Geography
45 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Geography Education
onto Geography
Scoop.it!

3 Ways to Make Compelling Maps

3 Ways to Make Compelling Maps | Geography | Scoop.it

"What makes a good map?  How can we tell what makes a good map?


Via Seth Dixon
Jye Watson's insight:

Mapping tips

more...
SchoolandUniversity's curator insight, June 1, 2013 1:45 AM

http://bit.ly/11hvYJo

 

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, June 1, 2013 7:08 AM

Maneras de hacer a los mapas más expresivos y convincentes

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Private jets flooding the Las Vegas airport before the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight

Private jets flooding the Las Vegas airport before the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight | Geography | Scoop.it
The airport is reportedly closed to private jets.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 2015 12:53 PM

In a world where money grants you certain access and privilege, this is what happens when many seek to leverage their privilege simultaneously only to realize that they have to get in line like the common folks too.


In the Pixar Movie the Incredibles, Mrs. Incredible exasperately tells her son, "Everyone is special, Dash."  Dash grumbles under his breath and replies, "Which is another way of saying no one is." 


Tags: transportationclass.

Christian Faltado Cantos's curator insight, May 5, 2015 9:54 PM

Here what boxing and money can do....

Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin

Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin | Geography | Scoop.it
An arid region grew even drier between 2003 and 2009 due to human consumption of water for drinking and agriculture.

Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
James Hobson's curator insight, October 22, 2014 6:24 PM

(Southwest Asia topic 2)

The area known as the Cradle of Humanity is becoming less hospitable. Though natural climate change can be attributed to the dryer conditions, humans have made just as much of an impact. Increased water usage leads to less reserve. Impacts stretch further, however. Less water flow below the dam can lead to changes in sedimentation patterns and disrupt wildlife habitats, potentially causing harm to wildlife.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:09 PM

Similar to the Aral Sea,  the Tigris and Euphrates river basins have become drier and drier between 2003 and 2009. It is important to see all the aspects that have caused the rive to dry out and its do to there own people in this region. About 60 percent of the loss was attributed to the pumping of groundwater from underground reservoirs. Most of the problems are due to that about one-fifth of the water losses came from snowpack shrinking and soil drying up, partly in response to a 2007 drought. These could be some of the environmental issues but also there has been tremendous population increases in this region. This water is perfect drinking water for the people of South East Asia and the countries surrounding it but numbers are extremely high. 

It is important to analyze how us humans can change the geography of a certain area in such little time. 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:19 PM

The middle east has lost a huge portion of its freshwater over the past decade. The two natural-color images above were acquired by the Landsat satellites and show the shrinking of the Qadisiyah Reservoir in Iraq between September 7, 2006 and September 15, 2009. The first graph shows the elevation of the water in that reservoir between January 2003 and December 2009. The second graph shows water storage from January 2003 to December 2009. Obtaining ground data information in the middle east can be difficult.The researchers calculated that about one-fifth of the water losses in their Tigris-Euphrates study region came from snowpack shrinking and soil drying up, partly in response to a 2007 drought.

Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East | Geography | Scoop.it
A new study using data from a pair of gravity-measuring NASA satellites finds that large parts of the arid Middle East region lost freshwater reserves rapidly during the past decade.

 

"[This] data show an alarming rate of decrease in total water storage in the Tigris and Euphrates river basins, which currently have the second fastest rate of groundwater storage loss on Earth, after India," said Jay Famiglietti, principal investigator of the study and a hydrologist and professor at UC Irvine. "The rate was especially striking after the 2007 drought. Meanwhile, demand for freshwater continues to rise, and the region does not coordinate its water management because of different interpretations of international laws."

 

Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend, Middle East, Iraq.


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 10:00 PM

This is a perfect example of geospatial technologies can lead to a better understanding of how the Earth's physical systems are changing because of human geography.  Teaching geography is about showing how these systems are interconnected.   

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:24 AM

Water is a big issue in an arid area.  The fact that we can measure the amount of groundwater present in an area with a satellite is amazing to me.  The issue of water rights and control in this region will someday over take that of oil rights and use in my opinion.  Once people get used to free flowing water to use on demand it will cause problems politically when these sources of ground water inevitably dry up.

Rescooped by Jye Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Does Your Water Come From?

Where Does Your Water Come From? | Geography | Scoop.it

This interactive map documents where 443 million people around the world get there water (although the United States data is by far the most extensive).  Most people can't answer this question.  A recent poll by The Nature Conservancy discoverd that 77% of Americans (not on private well water) don't know where their water comes from, they just drink it.  This link has videos, infographics and suggestions to promote cleaner water.  This is also a fabulous example of an embedded map using ArcGIS Online to share geospatial data with a wider audience.  

