracting them. But the United States is seeing a great improvement because of all the things being manufactured here. One good example is the Honda accord power plant and the ford motor company plant and even general motors in Detroit. all of these companies is helping the Americans get back into the workforce.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 12, 2013 6:28 PM

I will admit this kind of surprised me. For one I didnt know we were selling anything to China much less soybeans. Auto parts to Canada and gold to Europe where equally as surpsing as well. As far as exporting tv shows and movies goes that wasnt surpring with this day and age and everything being online that I can see.   

Marissa Roy's curator insight, October 15, 2013 7:39 AM

This article and map were very interesting. I like how the article breaks down what is being made and exported in America, because honestly I had no idea, as it seems everyone grumbles that we do not make anything more. Granted, we make a lot less than we have in the past, but we are still manufactoring quite an array of goods and services

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 12:34 PM

In the current ecnomny america is cleary importing more  than its exporting, but suprisingly not by much.  The mos common thing to find on many of todays products, cloths, phones, ect. is made in china , and beacuse of all this its a popular belife that  America doesnt make anything any more, we just buy all of our stuff from china. While this isnt true, america does not produce alot of final produts to distubite world wide. However they do have a large export of goods maily industral supply and capital goods, along with many services that add up to 2.1 trillion dollars. So while we might not be the leading  manufacture for plastic toys or cloths, its  nice to be reminded that we still contibute some things to the global trade community. 

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The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

This is a devastating time for the people of the Philippines. All they have to worry about is staying alive and being close to there family members. Help is on the way. Everyone in the world should pitch in and try to help them in anyway they can. But what I would like to find out is why this has happen when it has not before in this country. This country I have not seen in the news before this big devastation had happened. I am also curious to find out how come the help aid is taking so long to arrive when people are dying because they have no food available for them because it has been destroyed or it is trapped under all the debris from all the buildings that have collapsed because they were not structured properly. this situation is a repeat of hurricane Katrina in the united states were all the house were not hurricane proof and were built in places known for disaster.

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MaddieWalrus's curator insight, November 23, 2013 2:24 PM

After what has happened to the Philippines, it is even more unfortunate that they aren't that reachable for aid. I hope that even though the effort is tough peoe will still try to help them. They probably are and hopefully the people will fund an easier route to get to the Philippines. I am still saying prayers for them!

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 6:13 AM

Whenever there is a natural disater there is always trouble to get enough resources and aid to help the particular place who was hit with the disaster. Typically places who are hit with such disasters get immediate aid to try and help the victims as well as restore the area effected. However you never think about the geography of a place in means of getting aid there. We think of geography in the sense of it is not surprising such a distaster occured there, but not in a sense of can we get aid there. That is exactly what is being thought of about the Phillipeans. There is a lot of thought going into how aid can get there. People need water, sanitary conditions, food, and medical assistance. Not only do they need it, but they need it fast because the situation is getting worse. However there is no real way of getting it there. There location is making things extremely difficult to get that. Airports a such down, no way to get things there by sea on a good day, and their communication systems are down. The location of where these people live can potential kill them. You tend to think about location as a cultural sense, but location can also effect a person's well being. It is amazing how much location of where you live effects a person. Hopefully there will be things done soon to try and help the people in the phillipeans before things get even worse than they already are. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:26 PM

Access to this area is inhibited due to massive devastation, and there was a LOT of damage done.  These people have needs, and it seems that due to the large geographic spread, it would be near impossible to get these people what they need.  I think if our world revolved less around mandated activity- school, work (specifically the low level jobs that we don't NEED in our society), etc.- that more people could be freed up to help proactively come up with solutions to potential devastation, and groups could be formed, equipped, and trained to deal with whatever Nature could throw at people.  If people didn't work at McDonalds, and they DID work at some sort of international rescue agency, doing all the research on all areas of the world ahead of time, the solutions to these problems (and even prevention) could be at hand within a month of a global task force's initiation into the activity.  I know some Americans think that they need workers at McDonalds, but really... They could be working for something larger than the government- the entire human race.  I'm sure people would be willing to fund such an agency (not just some limited range minimal UN task force, but rather a world-wide formally designated occupation), and I'm equally sure that people would rather work there than flipping burgers and changing french fry oil.  I don't think that the current relief programs are enough to help people in such situations of tragedy as those that were relied on to take care of the issue in the Phillipines, and I think a simple restructuring of society (our society) would yield a greater level of concern and involvement in the welfare of others, as well as greater aid to the species.  Who knows, perhaps one of the people that we could save in the Phillipines is a person who goes on to change the world- an inventor of something new, a holy or political leader, or the scientist that cures cancer?  All this could be made to matter to us more if society were tweaked, even slightly, just to allow people to want to help others.

