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Portland: A Tale of Two Cities

Portland: A Tale of Two Cities | Geography | Scoop.it

"Portland is a city that some residents praise as a kind of eden: full of bike paths, independently-owned small businesses, great public transportation and abundant microbreweries and coffeeshops. And then there’s a whole other city. It’s the city where whole stretches of busy road are missing sidewalks, and you can see folks in wheelchairs rolling themselves down the street right next to traffic. It’s the city where some longtime African-American residents feel as if decades of institutional racism still have not been fully addressed."


Via Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

Recently I came across a craigslist post from a gentleman who was trying to rally individuals to Portland with him for a journey on the "Michigan Trail" to Detroit. He made promise that the intention was to perform rejuvinating work in  Detroit alongside it's current residents and that there would be "no gentrification." 

Not that I found these statements or intentions to be profound or useful in anyway, but this podcast really put a nail in the coffin for me. The effects of gentrification are well known for both their positive and negative aspects. But the bottom line is this, regardless of intention the poor and diverse populations will be displaced unless it is from them that this renaissance takes place. Not Portlandia hipsters looking for some sort of "promise land."  

Portland apparentely has it's own issues with gentrification and a class of social and cultural norms that make it difficult to make the case for cities on the rise to take the same path.  

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 1:11 PM

Portland, Oregon is often discussed as a magnet for a young demographic that wants to be part of a sustainable city that supports local businesses and agriculture.  This podcast looks behind that image (which has a measure of truth to it) to see another story.  Relining, gentrification, poverty, governance and urban planning are all prominent topics in this 50 minute podcast that provides as fascinating glimpse into the poorer neighborhoods of this intriguing West Coast city.  When in cities, we often use the term sustainability to refer to the urban ecology, but here we see a strong concern for the social sustainability of their historic neighborhoods as well. 


Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic, racepovertyplace, socioeconomic.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:12 PM

I don't think that Earth offers everything for everyone.  Given the situation of predetermination about birthplace and essentially upbringing, social class, and outcomes, in an infinite universe (infinite until proven otherwise), a single small planet cannot possibly offer us everything we are destined to need in the universe, let alone the towns that we are limited to.  I do not believe in choice, I believe in destiny... I do not blame people for racism or crimes, as HORRIBLE as they may be. I think that people are made into what they are by the world around them, in existential and defining ways.  Yeah, there is plenty of room for improvement and change in Oregon, but realistically, there is also more room for improvement in other areas too.  I don't really see humans as the sort of people that will ever get better without some sort of divine intervention.  I am taking the perspective of separation of paradise and purgatory that was mentioned in this article, and applying it to a different scale, but I do believe that mankind is to be condemned by the universe, due to its faults and inability to play well with others.  The world freaks out when kidnapping victims are found after a decade of abuse and captivity, but this same world breeds animals for slaughter and consumption... Earthlings clearly have been taught to not care about those that are different, whether in looks or species... I think the kidnapping situation is vile and appalling, but I also think that breeding species for slaughter (which affects more living beings) is democratically more of an issue.

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U.S. Obesity Trends

U.S. Obesity Trends | Geography | Scoop.it

It's pretty widely known that Americans are becoming increasingly more obese...but there is a geographic context to this phenomenon.  These maps help students explore these factors.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 18, 2012 3:01 PM
According to this map obesity occurs all over but is more highly concentrated in the South and Mid West area such as Illinios and Michican. While states in the heartland have no "recorded data" and thus there trying to say they are not obese. I think this map is biased and not accurate because it's implied message is that Americans are not truly obese.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 9:15 PM

The section about obesity and socioeconomic status was the most interesting to me, specifically that richer non-Hispanic blacks are more likely to be obese than their poorer counterparts while wealtheir women tend to be skinnier than poorer women. I've always understood obesity to be a problem largely driven by the nutrition of low-cost foods (McDonalds, KFC, etc.) yet these two statistics seem to contradict each other and require I take a more nuanced look at the epidemic. The fact that the South and the Midwest are leading the data in most obese does not come as a surprise to me. Stereotypes of Southern fried chicken and biscuits are coming to mind while my own experience of the Minnesota State Fair (everything on a stick!) makes the statistics jive with my own mindset. 