 

Tags: GIS, water, fluvial, environment, ESRI, pollution, development, consumption, resources, mapping, environment depend, cartography, geospatial. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nic Hardisty's comment, October 15, 2012 9:01 AM
I was definitely unaware of where my drinking water came from. This is nice, user-friendly map... Hopefully it gets updated regularly, as it will be interesting to see how these sources change over time.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 3:55 PM

water is a resource we all depend on. Some of my best studies were on local Chesapeake Bay issues.

Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay

Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay | Geography | Scoop.it
It is increasingly clear that we already live in the era of human-induced climate change, with unprecedented weather and climate extremes.

 

I don't delight in sharing the bad news.  So is this drought just a freak anomaly or a sign of a new normal?


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, August 13, 2012 2:28 PM
The graphic was not connected to the article. It was linked on a PBS facebook page and I linked the juxtaposition of the graphic and the NY Times article. Here is the FB page: https://www.facebook.com/EarthTheOperatorsManual.Page Personally, an entire century as a baseline of comparison does not feel like cherrypicking data. True the Earth is an incredibly complex system that controlling for all variables is in essence impossible, but denying that the system has changed seems foolish to me. Why has the system changed? I'm okay with that being a reasonable debate worthy of academics.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Water and Development

Water and Development | Geography | Scoop.it

When access to clean drinking water is an issue, it creates a web of developmental problems for a community.  For a video with more information about water/development statistics, but the organization http://charitywater.org see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCHhwxvQqxg&feature=player_embedded


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
David 's comment, May 21, 2012 11:58 PM
thank you for your awesome information
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Could there be 'Water Wars' in the Future?

Could there be 'Water Wars' in the Future? | Geography | Scoop.it

The debate on aquifers continues as new technologies designed by oil companies are able to tap historic water reserves deep in the Earth's crust.  The geopolitical significance of water rises as population growth within dry climates continue to rise.   As more countries (and people) compete for limited resources, outbreaks of armed conflict becomes more likely.   The more pertinent question might not be 'if' but 'when.'


Via Kyle M Norton, Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, October 5, 2012 11:55 PM
My colleagues at the National Council for Geographic Education LOVE this link...many people have seen your work and it's impacted teachers all over the country.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

South Asian floods take economic toll

Environmental degradation, seasonally high rainfall, a low elevation profile and climate change combine in a very bad way for Bangladesh.  Flooding, given these geographic characteristics, is essentially a regular occurence.   For a more in-depth look at these issues from the same media outlet, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wj0iZiivYJc&feature=player_embedded#!


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 7, 2012 3:41 PM
The people that live here understand that they will have flooding every year. They're smart to build elevated roads so they have some way of transportation over flooded areas. It's weird to think that this is a normal thing for them and for us we close everything down and wait in our houses.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 7, 2012 12:17 AM
In an area already stricken with poverty, the floods manifest the problems. High rains and low elevations cause massive floods in areas such as Bangladesh and Nepal. Most areas do not receive aid, especially the remote areas of the villages.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 4:55 PM

The "socio-economics of flooding" is a side of the natural disaster we don't normally think about. People most affected by floods tend to live in areas with poor infrastructure and large populations. Their displacement to cities, like Dhaka, has incredible cost. For both the family and the new place they relocate to. 

Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Water.org

Water.org | Geography | Scoop.it

Over 1 billion people can stream music and videos in this increasingly technologically advanced world.  It is estimated that 1.2 billion people have access to the internet.  Simultaneously, we live in a world where 884 million people still do not have access to clean water.  The digital divide is troubling, but the fact that millions don't have access to clean water, toilets or sanitation is horrifying.  This site is one way to be a part of the solution.   


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
ASeagrave's comment, January 30, 2012 2:18 PM
I cannot believe three times our entire population is somewhere in the world without clean water when all we have to do is walk to the nearest sink to get it. It's sad.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Talk point: is water a commodity or a human right?

Talk point: is water a commodity or a human right? | Geography | Scoop.it
In this month's podcast we'll be discussing the pressure on water resources. We want to hear your thoughts

Via geographil, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Human/Environmental Interactions

The collapse of the Aral Sea ecosystem is (arguably) the man-made environmental disaster of the 20th century.  Soviet mismanagement, water-intensive cotton production and population growth have all contributed the overtaxing of water resources in the Aral Sea basin, which has resulted in a the shrinking of the Aral Sea--it has lost more of the sea to an expanding desert than the territories of the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg combined.  The health problems arising from this issues are large for the entire Aral Sea basin, which encompasses 5 Central Asian countries and it has profoundly changed (for the worse) the local climates. 