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"Pink Slime" - Mechanically Separated Meat

"Pink Slime" - Mechanically Separated Meat | Geography | Scoop.it

McDonald's, Burger King, and Taco Bell all agreed last week to promise to stop using ammonia-treated meat as more and more people learn that this "pink slime" is an earlier version of their finished product.  This meat has been treated with Ammonium Hydroxide, is no longer good enough for our fast food restaurants—but it IS still good enough for our schools (they don't need a PR slogan to sell).


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

That is gross how people eat that. it is amazing how people are blind to what they eat like this pink slime all these fast food chains are accused of selling to consumers. Now I have avoided eating at those places because of this. Now I eat out at Chipotle or Wendy’s or little local food businesses.

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Maria Lopez's curator insight, February 6, 12:28 AM

It is truly nauseating to believe that this this "pink slime" is what we could be consuming on a daily basis. While we are relying more and more on fast food, we fail to realize what it takes to make the food quicker to produce to the masses. This is literally as the article states "taking dog food and making it fit for humans." The saddest part is that this will likely be the food that our children consume in school if better health standards are not implemented to ensure that this does not happen. Our children are suppose to be our future so what good would it do feeding ammonia-treated meat. The only way to get corporations to make a change is for consumers to become informed and protest this treatment of food.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 9:56 AM

Even though this article was published last year, It is still a serious issue with the meat supply in North America. As discussed in class, only 2% of the work force is involved with agriculture. One of the primary reasons for migrating on the East coast, and Middle of the country, was because of its climate and soil, perfect for growing crops. Over the years our country has taken a serious turn with our food. We are trying to produce more food per worker and square foot of land and its only hurting us. This pink slime, ammonia-treated meat is treated in the first place so it kills any trace of ecoli. Which comes from cattle eating too much corn, which is what the cows in the country are fed, when their bodies are designed to eat grass, not corn. However, the US has lots of corn and so here raises a question, do we take care of our animals, give them enough grass to eat and sell Americans healthy beef? The answer is no, our food supply is a corporation burgers have to be sold and therefore the issue contines... 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 9:31 AM

I feel, generally speaking, that this is a result of our over-consumption of meat. If there wasn't such a high demand for meat these companies might not be looking into these sorts of alternative uses for these meat-like byproducts. The secondary reason for this is the negligence of personal accountability by officials and high paid USDA administrators that lack empathy and understanding of nutrition.

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EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism

EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism | Geography | Scoop.it
When horse meat was discovered in beef hamburgers in Ireland last month, governments, corporations and regulators assured a panicked public that it was complete

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, globalization, agribusiness.


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

Why would someone want to do that to a horse? Horses are a great addition to the world because they can come in handy when it comes to pulling cargo and other objects also. Horses are having helped people for hundreds of years. I would go crazy if I found out I was eating horse meet. I am very surprised that those people from Ireland did not find out. There should really be an organization that checks the meet before it goes to supermarkets and other places. 

 

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chris tobin's curator insight, February 28, 2013 11:09 AM

Horsemeat showed up in London and the media interviewed many people who were appalled and wondering "how safe IS our meat?"

We now have to 'backtrack' to see where in the marketing loop  in between countries this actually is occurring, and also to see how regulations fell through the 'cracks'.

 

chris tobin's comment, February 28, 2013 12:44 PM
Yes the industry is all about money. The US needs to change their ways, especially in the beef and poultry business. Its mass production, inhumane to animals, and unhealthy .
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 5:12 PM

What trends in agribusiness are conveyed in this map?

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Corruption versus human development

Corruption versus human development | Geography | Scoop.it

Which countries/regions struggle the most with corruption in their political institutions?  Which countries/regions struggle with development?  Why does corruption seem to be correlated with development? 