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Bike Lanes


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Sofia Speranza's curator insight, October 10, 2013 2:10 PM

BIKERS. be aware of dangers on the street path

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:27 AM

I find this to be very true. I have gone to big cities such as Boston and New York and it is always chaotic. I find that there is always terrible parking in the big cities. Also it seems very dangerous for the average civilian trying to get to his or her job on a daily basis. Me not being from around the area found it difficult to navigate.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:45 PM

Bikers in New York City should know better not to ride their bikes around the streets because it is so busy and the traffic can be difficult. I know people use bikes to commute to work or school but this is New Yorks job to create more bike paths for people who want to use their bikes to commute. This will be safer for people to ride their bikes whenever they want. 

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The next small thing: How sustainable neighborhoods could reshape cities

The next small thing: How sustainable neighborhoods could reshape cities | Geography | Scoop.it
Residents and planners around the country are dreaming up innovative ways to create eco-friendly, self-reliant communities. But turning ideas into reality is a tall order.

 

Urban revitalization projects gentrification have been an important part of the American scene since the 1990s.  As we reconsider the city, and some of the associated issues with dense living, many are also thinking about the environmental impact of urban life and rethinking how to make neighborhoods more sustainable.  This article uses the Denver Lower Downtown (LoDo) neighborhood as its case study for analyzing sustainability with the city.  


Via Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

Here we have the perfect example of the positive effects associated with gentrification. Unused and weathering space being revitalized and re-purposed for the benefit of local economy and communitites. Not only that but the intention of these projects is to also operate in an ecologically sustainable manner by using as little resources as possible. The occupation of mill space is something that's even been seen here in Providence, most notably the hope artiste building in Pawtucket on the Providence line.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:38 PM

I have totally thought about this before, and a family that I know just spent the past several months remodeling their house to be more 'green.'  I think that in addition to energy, neighborhoods could have community grow-ops, where they grow all the necessary crops to sustain their area- fruits, vegetables, grains, cotton, etc. and I think that the communities would be cleaner, greener, and brought more together if they had the opportunity to work every day to provide for themselves and their community.  I miss out on a lot of enjoyment in life because I have to do things like school.  Other people miss out because they have work, or other obligations.  I think that if people farmed as communities, it would be economically, environmentally, and socially proficuous, as well as eliminating a need for capitalistic trade with other regions, where people might get cheated.  I have so many ideas of Utopia that I have gotten from reading and philosophizing with friends and acquaintences, but there really are so few people that have the ability to implement anything on a large scale, that I am often frustrated with these concepts of 'betterment.'  It really is sad that people are taught so much these days, because their brains are full of garbage, rather than new possibilities.  It would be really interesting to have an experimental colony where these ideas of sustainability could be tried out, but I think that will happen long after my generation has died.

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Detroit on the edge

Detroit on the edge | Geography | Scoop.it
Bob Simon reports on the decline of America's former industrial capital and the people determined to bring it back

Via Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

The Detroit "Renaissance"  is an interesting one to say the least. There is an obvious opportunity to lay the foundations for something new and bold after clearing the rubble that has become detroit. But who is going to be displaced once the rubble's cleared and the trendy cafes, art studios, and co-ops are erected? Who amongst the poor and already displaced will be held up high, encouraged, and supported to help create this new Detroit? Cutting costs from health care and pensions, from those who already live in this city and are struggling, doesn't sound particularly productive. Especially after referencing having posession of extremely valuable art pieces that could be sold off. This article really sheds a light on the pro's and con's that are associated in capital investment in a bankrupt and wartorn American city.

I don't think that the poor and hungry care about paint on a canvas. They need access to opportunity and the resources to seize it.

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2013 8:32 PM

Detroit is the largest city to declare bankruptcy and more importantly the first major American city to essentially fail as a major metropolitan area.  Sections of the city are reminiscent of a post-apocalyptic bestselling novel:  80,000 buildings stand empty, 40% of the streetlights don’t work, and it routinely takes police one hour to respond to a 911 call.


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit

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Report: Meat Producers Ignore Pleas For Health, Environmental Reform

Report: Meat Producers Ignore Pleas For Health, Environmental Reform | Geography | Scoop.it
A commission evaluating the impacts of animal agriculture says the industry has resisted change.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

There are tremendous environmental and public health hazards as a result of loose regulations surrounding industrial meat production. Increasingly these issues have been brought to light from activist groups and many people want change. There has been an immense pushback from these industrial meat producers through various campaign initiatives and throwing money at politicians. There is only so long that these agriculture giants can resist change when more and more people are realizing the blight on the landscape and therefor on their dinner tables that this industry has created.

