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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

This video nearly brought me to tears, especially since I have two daughters and I could never imagine life without them. I can't even begin to understand why or how they could do this to innocent little babies that are harmless all because they are girls.

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Evelyn's curator insight, January 14, 8:37 AM

Girls should not be gone just because they're girls. Boys and girls are equal, girls shouldnt be treated different than boys because we are both equal. if girls were gone completly then they wont be able to have kids and family. imagine if your mom was abandoned just because she is a girl. how would that make you feel? 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 7, 10:30 PM

The way the people of China and India treat baby girls is upsetting. India and China eliminate more girls than the number of girls born every year in America; that is disturbing to think about. When a couple decides to have a child they should own up to the responsibility and take care of the baby despite the gender. I know of several people who adopted Chinese female children, luckily they had a chance at life, unfortunately, not many baby girls in China or India have that chance.  

                                                                                 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

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Rescooped by Denise Pacheco from Geography Education
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Hydraulic Fracking

Hydraulic Fracking | geography | Scoop.it

"Hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking', is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside."

 


Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

Hydrographic Turing puts people in  safety and health risks. Because the water is contaminated and because of the oil spills, blow outs, and fires. They put chemicals into the ground in order to make cracks in the earth to collect natural oil, but they use people's land in order to collect the oil. People are complaining about these industries because they now have to buy water every month instead of getting it from their sinks or wells. Not to mention some houses have already blew up or caught on favor thanks to hydro fracturing. They need to put a stop to this, at least do it on land that is not being used and far away from people.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:07 PM

Fracking is happening in some peoples backyards and it is effecting how they live. People are directly in this unhealthy atmosphere. It is causing bad things to happen to peoples health. It is especially ruining their water which is needed to cook, drink, and clean. Water is needed in our everyday lives to survive and fracking is contaminating their water. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:17 PM

Great visual aid about the dangers of fracking. this article is obviously siding with antifracking beliefs so it may be a little biest but in all honest facking may be the worst form of producing energy in the past 100 years. Offshore drilling may be unpleseant to see but as long as it dont exploded then the ecosystem around it stays intak. Fracking on the other hand can be evident miles down the road with chemtrails and runoff. I can understand why people do alot of things for money but devastating the local water supply when there is multiple new ways to produce clean energy is just shameful. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:07 PM

The development of gas is important for energy but there are health and safety risks with cracking in neighborhoods. Quality of air and water is important for survival. Nature matters and people matter, they need to find a middle ground. 

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Climate Change, Disaster Mitigation and City Planning

TED Talks As Vicki Arroyo says, it's time to prepare our homes and cities for our changing climate, with its increased risk of flooding, drought and uncertainty.

 

Our major cities are suceptible to environmental catastrophes for a whole host of reasons.  Cities depend on a smooth of goods, money and services provided by infrastructure that we take for granted and assume will always work 24/7.  Presented in the video are some ideas about how we should rethink our cities with a different ecological paradigm to protect our cities more in the future. 

 

Tags: planning, urban ecology, environment adapt, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

Governements around the world are slowly but surely creating new plans to ensure the safety of the people. They have already worked on evacuation plans and tranportation for getting people out but, they also need to think about where would people go and how will they adapt to their new enviornment. I'm glad that some places started working on plans to build houses, highways, and churches at a higher elevation, but other countries also need help figuring this stuff out. They need a solution to better secure homes and lives. Everyone needs to work together to prepare for climate change and natural disasters, especially those places where are most likely to hit.

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Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

"nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke..."


Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

I can't believe how much money this company makes in a single year. The people in this country must have some serious kidney stones lol. But on a serious note, this company definately has a good strategy on how to minimize cost transportation, because to transport 4.5 million servings that Coca Col makes in a single day, let alone, a year, must be quite expensive and time consuming. Not to mention that they distribute their products in 206 countries, they legit serve 99% of mankind. No wonder they make $670 Billion. 