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

It seems that New Zealand is the country to live in because it has less corruption. But one day the corruption will start and that would be the country no one would like to be living in. the United States is also a great place to live in but in certain areas. That goes for New Zealand also. But what I am curious why in other countries there is so much corruption in all these other countries like Congo and Afghanistan. Maybe that one day will change.

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The 2011 Failed States Index

The 2011 Failed States Index | Geography | Scoop.it

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  Foreign Policy, in conjunction with the Fund for Peace, has created a statistical ranking to measure the lack of effective political institutions.  For the 4th year running, Somalia has been statistically measured as the most failed state on Earth. Chad and Sudan are respectively ranked as the 2nd and 3rd most failed states.The 12 metrics that are a part of this index are:

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Illegitimate Govts.

•Brain Drain

•Public Services

•Inequality

•Group Grievances

•Human Rights

•Economic Decline

•Security Forces

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

 I wonder why it is difficult for states to be formed. I would think it would be great because the village people won’t be forced to make big decisions they can just hire someone to do it for them. But in the other hand there would be other people who will make it difficult for them and will ruin it for everyone else. Becoming a state can change there live. They should have approved to become a state.

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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 16, 2012 6:57 PM
The global fallout of the Arab revolutions may be largely determined by demographics and political stability. Unlike Somalia for example which is in total anarchy, the Arab Spring uprisings occurred in more stable but oppressive governments. So this brings up the question, can a failed state rescue itself?
Derek Ethier's comment, November 5, 2012 11:35 AM
Althought sub-Saharan Africa has 5 of the 10 most quickly developing countries, they still lag very far behind the rest of the world in quality of living. Somalia, Chad and Suda are the most failed states on Earth, in order. The governments are unable to protect/provide for their people, brain drains suck the great minds to more developed countries, income inequalities ravage the nations, basic human rights are denied and the economies are pathetic. Overall, it is a sad story as many of these African nations also suffer from drought, famine and massive food shortages.
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2008 Election Maps

2008 Election Maps | Geography | Scoop.it

As the election year is ramping up, now is a good time to introduce electoral geography (since there are millions of dollars been spent of this type of analysis).  Displayed is the county map of the 2008 presidential election (McCain=red, Obama=blue).  What are the geographic and demographic characteristics of the 2008 voting base of both the Republican and Democratic parties?  This is also a great map to discuss how to interpret maps--how could this map be misleading?  What additional information is needed to contextualize this data?  Follow the link for additional maps that provide attempt to visualize that context.    


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

It is amazing how a map can throw people off. It looks like McCain was winning but at the end Obama has won because more people have voted for him than his competitor. Also in the shaded blue area are much more populated then the areas in red because the red area are surrounded by woods and also the red area is like the suburbs of the city. It is very different how maps are portrayed and how misleading they can be. Never depend on one source find as many as you can to make your interpretations   

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, September 16, 2012 12:03 PM
At first glance I would assume McCain would win; the map has a higher percentage of red. However, due to population density, we have to consider how many people live in the red areas as compared to the blue. Obama won the election because there are more peolpe/voters in the blue area compared to the red. The colors may be deceiving so we need to consider other factors.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 12, 2013 10:05 AM

I really enjoyed this article, it was insctieful interesting and had very informitive visual aids. It was very interesting to see all the differnt maps prtayted thoughout the artile. I found that the infomation that they were describing was alot of things I had heard before, but the added affect of the visual aids were able to give me a deeper understading. It also really brings up some key geogragaphical regaions and shows how even thouhg a state might be blue there are still areas(towns, countis) with in the sate that are primarly red party. When this election was going on it sure seemed like it was goiing to be neck and neck, but clearly on election day bule took over .

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Pavan Sukhdev: Put a value on nature!

TED Talks Every day, we use materials from the earth without thinking, for free. But what if we had to pay for their true value: would it make us more careful about what we use and what we waste?

 

Companies derive economic value from the environment without paying the true environmental costs of their enterprises.  Sukhdev call this the 'Economic Invisibilty of Nature.'  Many countries are mortgaging their environment's future for economic growth today.  This also disproportionately impacts the developing world and rural people more adversely.  Key to his argument is that we need to identify negative externalities on the environment that produce private profits and acknowledge them as public losses.  