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Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont

Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont | Geography | Scoop.it
Lawmakers in Vermont are looking to regulate food labels so customers can know which products are made from genetically modified crops, but agricultural giants Monsanto say they will sue if the state follows through.

Via Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:



Vermont has a strong agricultural history and allot of their local economy is based off of their agricultural movement, which has been trending towards sustainable and organic growing methods. The people of Vermont care very much where their food comes from and what is in their food, hence the push for GMO labeling. I think other states would absolutely follow suit if Vermont wins it's case against the agri-business giant monsanto, but that's a big IF. I think that if there were labeling all across the US either these companies would drastically change their business models or ship them overseas to developing nations that have food security issues of their own,  

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Michelle Gentry's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:35 PM

ugh

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 6:40 PM

I don’t think that there is a specific reason on why  Vermont is the first state to make some headway in producing this type of legislation, Vermont used to pride themselves on being one of the states with a large numbers of organic farms. And with a company like Monsanto whom use GMO on their product, it doesn’t go well with Vermont image. I do think that other states will follow suit because using Genetically Modified Organisms(GMO) and Genetically Engineered (GE) affect our help and Vermont cannot fight this big corporation by themselves. I feel that even though requiring labels on products that contain GMO is a good thing for us the consumers to know Exactly  what we are giving to ur family. I do think that is going to be a bad impact. because this big corporations like Monsanto is a good source of employment for the states. If they feel that the can make their product, they are going to take their business else where.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, February 27, 11:30 AM

If monsanto can win a course a battle saying they don't have to represent their GMO's on products, then they will be able to win in other places which will further murk up the waters of GMO presentation.

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Meanwhile, In A Small Kingdom Called Denmark, The Citizens Were Happy, Healthy, And On Time To Work

Meanwhile, In A Small Kingdom Called Denmark, The Citizens Were Happy, Healthy, And On Time To Work | Geography | Scoop.it
Denmark probably doesn’t want us to see this data, because we’d all move to Copenhagen.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

Denmark is a wonderful example of a city thanks acts with reason and thinks ahead. Urban development, Ecological Sustainabiliy and Communal Responsibilities are their priorities. There is allot about
Denmark that we here in the US should learn from and emulate.

 

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13 moments of culture shock for the first-time American traveler

13 moments of culture shock for the first-time American traveler | Geography | Scoop.it
Hilarious and startling, this will be a huge reality check for most. I've yet to be out of the country and I really need to get on understanding the conversion of weight and distance!
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Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:53 PM

This is highly entertaining, somewhat offesive, yet all true! Americans are brought up on large portions of food, large vehicles, and large egos. We all think that we are fully enlightened about the worlds' other cultures and we could not be more wrong. It amazes me to think that just south of the U.S. lies Mexico, who touches us in land but is a whole different world. Maybe in the future as more people immigrate to the Americas to start a new life, they will bring some of their new cultures and we can become more educated about the world around us.

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | Geography | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

Via Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

It's really interesting, and puzzling, that instead of immidietely solving this issue (or pushing for it) the city just uses a bandaid so that the tourists still have nice pictures. It shows the disconnect between humans and their environment very clearly and grimly. 

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:16 PM

This picture alone is worth a thousand words, I mean how bad does the pollution have to be that there are actually stands with what the skyline should look like as opposed to the poluted REAL skyline behind it. This is insane that this is an actual exhibit. Thats like putting a cardboard cut out of the Effile Tower or Big Ben and saying it is the same thing, when next to eachother their is a real clear difference.  It has me thinking is this what we all will have to resort to when pollution and other drastic changes happen, to recreate an image?

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 6:38 PM

This is just wrong in so many ways. Instead of acknowledging that there is a serious problem causing untold health problems for the population of Hong Kong, they just put up a pretty picture to distract everyone. How is that going to help the city?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:29 PM

This is cool. Why not take a fake picture of the beautiful background? Maybe because the background is actually filled with so much smog you can barely see it.

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5 Stupidest Things Ever Done With Borders

5 Stupidest Things Ever Done With Borders | Geography | Scoop.it

Where you find a border, you usually find somebody pissed off about it.

Disclaimer: This article is more glib and crude in its language than I typically post.  However there is some great insight in this article about the curiosities that can occur on the borders that merits inclusion here.  Enclaves, walls, roads, glaciers, and tables all play prominent roles in these 5 quirky borders. 


