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New geography A-levels delayed in fears over standards - Telegraph.co.uk

New geography A-levels delayed in fears over standards - Telegraph.co.uk | Geography | Scoop.it
Telegraph.co.uk
New geography A-levels delayed in fears over standards
Telegraph.co.uk
A planned overhaul of geography A-levels has been delayed by a year after experts warned that the qualification was not yet "fit for purpose".
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The geography of the Atlantic Ocean - by Jose Juan Gutierrez - Helium

The geography of the Atlantic Ocean - by Jose Juan Gutierrez - Helium | Geography | Scoop.it
The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean in the world, encompassing approximately 29 percent of the total water contained on the surface of ..., Jose Juan Gutierrez (The #Atlantic #Ocean isecond largest ocean in the #World #Mid Atlantic Ridge...
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Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side

Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side | Geography | Scoop.it
Though he never actually crossed it, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras is sometimes credited with having first conceived of the Equator, calculating its location on the Earth’s sphere more than four centuries before the birth of Christ.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 24, 2013 7:48 AM

This is an interesting article on some Earth-Sun relationships that challenges the dominant north-centered normative view of how to think about our planet.  My favorite tidbit of information: "The velocity of the Earth’s rotation varies depending on where you stand: 1,000 mph at the Equator versus almost zero at the poles. That means that the fastest sunrises and sunsets on the planet occur on the Equator, and centrifugal and inertial forces are also much greater there. "

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's comment, May 24, 2013 11:09 AM
Great article to include in our summer assignment packet!
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:42 PM

Definitly changed my way of thinking. also this brings up the many flaws with pre geospatial desinged maps. cartographers could push their own agenda to make their country or area look more promient than it actually is. also another prime example of something that has been taken as fact for many years (nobody questions a world map) and turns out to have some flaws

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Exploring BioBlitz Geography on FieldScope – News Watch

Exploring BioBlitz Geography on FieldScope – News Watch | Geography | Scoop.it
This is the seventh annual National Geographic BioBlitz, conducted in partnership with the National Park Service. It's been done in the mountains, on a lakeshore, in an urban park, on a key, and in the desert.
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Free Online Mapping Course


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 9, 2013 8:58 AM

This podcast explains the MOOC Maps and the Geospatial Revolution.  It is designed to be an easy on-ramp to 21st century geospatial tools and any geography teacher hoping to modernize their skillset would do well to take this summer course from the Program of Online Geospatial Education at Penn State, taught by Dr. Anthony Robinson.  Click here to register for free.   


Tags: GIS, teacher training, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Mass Wasting

Mass Wasting | Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 2013 9:07 AM

A steep slope and unstable ground in this picture from Egypt results in mass wasting and the 'flow' of the sand down the slope.  Sand dunes are often formed more by aeolian (wind) processes, making this image especially noteworthy.

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Claudia M. Reder's curator insight, May 22, 2013 12:30 PM

Strange happenings.

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Belonging to this place: A conversation with Yi-Fu Tuan

Belonging to this place: A conversation with Yi-Fu Tuan | Geography | Scoop.it

Humanist geography, a movement within the field of human geography (itself a sub-field of geography) arose in the 1970s as a way to counter what humanists saw as a tendency to treat places as mere sites or locations. Instead, a humanist geographer would argue, the places we inhabit have as many personalities as those whose lives have intersected with them. And the stories we tell about places often say as much about who we are, as about where our feet are planted.


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Romana Quintel's curator insight, May 14, 2013 12:05 AM

An interesting way to view Aboriginal people's link to country.

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, May 14, 2013 9:38 AM

Articulo que introduce a la obra del geógrafo humanista Yi-Fu Tuan, uno de los 21 historiadores para el siglo XXI que José Enrique Ruiz-Domènec seleccionó en su libro Rostros para la historia

Céline's curator insight, May 26, 2013 7:25 AM

Le géographe sino américain a joué un rôle décisif dans l'essor du point de vue humaniste dans la nouvelle géographie. C'est l'un des premiers à avoir 

étudié l'expérience que les hommes se font des lieux (à travers plusieurs ouvrages : Topophilia, 1974 ; Espace et Lieu. La perspective de l'expérience, 1977 ; Segmented Worlds and Self, 1982).

Yi-Fu Tuan s'est vu décerné le prix international de géographie Vautrin Lud 2012, considéré comme le «prix Nobel de géographie». Ce prix lui a été remis de la 23e édition du Festival international de géographie (FIG) de Saint-Dié-des-Vosges.

 

En 2002, Tuan dit de sa géographie humaniste qu’elle «doit attirer celui qui a l’esprit solide et se montre idéaliste, car elle repose en définitive sur la croyance que nous, les hommes, avons à faire face aux faits les plus déplaisants, et parvenir dans le même temps à faire quelque chose à leur sujet, sans désespérer».

Pour le géographe Paul Claval, il est «une personnalité hors du commun, un être attachant» auteur d’une «œuvre inclassable tant elle est originale par sa forme et son contenu» (revue «la Géographie»).

 

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Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma

Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma | Geography | Scoop.it
Explore the Bing map, or Google map of Moore, Okla. More on the Oklahoma tornado:

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Justin McCullough's curator insight, September 18, 2013 9:03 PM

The before and after images in this picture are insane. Living on the east coast it's hard to picture losing your home (your whole life) in a matter of mere seconds or minutes. It is really sad to see pictures such as these, and even more devastating to see the families affected by this with looks of disbelief. However, what is encouraging to see from tragedies such as these, is the community helping each other regardless of whatever background a person may have. Unfortunately it is moments like these that force people to help others without the thought of asking or seeking some sort of favor in return.  

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:37 PM

I look at these pictures and I can't help but feel bad for the people that were apart of this tornado. In minutes your whole life can change. The picture of the corner house there before the tornado and afterwards nothing, your whole life changed. I couldn't imagine the heartbreak these families went through, loosing everything. 

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, February 24, 6:18 PM

2013 bit some may not have recovered Oklahoma