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

Nature is very important because everyone in the world depends on it because that is where we can get the oxygen that we need to live and also we can hunt for food because many people in this world do not have access to a supermarket because it is to far or they just don’t believe in the existence of a supermarket. I wonder why some people would decide to live so far from civilization because I could not do that. I would get depressed very quickly because there would be nothing to do there.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

This a very interesting topic. Most of the time we take our earth for granted imagine if we need to pay for every time we use our earth I don’t think we would to afford it. Is very important for us to take care of it. It so sad that we have to force to protect it; for example here in providence we get punish with a fine if we don’t recycle. Taking care of our world should be a feeling from within people shouldn’t be made to do it.

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The Economics of Sustainability

http://www.ted.com Have we used up all our resources? Have we filled up all the livable space on Earth? Paul Gilding suggests we have, and the possibility of...

 

This provocatively title TED talk would be an excellent resource for discussing sustainable development.  What are the economic, environmental, political and cultural ramifications of suggested policies that seek to lead towards sustainable development?  What are the ramifications of not changing policies towards sustainable development?  


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

 I found this video very interesting because it spoke about how there is so little space and more and more people are having kids. But there is no space because everyone likes having a lot of room to expand that is why because everyone in the world could fit in the state of California. So there is space it is just not spread out good enough that everyone could fit comfortably. 

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Public Spaces Worth Caring About...

http://www.ted.com In James Howard Kunstler's view, public spaces should be inspired centers of civic life and the physical manifestation of the common good....

 

Kunstler impassionedly argues that American architecture and urban planning are not creating public places that encourage interaction and communal engagement.  We should create more distinct places that foster a sense of place that is 'worth fighting for,' as opposed to suburbia which he sees as emblematic of these problems.  How should we design cities to create a strong sense of place?  What elements are necessary?  Warning: He uses some strong language.   


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Kenny Dominguez's insight:

Everyone in the world should care about places if it is small or not known but a place has it own character that some people enjoy while other do not want to know about. Every place has it significance that many people have not noticed because they are blinded to it. People should really have an open mind when it comes down to experiencing new places and learn about its history or anything that you did not know about it.

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Mary Burke's comment, April 15, 2013 9:24 AM
I appreciate what this guy is saying. I wish we could build places worth caring about. We need more people like Mr Kunstler. But I don't things are as bleak as he depicts. He picked some of the ugliest places there are. We do need a sense of place. Right now we get that in our homes. I think what Mr Kunstler is talking about is a community based sense of place that could be created just with the kind of buildings we make in the space. Maybe we could create a friendly atmosphere with well designed buildings. We need to start somewhere to make people not so afraid of each other.
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Kabul, A City Stretched Beyond Its Limits

Decades of war, migration and chaotic sprawl have turned the Afghan capital into a barely functioning dust bowl. The city's tired infrastructure is crumbling; water, sewers and electricity are in short supply.

 

Keeping an urban system running smoothly is a difficult proposition in developed countries that are stable--what is in like a place like Afghanistan?  This podcast is a excellent glimpse into the cultural, economic, environmental and political struggles of a city like Kabul.  This is urban geography in about a problematic a situation as possible.   


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Kenny Dominguez's insight:

I am very surprise that people still live in Kabul because of all the wars. If those wars continue they could probably die by any attack or any thing else that can kill them. They are in the middle of devastation. They can get killed at anytime. But some people live a bit well because they are not so close to the fighting war. But also the city of Kabul could probably see an increase in there economy because more and more people want to move there because it seems that there economy is getting better. In Kabul there are many stories available that some of them just break your heart.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 22, 2013 6:13 AM

This source focuses on Kabul and the ways in which the capital city has changed over time.  Kabul used to flourish as a center of culture and commerce but now the city is very poor and it has flooded with migrants trying to find opportunity and refuge from war elsewhere in Afghanistan.  The city has so many problems.  For example, citizens of Kabul do not have electricity or water, so they must purchase these resources from private agencies.  People are trying to rebuild the city by renovating buildings and homes.  Where will the city be in years to come?

Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 19, 2013 7:28 AM

This was a really interesting podcast. Kabul has been damaged by wars and chaos. Now, the city does not have room for all of the people who have migrated in. It is now so cramped that amenities such as water, sewer and electricity are difficult to come by. The infastructure and streets were not meant for the amount of people. The government does not know what to do, so they are doing nothing. There is so much pollution, traffic and lack of resources, that the wealthy are moving out, which is just making room for more immigrants who the city cannot support. It is a very messy and dangerous problem. I think the government needs to deter people from migrating in, because they truly sound like they cannot handle more people.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 8:49 PM

The podcast details the capital city of Kabul, Afghanistan. War has caused a population boom in the city as people migrate away from the war-torn areas of the country to the safer city. There are some serious problems with transportation infrastructure in the city and the population increases have only made the problem worse. War has also increased opium production and trade. The city is now dotted with opulent looking "Opium Houses" which are shoddily constructed and just rubble waiting for the next earthquake. Outside the metropolitan area of the city, planned communities of the more wealthy and educated are cropping up, leaving the city itself full of the poverty stricken with no place else to turn.

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Providence and the Virtues of Scale

Providence and the Virtues of Scale | Geography | Scoop.it

I live in the Providence metropolitan area so this particular blog posting about urban planning and economic revitalization hit very close to home.   

 

Rhode Islanders: how accurate do you feel this perspective on Providence and it's economic assets (and deficiencies) is?  What other aspects would you discuss in trying to understand the economic geography of the area?  What are the biggest obstacles for improving the city? 


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Kenny Dominguez's insight:

Well the providence area we are seeing a boost when it comes down to people getting jobs and also more people are coming to providence because of all it has to offer. Providence has lots to offer. One good thing that providence has to offer is one of the best schools in the area. Many people come and see and take in the scenery that just blows your mind. Also the economy seems to be getting better because this city seems not to be in such of a bad deficit. The city of providence in a couple of more years we will see a tremendous growth that the city will benefit from.

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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 6:52 AM

This article shows how you can improve a city to not only make it bigger but to make it better. not better in the sense that it has to beat out other cities and have the best buildings etc. but to allow the city to be more people friendly which means getting rid of congestion and traffic.

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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?  


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Kenny Dominguez's insight:


This caught my attention because how does everyone have access to so many new things. It is great that there economy is growing but not everyone is part of the growth. But what surprises me that people that owns phones but do not have a bathroom with functioning toilets. The government seems to be falling behind on the high demand of sanitation. People are even not inviting their family members over because of that reason. The government needs to step up it game because more and more people are being born and they might have to go through what some people are going through now.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:59 AM

With the growing number of people in general and the economy growing giving access to more "stuff" the governement seems to have fallen behind in providing the infrastructure to support this type of growth.  Yes it is easier to get a phone then to get plumbing..why?  It is not like the US where most cities have the basic infrastructure set up...there is a main sewer line.  It might be expnsive to hook up to, but it is relatively simple and inexpensive when compare to not have a main line to begin with.  That requires a major industrial effort, city planning, major disruption to the daily life.  In the US, adding a main sewer line is a big job, but its one which can be done easily when compared to other countries.  India is an economic boom, alot of activity, but they also need to step up to get the basic infrastructure down so all the people can take advantage of this new wealth.  It is the largest democracy in the world, but it lacks the industrial muscle to take on large civic projects that are necessary to keep up with the growth.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 11:44 AM

This ratio is strange, yet somewhat easy to believe.  India, a country with a large fraction of the world's population can easily benefit from technology.  Cell phones and other electronics are easy to come by, can easily be replaced, and are always steadily available with new releases.  On the other hand is sewage systems and water supplies.  In a region that lacks "proper" living conditions due to the growth of people and increase of city living and slums, it would be hard to keep up with the a demand of toilets and running water.  It is basically impossible to accomodate everyone with a bathroom, the resources just aren't available.  In a nutshell, it's easier to buy a handheld device than to buy a toilet system.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 1:45 PM

This NPR podast reflects the geographic theme of development, specifically the uneven development of India. Despite a rising economy, the infrastructure of the country is not keeping up. While many people buy things, have "personal wealth," they live in conditions that betray their poverty.