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 20, 2013 1:11 PM

This has to be one of the most telling video of an environmental disaster I have even seen.  A whole sea, 26,000 square miles, bigger than the state of West Virginia, is bascially gone due to Soviet mismanagement.  This is an environmental disaster now that the Russians do not have to deal with as it is now located in the independant country of Kazakhstan.  It effects them as well as the new countries that have come to be withthe collapse of the USSR.  Seems Russian dodged this just like Chernobyl.  This is something we need to lean from, on how not to use a natural resource until it literally has dried up.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 12:24 PM

The Aral Sea, located in Central Asia is a very important water source for the entire region.  Unfortunately, the Soviet Union designated this water sources as one which would provide water to rice and cotton crops, which are both very water-intensive crops.  This has resulted in desertification of the area due to the cyclical shrinking volume of the lake.  Sands and chemicals are now free to blow around, affecting people's health.  This is one of the best examples on earth of environmental exploitation due to a lack of environmental planning.  When the lake dries up, the inhabitants of the surrounding countries will be in huge trouble.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, October 6, 2014 10:38 PM

The Aral Sea was a source of food for the residents, as it was home to thousands of fish and water was used to irrigate crops.Also acted as a climate regulator. Therefore, its virtual disappearance has caused winters and summers are extreme.Today the drought is considered one of the greatest ecological disasters caused by man. scientists estimated that the Aral sea will disappear before 2020. A plan to expand the cultivation of cotton throughout Central Asia and thus a system of canals for irrigation that significantly decreased the amount of water reaching the Aral Sea. It angers me to see that the human has being causing many natural disasters.

Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Seametrics-global-water-crisis.jpg (1000x5579 pixels)

Seametrics-global-water-crisis.jpg (1000x5579 pixels) | Geography | Scoop.it

Via geographil, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Pressure on dwindling resources 'threatens global chaos'

Pressure on dwindling resources 'threatens global chaos' | Geography | Scoop.it
Pressure on the world's resources is becoming so great the situation could trigger a proliferation of hunger and warfare hugely damaging to the global economy, according to an analysis published today.

Via geographil, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Developing Spatial Literacy
Scoop.it!

Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.

 

This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).

 

Tags: transportation, urban, mapping, cartography, planning, TED, video, unit 7 cities.


Via Seth Dixon, Greenroom Dweller
more...
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Hot Commodities

Hot Commodities | Geography | Scoop.it

"77 Photos of the mass production of the Earth's natural resources.  In the picture above, a Tibetan villager works in a salt field. Salt has been the most common food preservative, especially for meat, for thousands of years." 

Tags: consumption, agriculture, resources, labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 6:55 PM

Coal, steel, gold, iron, copper, aluminum and oil are all incredibly important commodities.  Agricultural products such as rice, cotton, corn, wheat and coffee all travel far beyond their area of origin.   Where do these resources come from?  How are they produced?  This gallery of 77 pictures is a fantastic tour of the resources that are key cogs in the global economy.  

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 24, 2013 10:55 PM

Just in time for Industry!

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:52 PM

intensive or extensive agriculture? Why?

Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Video Guide

Climate Change Video Guide | Geography | Scoop.it
An in-depth, multimedia look at climate change, its global impact, and efforts to combat it.

 

This guide on climate change from the Council on Foreign Relations (independent think tank) covers many of the geopolitical, economic and environmental issues that confront the Earth as global temperatures rise.  Rather than produce a full length feature film, they have organized the this as an interactive video, allowing the user to get short (a couple of minutes) answer to specific questions about the science, foreign policy or economic ramifications of adapting to climate change. 

 

Tags: climate change, environmental adaption, economic, industry.


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, November 27, 2012 8:21 AM
Thanks for sharing this Giovanni!!
Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, November 27, 2012 8:38 AM
Thanks to you, Seth! :-)
Jose Sepulveda's comment, January 13, 2013 8:58 AM
Very good information, Thanks!
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

The Human and Natural World

While I do enjoy this video, it is especially interesting in in how it conceptualizes the world in the two frames.  Urban, human, civilized society on one side, with natural, unsettled wilderness on the other.  The video attempts to bridge the divide, hoping that more people will see more interconnections between the human/urban world and the natural/wildlife world.  While geographers recognize that all elements of the planet are interconnected, most people still think of the world through dichotomies such as these: civilization vs. wilderness, cultural vs. natural and human vs. animal.  How do these terms shape our thinking about the world?     