Via Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

Within this article the author said it well, referencing that although these borders just seem silly and "stupid" to us, those who live within these boundaries must have an incredibly frustrating life. Having to hop three-four borders to get to the mainland of your country sounds completely crazy. I'm glad I live in Rhode Island.

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Ms. Harrington's comment, July 24, 2012 6:48 PM
Wow, I never knew border issues like this existed! Some are strange, but they live with the issue, like Canusa and the Netherlands/Belgium. Some are high tension, like Pakistan and India. I guess some of these issues are inevitable, the border has to go somewhere, and people over hundreds of years have moved outward.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 25, 2012 7:09 PM
Although some of these boarders were established for security reasons, many more like the one along the American boarder seem to be constructed for more symbolic purposes as a physiological rather than a physical barrier.
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5Pointz, a Graffiti Mecca in Queens, Is Wiped Clean Overnight

5Pointz, a Graffiti Mecca in Queens, Is Wiped Clean Overnight | Geography | Scoop.it
A warehouse in Long Island City that for years was a canvas for street artists around the world is scheduled for demolition by the end of the year.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

12 years of angsty urban art wiped clean and scheduled to be demolished. Yet another example of development infringing upon urban culture. 

On the other hand the development is meant to house 71 tenants and also provide space for art-studios. So is it a blessing or a burden on the neighborhood? I suppose that depends on who you ask. But the general consensus is that this event was a sad one, even the owner of the property made claim that he had cried while watching the building be painted over. 

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:21 PM

I am an artist, and I feel that graffiti is a community activity that reflects neighborhoods.  I have friends that tag and I hugely advocate their work, which often reflects abstract portrayal of ideas that relate directly back to our community.  The graffiti artists are the voice of a community that has no other way to speak and be heard.  I have been offered to tag with some friends up in Boston, but I didn't have a ride...  Back in high school, I used to do graffiti tags on blank pieces of paper, along with my own poetry and abstract art that I created and drew, and hide them places in the school... I got quite an audience, and people even left me notes back (with praise, questions about philosophy, the universe, meanings of life, etc. as well as their own art and writings) in my usual spots, people that I would have never met otherwise.  That system was a hell of a lot better (and less detention-prone) than spraypainting walls of the school or carving on desks... I would suggest that the public open up an art commune, where people can freely come and paint art, post art, work on collaborations, and live the Art life that so many people would benefit from even experiencing by viewing.  I am an artist, and I love the idea of publically displaying art, and I think that if this way were to come about occurring at a city-level, it would sooth the souls of turbulent spirits- both artists and passersby.  I am working on some paintings... maybe I'll give them away at campus when I finish?  I think art is the greatest gift within the capacity of a human to give, and can shape a community by allowing its voice to be heard.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 7, 2013 8:53 PM

Unfortunately the fact that this building being torn down and repainted does not surprise me at all. The world is becoming more and more urbanized. Personally I have a lot of mixed feelings about this. It is sad to see the work of so many artists destroyed. Also I don't really understand why everything needed to be painted over if the building is just going to be torn down anyway. I think there could have been something done to try and perserve the art work. However on a positive note, by building these apartments it will create a lot more homes and studios for artists. The builders also intend to create a wall for graffiti artists to use. However that won't replace what has already been destroyed. Authentic culture is becoming less and less important to people as the world becomes more and more urbanized, which is why this incident is not surpising at all. 

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Portland: A Tale of Two Cities

Portland: A Tale of Two Cities | Geography | Scoop.it

"Portland is a city that some residents praise as a kind of eden: full of bike paths, independently-owned small businesses, great public transportation and abundant microbreweries and coffeeshops. And then there’s a whole other city. It’s the city where whole stretches of busy road are missing sidewalks, and you can see folks in wheelchairs rolling themselves down the street right next to traffic. It’s the city where some longtime African-American residents feel as if decades of institutional racism still have not been fully addressed."


Via Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

Recently I came across a craigslist post from a gentleman who was trying to rally individuals to Portland with him for a journey on the "Michigan Trail" to Detroit. He made promise that the intention was to perform rejuvinating work in  Detroit alongside it's current residents and that there would be "no gentrification." 