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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


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Kenny Dominguez's insight:


This is incredible I am very surprised that none of those workers fell because they are pretty up high from the ground. The person on the digger must be really desperate for money because that is something that many people would not do. It seems that the people of Beijing do not care about their lives. I wonder why none of these people care for there safety. In china it seems that people would do anything for a paycheck. I understand that they have to support their families but there are many different ways to do that. But it is incredible how good the economy is in china but these are the reason why because they do not have these groups that protect the workers like the United States. It is good but at the same time it is risky because your life is at risk.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:13 PM

This video is jaw-dropping proof of how China cuts corners in their quest for growing their economy. With such a large population looking for work China does not really need to protect their workers. I wonder if China will experience a labor movement similar to the one in the US that introduced protective legislation.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 6:19 AM

This video shows a complete lack of concern for worker safety in China. The workers use the backhoe as a makeshift platform so one of them can cut the rebar suspending a massive piece of concrete from the side of the building. These kinds of shortcuts are the ways which China is able to keep a competitive edge in the world market. With hardly any regard for fair wages, worker safety, or worker rights, China is able to manufacture goods for prices no one else can compete with. Eventually, China will face opposition from its workforce as its industry matures and the government can either appease them or face revolution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:47 PM

In Beijing, workers safety is not a top priority. This video may shock viewers to the extreme levels workers will go to for such a small paycheck. This worker, many stories up climbs onto an excavator to be lowered down to a area that could not be reached. It is insane how these unsafe conditions compare to Americas. It makes you wonder how China has such a growing economy and a global leader when when things like this are happening on a day to day basis.

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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
Kenny Dominguez's insight:

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:39 AM

It isn't surprising that the more a country has developed, the more wasteful they are. I just think that we need to change this standard. We can not keep this up if we want to sustain ourselves for centuries to come. If we are going to change our consumption culture, we need to look at why it has become the way it is. Why do we see food as unappealing? This is an interesting video and certaintly makes you think twice about throwing anything away. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:51 PM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

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McDonald’s® Packaging

McDonald’s® Packaging | Geography | Scoop.it

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Kenny Dominguez's insight:

Fries are the essential food that everyone enjoys in the world. But it is a good thing because if a potato has a growth defect probably that would affect someone and that is a law suit waiting to happen. In the United States people love suing for anything that they could probably win and receive money. The fries are delicious but they are so fattening that could really effect people if they have any issues with there health. 

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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 1:35 PM
It is somewhat erroneous that McDonald’s wants to redo their packaging to emphasize on fresh material. First off, I worked in fast food and I can tell you while some things are freshly cut and grown, many aren’t. McDonalds actually doesn’t even cut their own onions like Burger King, they receive them dehydrated and they have to reconstitute them every morning. To me that is just gross. It is crazy to think that this new push for nutrition will actually convince people that what they are eating is healthy, its jut crazy. Just because my fry carton has a potato on it does not mean that I am going to consider that equal to a baked potato I eat at home. I agree with David, just because the packaging shows fresh food does not mean that what you’re getting is fresh just like how Mary said that the food by the time its shipped over is not fresh anymore.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:34 AM

It is sad that so much foods gets wasted all the time because it doesn't look appealing to buyers. Just because some potaoe is shaped funny or is a little darker or lighter than what is considered "normal", it is thrown away. To me, that is ridiculous when so many people are starving around the world. Or that these imperfect foods are given to animals for consumption. Why is it acceptable to animals to eat bad food when we are going to eat those animals? Somewhere down the line of history, the way we view food has been changed and not for the better. If we want to be able to sustain ourselves and this world for many more centuries, we need to revalute how we look at food. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 7, 2013 6:58 AM

I have eaten McDonalds fries and bunch of times and never thought about what 'golden standard" actually meant. McDonalds like it says in the article is one of the top potoate buyers in the world. I'm sure most other fast food places aren' too far behind. However since McDonalds is one of the top buyers of potatoes farmers much make sure they produce enough of the potatoes that McDonalds sells. However it doesn't stop there. Not only do farmers have to produce enough potatoes, but they have to produce quality potatoes. All of McDonalds fries look exactly the same. You never really get a french fry that looks extremely different. That is done on purpose. McDonalds only purchases potatoes that meet their "golden standard". This makes you think how much goes to watste. Farmers are probably discarding "bad" potatoes all the time that don't meet the "golden standard". Does it really matter what the fries look like, if they taste the same? There are people in the world who are hungry, yet we waste food like this all the time. I really don't think it is that big of a deal if not every french fry looks exactly the same. We should make an attempt at trying to limit our food waste. 