Via Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Dramatic Greenland Ice Melt

Scientists capture dramatic footage of Arctic glaciers melting in hours Scientists have captured dramatic footage of massive lakes in the Arctic melting away...

 

An amazingly extreme place that is far removed from inhabited regions of our planet, but still heavily impacted by people nonetheless.  


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 10:10 PM
It shows us how humanity impacts the planet wherever we are
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Clean Water for All

A community in Bonsaaso, Ghana learns that their local water supply contains unsafe mineral concentrations. See how they implement a filtration system design...

 

Ghana is one of the more stable nations in the region, and yet even it has serious issues with fresh water. This video shows how low-tech solutions can combat the tainting of water by environmental factors such as mineral contamination of water sources. The $5,000 price tag for such technology seems high, but is very affordable considering the benefits given.  Another organization working on this issue is: http://waterwellsforafrica.org/


Via McDerder, Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere

If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere | Geography | Scoop.it
If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere, from the USGS Water Science School...

 

"This picture shows the size of a sphere that would contain all of Earth's water in comparison to the size of the Earth. The blue sphere sitting on the United States, reaching from about Salt Lake City, Utah to Topeka, Kansas, has a diameter of about 860 miles (about 1,385 kilometers) , with a volume of about 332,500,000 cubic miles (1,386,000,000 cubic kilometers). The sphere includes all the water in the oceans, seas, ice caps, lakes and rivers as well as groundwater, atmospheric water, and even the water in you, your dog, and your tomato plant."

 

The sphere does not include the potential water that some scientists believe may be trapped in the mantle (and thus not accessible on the surface).  For more about water that is not on or near the surface, see: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gary Robertson's comment, May 7, 2012 9:36 PM
Water is also tied up in hydrated minerals in the rocks of the earth's crust. While not "free" it is still significant and is occasionally freed through subduction and volcanic activity. Furthermore, the earth's mantle may contain even more water than the rest combined! So, maybe the Single Sphere should be larger by more than the cube root of 2, or about 1,083 miles in diameter. See mantle water data at http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html
Seth Dixon's comment, May 7, 2012 11:08 PM
Thanks Green Uncle Mary! I mean Mean Uncle Gary!
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

The Sargasso Sea

The Sargasso Sea | Geography | Scoop.it

Located entirely within the Atlantic Ocean, is the only sea without a land boundary (nice little trivia tidbit--Its shifting borders are defined by ocean currents).  So if these waters are a part of the Atlantic Ocean, then why do these waters deserve their own name?  What is distinct about the Saragasso Sea? 


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Nat'l Geographic Video -- Hurricanes 101

Find out how hurricanes can be so destructive.

 

Not only will you learn about hurricanes but you can also watch videos about lighting, tornadoes, volcanoes, and overall everything about the weather. These are great videos to use in class when teaching units about natural disasters. These videos are full of great engaging facts.


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
Carly Griffiths's curator insight, May 17, 1:04 AM

I absolutely loved watching these videos. I believe they would be a fantastic resource to show students or for students to use for research when exploring natural disasters. This site provides multiple videos on multiple different disasters. Each video provides great information and facts including, causes, when and where they are most likely to happen, the amount of damage, different sizes and speed and past examples. Each video provides such great visuals and explanation for these natural disasters. Students would be able to gain deep knowledge and understandings to support their research and/or investigation. I am currently in the middle of creating a task for my students using digital technologies such as this and incorporating collaboration through Wikis and blog. I plan to use these videos to further my students knowledge and encourage further exploration on these videos for their research.

Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Where we get our fresh water - Christiana Z. Peppard

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/where-we-get-our-fresh-water-christiana-z-peppard Fresh water accounts for only 2.5% of Earth's water, yet it is ...

Via geographil, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

World Water Day 2013 | Visual.ly

World Water Day 2013 | Visual.ly | Geography | Scoop.it
March 22nd is World Water Day 2013 - with this year's theme being 'Water Cooperation'. Bathshop321 have produced a helpful infographic to explain more

Via geographil, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jye Watson from Lorraine's Water in the World
Scoop.it!

Water: Cooperation or Competition | Visual.ly

Water: Cooperation or Competition | Visual.ly | Geography | Scoop.it
To help promote the International Year of Water Cooperation which is launched this week, we created a diagram which explores the main challenges faced

Via geographil, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.