Not that I found these statements or intentions to be profound or useful in anyway, but this podcast really put a nail in the coffin for me. The effects of gentrification are well known for both their positive and negative aspects. But the bottom line is this, regardless of intention the poor and diverse populations will be displaced unless it is from them that this renaissance takes place. Not Portlandia hipsters looking for some sort of "promise land."  

Portland apparentely has it's own issues with gentrification and a class of social and cultural norms that make it difficult to make the case for cities on the rise to take the same path.  

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 1:11 PM

Portland, Oregon is often discussed as a magnet for a young demographic that wants to be part of a sustainable city that supports local businesses and agriculture.  This podcast looks behind that image (which has a measure of truth to it) to see another story.  Relining, gentrification, poverty, governance and urban planning are all prominent topics in this 50 minute podcast that provides as fascinating glimpse into the poorer neighborhoods of this intriguing West Coast city.  When in cities, we often use the term sustainability to refer to the urban ecology, but here we see a strong concern for the social sustainability of their historic neighborhoods as well. 


Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic, racepovertyplace, socioeconomic.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:12 PM

I don't think that Earth offers everything for everyone.  Given the situation of predetermination about birthplace and essentially upbringing, social class, and outcomes, in an infinite universe (infinite until proven otherwise), a single small planet cannot possibly offer us everything we are destined to need in the universe, let alone the towns that we are limited to.  I do not believe in choice, I believe in destiny... I do not blame people for racism or crimes, as HORRIBLE as they may be. I think that people are made into what they are by the world around them, in existential and defining ways.  Yeah, there is plenty of room for improvement and change in Oregon, but realistically, there is also more room for improvement in other areas too.  I don't really see humans as the sort of people that will ever get better without some sort of divine intervention.  I am taking the perspective of separation of paradise and purgatory that was mentioned in this article, and applying it to a different scale, but I do believe that mankind is to be condemned by the universe, due to its faults and inability to play well with others.  The world freaks out when kidnapping victims are found after a decade of abuse and captivity, but this same world breeds animals for slaughter and consumption... Earthlings clearly have been taught to not care about those that are different, whether in looks or species... I think the kidnapping situation is vile and appalling, but I also think that breeding species for slaughter (which affects more living beings) is democratically more of an issue.

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A Fight Over Vineyards Pits Redwoods Against Red Wine

A Fight Over Vineyards Pits Redwoods Against Red Wine | Geography | Scoop.it
Climate change prompts California's wine industry to creep toward the coast, where redwoods grow.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

This is a very interesting artice about a lawsuit from environmental activitist organisations and the state of California. California approved the cutting down of "154 acres of coast redwoods and Douglas firs to make way for grapevines." The Redwoods in California are a coveted species, esteemed for their potential to live thousands of years and reach tremendous heights. Most of the trees in this lot aren't over 50 years old and have only reached heights of about 80 feet. Which, mind you, is still taller than most trees in the state of Rhode Island. 

This is a very heated debate, are these wineries encroaching on land that should be preserved? One could very easily argue that the tearing down of forested land for the production of alcohol is rash and irresponsible. The outcome of this trial should set a president on what can be considered agricultural land once re-growth has occured. 

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What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Geography | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, locavore, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

I love the hard facts that this article presents, in a very unbiased way. I've heard many claims from 'both sides of the aisle' about GE crops, but have never in one article seen such a clear and concise representation on the actual truths (or myths) surrounding the GMO debate.  

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David Ricci's comment, April 16, 2013 10:28 AM
As i read this article I tried to keep an open mind and not choose a side. I wanted to take all of the information presented to see the pros and cons that are related to GE foods. After finishing my reading it seems to me that the debate revolves around whether or not these crops and foods are bad for you. If they are bad, then do the pros outway the cons? I can say that after reading the article I dont feel much more educated on the topic. There seems to be a large grey area covering GE crops. The only people who know the full extent of these projects are the people in charge and the government. With the information that i have gained today though, i can say that GE crops have the potential to be extremely benefitial aroud the world. Many places that have trouble growing crops can use GE crops that withstand bugs and even climate. These benefits can help with cost minimalization in areas that need it, potentially creating better and more farming in areas around the world that need it. GE crops if regulated properly can atleast for a time have a global effect on food and agriculture. A jump in production of crops can help economies and help the general wellbeing of countries that have trouble producing even close to the right amount of food for the people living there.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:04 PM
An interesting article to read, it talked about the genetically modified seeds and food that is created by companies and then grown by American and other farmers worldwide. This article relates to the globalization point that we talked about in class. The seeds are genetically modified here or elsewhere in the world and then sent to farmers all over the globe to grow for increased profit typically. Many countries around the world, especially third world countries, have food shortages and by genetically modifying food so that farmers can get a bigger harvest, more people will be fed and less would die to famine and malnutrition. Like David, I tried to keep an open mind and not choose a side while I was reading. The article did seem quite vague regarding argument points however it gave facts left and right which I found to be new to me and fairly interesting, learning that 70% of food that we eat has at least one GE ingredient. Time will tell if this has prolonged pros/cons I suppose.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:59 PM

