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"Lost" New England Revealed

"Lost" New England Revealed | Geography | Scoop.it

"New England's woody hills and dales hide a secret—they weren't always forested. Instead, many were once covered with colonial roads and farmsteads."


Via Seth Dixon
John Netherton's insight:

Another great research tool.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, January 8, 2014 10:55 AM

Through the most recent technology, man has been able to discover that wooded areas of New England where once vibrant communities, homesteads and settled communities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 26, 2014 10:44 PM

Thanks to dedicated archeologists and the LiDAR, we can see the creations of a once small, abandoned community in New England. Even through the thick forest, the LiDAR can detect rocks walls and small dirt roads. Hopefully, we can find more of these ancient communities in other areas around the world.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:48 PM

History is revealed with the use of high tech scanners known as  LiDAR's. With the use of these scanners, scholars learn that many areas of New England, including forested areas in Connecticut and Rhode Island, once were farming grounds. These "lost" pieces of history now lead scholars in new directions in dicovering the past, and details to its future.

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Rescooped by John Netherton from Geography Education
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The Mystery House

"In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize. Read the story: http://wunc.org/post/video-whats-inside-house-wade-avenue "


Via Seth Dixon
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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:06 AM

A great introduction to city planning

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/263476645/whats-inside-this-mystery-house-in-north-carolina

 

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 2014 4:11 PM

This short YouTube clip focuses on the Governments creative ways of keeping city planning out of the eyes of everyday people. Not only do these creative ways allow cities to remain unvandalised, but they also eliminate the eye sores of waterplants and towers. I think these ideas are great and allow communities to remain beautiful and inviting. 

Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2014 3:00 PM
This is a really nice example of a respect for the neighborhood. By disguising the building it doesn't create an eyesore in the community but will allow the plant to provide a service to the neighbors. This keeps property values high and the neighbors happy.
Rescooped by John Netherton from Geography Education
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Great Circle Mapper

Great Circle Mapper | Geography | Scoop.it

"The Great Circle Mapper displays maps and computes distances along a geodesic path. It includes an extensive, searchable database of airports and other locations."


Via Seth Dixon
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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 15, 2014 8:31 AM

Cool tool.

matthias brendler's curator insight, January 16, 2014 10:34 AM

Maps Monster am I!

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:59 PM

Because this route from JFK Airport to SYD AUS Airport is not a straight route there are many factors that need to be taken in account because of the overwhelming idea of trade winds and how that affects flight plans and routing for different airways/airlanes.  The plane has to fight against the trafe winds in order to create a specific ETA for the passenger and the flight crue among the plane. This is all dependent upon the trade winds (prevailing and other kinds) transmitting against the plane.

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Global wind conditions

Global wind conditions | Geography | Scoop.it
an animated map of global wind conditions

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2014 9:10 AM

Earlier I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a static rendering of global wind patterns.  This combines the features of both of those resources to provide a mesmerizing digital globe.  Click on the 'earth' icon in the lower righthand corner to customize the display.  

Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:40 PM

Wind...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:07 PM

This animated depiction of the earth and it's global wind conditions  shows that the northern and southern part of the world refelects the same type of wind conditioons where as the "middle" of the world depicts  different types of trade winds. For example, the trade winds and other prevailing winds change throught time in the world as the axis rotates the different wind patterns rotate with them.

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Geography | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

Via Seth Dixon
John Netherton's insight:

Helping interpret the world through mapping.

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Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism. 

Rescooped by John Netherton from Geography Education
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"Lost" New England Revealed

"Lost" New England Revealed | Geography | Scoop.it

"New England's woody hills and dales hide a secret—they weren't always forested. Instead, many were once covered with colonial roads and farmsteads."


Via Seth Dixon
John Netherton's insight:

Another great research tool.

more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, January 8, 2014 10:55 AM

Through the most recent technology, man has been able to discover that wooded areas of New England where once vibrant communities, homesteads and settled communities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 26, 2014 10:44 PM

Thanks to dedicated archeologists and the LiDAR, we can see the creations of a once small, abandoned community in New England. Even through the thick forest, the LiDAR can detect rocks walls and small dirt roads. Hopefully, we can find more of these ancient communities in other areas around the world.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:48 PM

History is revealed with the use of high tech scanners known as  LiDAR's. With the use of these scanners, scholars learn that many areas of New England, including forested areas in Connecticut and Rhode Island, once were farming grounds. These "lost" pieces of history now lead scholars in new directions in dicovering the past, and details to its future.

Rescooped by John Netherton from Geography Education
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Historic USGS Maps of New England & New York

Historic USGS Maps of New England & New York | Geography | Scoop.it
This historical collection of USGS 15 minute topographic maps dates from the 1890s to the 1950s. Geographic coverage is complete for New Hampshire and nearly complete for the rest of New England.

 

This is a great warehouse of historical maps of New England.  The picture above what is today South Providence and Cranston, but in 1894 the area around the lakes was a part of the City of Cranston.  Why would the city of Cranston 'lose' territory?  When did this happen?  This is just one example of the questions in historical geography that this resource can inspire.


Via Seth Dixon
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