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Brain drain: Advocates fear shutdown could spook best and brightest

Brain drain: Advocates fear shutdown could spook best and brightest | Geography | Scoop.it
Could a government shutdown be making the federal government dumber?

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Barron's AP Human Geography Flash Cards (Barron's: the Leader in Test Preparation): Meredith Marsh M.A., Peter S. Alagona Ph.D.: 9780764195983: Amazon.com: Books

Barron's AP Human Geography Flash Cards (Barron's: the Leader in Test Preparation) [Meredith Marsh M.A., Peter S. Alagona Ph.D.] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers.
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The College, Career & Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards

The College, Career & Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards | Geography | Scoop.it
The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: State guidance for enhancing the rigor of K-12 civics, economics, geography, and history

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Analyze The Impact Of Intra-Regional Migration On The African Development Bank

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Mexico Uxpanapa, an example of forced migration | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico

Mexico Uxpanapa, an example of forced migration | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | Geography | Scoop.it

Almost all internal migration in Mexico in recent history has been voluntary.... However, there have been some cases of forced migration, where the inhabitants of a village or area have been made to move away in order to make way for large-scale infrastructure projects such as reservoirs, tourism resorts and hotel complexes...


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Achieving Environmentally Sustainable Prosperity by Shann Turnbull :: SSRN

Achieving Environmentally Sustainable Prosperity by Shann Turnbull :: SSRN | Geography | Scoop.it

The contribution of this paper is to explain how to achieve a universally prosperous environmentally sustainable global society. This objective is incompatible with traditional economic policies dependent on environmentally exploitive growth in the population and/or full employment to generate prosperity. Politically attractive incentives of smaller taxes and government are identified as a way of changing the way an economy operates so that prosperity can be increased even with a declining and aging population. Localising the ownership and control of the means of production and exchange with individuals creates a way to create a universal minimum social dividend to replace the need for full employment, welfare, pensions, and big government. Local democracy is enriched with the power to nurture their host environment. The introduction of ecological forms of cost carrying money redeemable into local services of nature allows market forces to encourage production techniques that reduce their environmental impact. Increased life expectancy with depopulation is already occurring in twenty countries and this is expected to spread globally in the current century. This phenomenon with current environmental pressures create an imperative for achieving environmentally sustainable prosperity sooner rather than later. 

 


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Informit - Joining the Dots Research Briefings - Shifting students: Regional mobility of undergraduates in Australia (Humanities & Social Sciences Collection)

Informit - Joining the Dots Research Briefings - Shifting students: Regional mobility of undergraduates in Australia (Humanities & Social Sciences Collection) | Geography | Scoop.it

Abstract: This Joining the Dots (JTD) Research Briefing explores the mobility of university students in Australia using Census data to track the movement of current students over a five year period. The data captured in this analysis provide a unique insight into the mobility of the student population in Australia, and allow us to examine the potential impact of internal migration on student populations in Australia.full text : http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=406275861328669;res=IELHSS


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Demographic Transition | Lab 207

Demographic Transition | Lab 207 | Geography | Scoop.it
Demographic Transition. by Mr. Kite on Sep 16, 2013 • 10:56 am No Comments. Tags: demographic transition · Previous postDrivers of Population Growth Next postAffluence and Environmental Impact. What do you think?
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MIGRATION: Migrants, asylum seekers re-route to avoid Greece - IRINnews.org

MIGRATION: Migrants, asylum seekers re-route to avoid Greece - IRINnews.org | Geography | Scoop.it
MIGRATION: Migrants, asylum seekers re-route to avoid Greece IRINnews.org THESSALONIKI/ISTANBUL, 10 October 2013 (IRIN) - Dire economic conditions, increased security measures, inflated trafficking fees, and the fear of xenophobic violence are...
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The Voices of Pratham Institute: The push and pull of skilling

The Voices of Pratham Institute: The push and pull of skilling | Geography | Scoop.it
The government and the eager trainers represent the push factor which is trying to create processes and institutions for training, without a strong pull factor. It is my considered opinion that the game-plan has to change ...
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Medical Revolution: “Social media is just New Age word of mouth.”

Medical Revolution: “Social media is just New Age word of mouth.” | Geography | Scoop.it

It used to be that when you got sick, you made an appointment with your doctor, waited a few days – sometimes six weeks or longer, depending on your complaint – and after a 10-minute consultation during which the doctor did most of the talking, you obediently complied with whatever orders had been directed your way. 

 

That’s so  early 2000s.

 

Now doctors and patients are collaborating to create the best healthcare experience possible, as explained by a host of speakers presenting at Stanford’s MedicineX Conference this past weekend. Panelists agreed that today’s so-called “e-patient” – which can be translated as empowered patient, engaged patient or electronic patient – can provide the passion, day-to-day communication, community and love needed to make the difference between surviving with a chronic illness and thriving with one.