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

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Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts'

Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts' | Geography | Scoop.it
Baruch Ben-Yehudah is tackling Prince George’s County’s "food desert" problem. His vegan food truck delivers nourishment to neighborhoods lacking fresh groceries.

Via Natalie K Jensen, Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

This food truck is bringing healthy, vegan food, to food deserts. A food desert is a place where healthy food is not accesable to the population, which is always impoverished. These people typically rely on unhealthy/cheap foods that are high in fats, preservatives, and sugars. This leads to tremendous health issues for these populations. Sure, this food truck is making a profit but it is also providing a wonderful service to the community, exposure to healthy foods and an alternative to the norm.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 2013 4:49 PM

What are food deserts?  Why do they form?  What does this Washington Post video suggest about the demographic composition of food deserts?


TagsWashington DC, agriculture, food, urban, povertyplace, socioeconomic.

nicole Musset's curator insight, September 14, 2013 1:55 PM

la terre peut offrir de la nourriture à tous ses habitants;mais les interets personnels,la recherche de profits et l'absence de plus en plus grande de conscience "écolologique"....une personne comme Baruch Ben Yehuda est tres importante pour ceux qui souffrent du manque de ressources.

Patricia Stitson's curator insight, September 20, 2013 10:38 PM

After having just driven across country this year I am very in touch with the fact that this model needs to be replicated across the US.

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Ban cars from town centres to save our shops, says transport minister - Telegraph

Ban cars from town centres to save our shops, says transport minister - Telegraph | Geography | Scoop.it
Cars should be banned from high streets to help shops and encourage more people to walk, cycle and use public transport, a minister has suggested.

Via David Mainwood / EFL SMARTblog
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

I've heard about this before and have read up on it's implications in Germany. By banning cars from city centers you put the priority in the pedestrian and take away the humility of having to walk through a street or an entire shopping district crowded by cars. Can you imagine a car-less Thayer st? A car-less Wickenden? How about Down-town Providence on the whole? All it would really take is more parking Garages on the outskirts of the city. Walking, riding your bicycle, and taking the bus would become much easier, more convienient and even exciting! Without the danger of being rolled over by a big metal death machine....

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When Google Earth Goes Awry

When Google Earth Goes Awry | Geography | Scoop.it

"These jarring moments expose how Google Earth works, focusing our attention on the software. They reveal a new model of representation: not through indexical photographs but through automated data collection from a myriad of different sources constantly updated and endlessly combined to create a seamless illusion; Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation. These uncanny images focus our attention on that process itself, and the network of algorithms, computers, storage systems, automated cameras, maps, pilots, engineers, photographers, surveyors and map-makers that generate them.”


Via Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

I understand that this article mostly depicts the inherent limitations with our current technology within GIS systems but I mostly just found these images to be eerily and awkwardly beautiful. Art made accidentely. Thank-you flawed technology.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 23, 2013 11:06 AM

The quote above from Clement Valla shows some of the problems with trusting too completely in a form of technology if you are not sure how it works or what its limitations are.  What does he mean when he says "Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation?"  What does this have to do with the term metadata?   


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art, google.

Mary Rack's curator insight, August 26, 2013 10:10 AM

This post represents a "sub-issue" which underlies many of today's  decisions: How much "information" is really a composite of items that may or may not be related? And how many of our decisions are based on those constructs? As a result, are we liviing in a "house of cards", a fantasy world that is sure to collapse around us one day? It's a scary thought. 

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We kill and we forget

We kill and we forget | Geography | Scoop.it

An infamous power plant operates near the site where Native Americans were massacred. We must stop burying our past

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s insight:

This article links climate change and the slaughter of New Englands Native American population by looking at the geographic development of our region. This is an extremely narrative article with much insight into our past and how it grimly reflects our current situation.

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