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Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger | Geography | Scoop.it
The supercheap and palatable noodles help low-wage workers around the world get by, anthropologists argue in a new book. And rather than lament the ascendance of this highly processed food, they argue we should try to make it more nutritious.

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Kenny Dominguez's insight:

It is amazing what ramen noodles can do. Many people in this world do even want to see ramen noodles while other people would die to have some food in there systems. Ramen noodles are good for people who are on a budget like college students or people who are struggling to make `ends meet. It amazing what some people take for granted. Some people would wish to have ramen noodles to eat.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:06 PM

Ramen became an essential food to help the people who were starving all over the world. This food is cheap to buy and easy to make so it is a perfect food to feed millions of people who are starving everyday. The only bad thing about it is that it is not very healthy to be eating constantly. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:10 AM

Its pretty crazy to think something as simple as ramen noodles can help feed billions of people. in the western world iramen is the butt currently for running jokes about poor college kids, i never thought it would have this impact. I can now say that ramen is a nessicty in some areas. Who cares about the slight health affects because if some of this people didnt have ramen they would already be dead from starvation. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:32 PM

I think everyone has had ramen noodles at some point in there life. I do enjoy ramen noodles here and there but couldn't eat it daily. I have found in some of my cookbooks they use ramen noodles in their recipes. It is mostly the quick and easy recipes.  if we are the 6th highest country that purchases ramen noodles I am convinced everyone eats it. 

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NCSS: War and Terrorism

NCSS: War and Terrorism | Geography | Scoop.it

The resources tab of the National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) webpage is a treasure trove of lesson plan materials for teachers. This particular link focuses on War and Terrorism, and provides resources to help teachers to educate their classes about the emerging geopolitical landscape. This is a set of over 30 lesson plans, articles, maps and resources that focus on the U.S. war in Iraq, terrorism, and other military incursions in the Middle East. Collectively they give geographic perspective on current events so students can understand more about the places in the world that they hear about in the news.


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Kenny Dominguez's insight:

This must be a great teaching plan so students can be thought about what is going on in the world. It also shows them what is going on in Iraq and in the Middle East and it could probably trigger one of them to fight back and change the Middle East from all the discrimination towards women and probably destroy all these bad groups that just have a motive to destroy and kill.

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What Sex Means for World Peace

What Sex Means for World Peace | Geography | Scoop.it

"The evidence is clear: The best predictor of a state's stability is how its women are treated." 

 

This article, based on the research derived from the Woman Stats Project (http://womanstats.org/ ), outlines clearly the political significance of cultural values.  Discussion questions: Why would the levels of gender empowerment be a factor in state stability?  What connections are there between cultural and political institutions within a state?   


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Kenny Dominguez's insight:

It is very sad to see how women are treated in this world. Women have to work twice as hard to be recognized in this world. Many women suffer on day to day bases because they are not treated well as men are. In many countries women are not equal to everyone else. One good example is in Saudi Arabia in which women have no rights. Women now are getting little bit of freedom but that can be taken away at anytime. That is not like the United States in which women are equal. 

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 7, 2013 6:50 PM

This article is extremely eye opening. When I think about Women's freedom in america compared to other countries in the world I feel that most countries cannot compare. Women in america have so much freedom that women in other countries don't have. However one fact in the article that I thought was shocking was that when we invaded Iraq and Afganistan we urged that women be more involved in the government because the numbers were very low. However now both of those countries exceed the percentage of women involved in the U.S. We went in arguing for something we don't even have in our own country. That is so shocking to me. However I do believe that women in other countries have it a lot worse. It is hard for me to wrap my brain around the fact that in some countries it is frowned upon that women can recieve an education. In some places it is not just frowned upon, but forbidden. The women in Saudi Arabia just passed a law for some women to play sports. That is amazing! I believe that the United States sets an example of how women should be treated and for every country to get to that point will take a very long time. Thus, I'm not sure if we will ever get world peace. A lot of countries will never view women as equals, at least not in the near future. That is truly sad to think about. Again that goes back to the culture of the location that you grew up in. It's hard for countries to change their cultural beliefs.