 

“My life is now a before and after, and social media is the dividing line in that life,” said Emily Bradley, who at 17 was diagnosed with a rare form of juvenile-onset rheumatoid arthritis called Still’s Disease. Now 21, she is the founder of Chronic Curve, an online discussion group for young adults suffering chronic illness and pain. Through chat groups, Twitter, Facebook and additional social media Bradley has discovered promising new data about her illness and has found others who can empathize with her experiences.

 

Fellow panelist Jody Schoger, a breast cancer survivor and moderator of #BCSM (breast cancer social media), likened the support of patient networks to that of dolphins and whales working together. “If one of them is wounded or suffering, the others come up and carry him or her along,” she said. “We think of ourselves as the message bearers to the next person diagnosed with the disease.”

 

Erin Moore, mother of a young boy with cystic fibrosis, said the collaboration within a disease community can save lives. Too often, she said, she has discovered vital information outside the medical clinic. “Social media,” she said, “is just New Age word of mouth.”

 

The medical community is taking note of the efforts of this new, connected patient. Cardiac surgeon Marc Katz of Richmond, Virginia, has begun to ask every patient prior to ending a visit: “Did I get it?” It’s a question that can be mined deeply for empathy, he said. “I’ve learned about the bravery and courage it takes to a be a patient facing a serious illness,” he said. “It is the patient who suffers the consequences of whatever decision the physician makes.”

 

Getting patients and doctors to collaborate in healthcare is not a new topic for the annual Medicine X conference, but there’s a growing interest in “the quantified self”. Michael Seid, founder of C3N, the Collaborative Chronic Care Network, told the story of his adult daughter diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease. To identify which parts of her diet caused a flare up of the disease, Seid’s daughter began photographing everything she ate, recording how she felt before and after eating it. The family ultimately figured out which foods she should enjoy, and life improved tremendously.

 

Seid posed the question of whether it’d be better than instead of doing the sleuthing themselves, his family could have integrated her data into a form that could be presented easily to her doctor for his advice? As self-monitoring devices such as the FitBit and iPhone applications for measuring activity become more prevalent, that data will become increasingly critical. In fact, he said, it will become irresponsible not to distill and analyze the data to guide healthcare decisions.

 

Enter MediApp, the brainchild of Sara Riggare, a Swedish engineer living with Parkinson’s Disease. Riggare calls her software a “self-care system,” designed to allow her to enter data as she moves through her day. Before she takes a dose of medication, she does a 30-second finger-tapping exercise on her smartphone’s screen to provide a baseline measurement. Then a few minutes after taking the medication she taps again, measuring the drug’s effectiveness. Because Parkinson’s is so complex, Riggare said, she wears heart rate variability and activity trackers. “I become more active when I wear them because I remember that I need to move more every day,” she said.

 

Such self-analysis, referred to as a “clinical study of one,” is often is dismissed by the medical establishment. Yet there are valuable insights that could be used to advance medical treatments.

That’s where PCORI, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, has been stepping in. Created under a provision of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, the institute grants funding to research projects that place the patient as an individual at the center of the healthcare network. Since its inception, the organization has approved 197 research projects and committed $273.5 million to them. And by the end of 2013 more than $400 million will have been distributed.

 

One of the groups benefiting from these grants is the Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute, which has put together a team of four doctors, four patients and four members of the support staff to determine what data will work best to improve the healthcare experience.


Samuel Gordon, who has inoperable pancreatic cancer, is on that team. “Being a patient, what do I know?” he asked the hushed audience. “For starters, I know everything.” Pain, he said, is the biggest problem with pancreatic cancer, yet the oncologist heading up his care team has no idea how to manage his pain.

 

Emily Kramer-Golinkoff, 28, has cystic fibrosis. Recently, when she had a particularly acute round of symptoms, most of her medical care team was out of town at, ironically, a cystic fibrosis conference. Even though they were 3,000 miles away, they stayed on top of every change in her symptoms. “I’m the living, breathing example of participatory medicine,” she told the audience. “Not all stories in medicine can have happy endings. But it’s not the ending that makes a story a success. Why don’t we change the goal from ‘happily ever after’ to ‘we’re a force when we work together.’”


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Rawwad's curator insight, October 2, 2014 5:29 AM

This is just true when word-of-mouth melt into social media to give the maximum benefits.

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Chapter 2 - Key Issue #4 - Epidemiologic Transition

Chapter 2 - Key Issue #4 - Epidemiologic Transition.
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Syrian widow tells of boat migration

Syrian widow tells of boat migration | Geography | Scoop.it
Najah Kourdi, a Syrian refugee in the Egyptian coastal city of Alexandria, speaks to the BBC about how she lost her husband after their attempt to migrate to Europe by boat went wrong.

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Geography | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

Via Seth Dixon
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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:20 AM

This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C. educator shows how food deserts and other spatial problems of poverty impact his students on a daily basis.  We usually look at life expectancy data at the national scale and that obscures some of the real issues of poverty in developed countries.  Above is a map that shows the Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was recently added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit).  Here are some maps and data from the World Bank that utilizes the Gini Index as well as an interactive Gapminder graph.  


Tags: industry, location, place, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.