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Izzy Bennett's comment, October 7, 2013 4:03 PM
The company is much larger than I thought it was and this is quite interesting how big it has gotten. The fact that so many people drink this product is amazing!
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:32 PM
As consumers, we never pay THAT much attention to how theproduct is manufactured, but only what's in it. Seeing this vide makes me wonder how many other well-known products are manufactured??
megan b clement's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:40 AM

"The video displays the maufacturing and distribution of the Coca Cola product globally. Goal is to put Coke in all hands and they need ultimate factories for distribution. For non-alcoholic beverage market Coke is number 1. They produce 800 servings a day and Coke does about 670 billion dollars in sales a year. There recipe is the best kept secret, they use words like natural flavors that help keep the recipe a secret. Logistics, cheap labor, and cheap transportation are key to maximize every dollar. "

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International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson, Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

Migration is extremely important in every country, because it does help build the economy, and for all the other positive reasons mentioned in the video. But one can also see why they put up fences and boaarders to block the entrance to the country. Growing up as a kid in RI, I would always hear whether at home or at school, about immigrants coming over and taking all of "our" jobs, and etc. Everyone was always bashing immigrants, but it's not the immigrants fault that employers want to higher them instead because of the lower salary. But still, people would say, that if they stayed in their country, then employers would have no choice but to higher the people who are from here and pay them the amount they desired. But they fail to realized, that we technically are all immigrants because even though we were born here, our grand parents or great grandparents migrated here as well. Unless you're native America, then you're not a native no matter what nationality you are. People are so asbent minded and ignorant to see that. But nonetheless, migration can be good or bad, it all depends on the reason/intentions of migrating and the results.

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Alvin Ang's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:50 PM

This resource is a good introduction into the issue of migration in a humanities topic in History or even Geography. It is a good initial segway into a topic that is current within the discourse of Australia's migration.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:57 PM

This video is an insight to what exactly migration is. It shows us that migration is what civilizations did in order to both survive and explore new territories. It also shows the prejudices that come along with migration. This occurs when one group of people migrate into an are where they are already people who have migrated there before them. it also shows the reason why it is necessary for migration to occur.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, May 20, 11:46 AM

A video giving a detailed description of international migration and its causes, and effects. The video also touches on the laws and common themes of associated with migration. 

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‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’

‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’ | geography | Scoop.it
The filmmakers present a 12-step program to establish the world’s newest country: South Sudan.

Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

I think if that if you're building a country from scratch, then you're going to have to include the following:

*Political Constitution

*Picking a Name

*An Anthem

*A Capitol

*You have to welcome your people.

*Invite the secretary general

*Honoring the flag.

*Cherishing the past (anything historical or ancient)

*Collection of first taxes.

*Training the police.

*The country would have to refrain from invading its neighbor.

*Governance is key!!!! You need to have a political constitution and come up with ways to enforce the law, also have boarders aroound the country so you can define the territory, have a cultural identity, among common interests and goal, but most importantly have recognition. If nobody recognizes that you're a country then who would take your country serious? it'll be insignificant to the rest of the world.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:54 PM

If I was to create my own country, the first thing I'd do is make sure not to shoot down any U.N. helicopters. This video does show the very hard process of creating a country from scratch.  I particularly enjoy the piece in which a government official attempts to explain taxes to folks at the marketplace because I probably had the same expression when taxes were first explained to me. "Why should I pay the government my hard earned money? They didn't do anything to earn it from me."

 

Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 12:51 PM

This is a really interesting dynamic to look into, as it's not everyday the process of founding a country can be seen at work. That's a true once in a lifetime experience for those involved, and is likely one of the harder jobs in the entirety of history.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 10:46 AM

This video and article highlight the steps a new country takes when it is carved out of an old one.  The problems and tribulations the new country faces and how it responds to the rest of the international community will decide if it will be a long lasting country or just a blip on the road of the original countries history.

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.


Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

Watching this video made me think how or if it's possible to have that many people on earth and still have enough food, jobs, and shelter for everyone. The carrying capacity seems way too densed. It is possible to fit a high number of people in one area year by year as long as we know how to use the space thats given to us. I dont think many countries have come up with an good logic or plans on how to sustain the overpopulated areas throught the globe. If they did, then there would be enough food, shelter, and jobs. There wouldn't be so many people unemployed, malnourished, and homeless if the government would come up with a plan.

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megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:15 AM

"This article is very informative as to why our world population continues to grow and grow tremendously. It continues to grow because of all the advances in medicine and better agriculture. Population grew from 1 billion in 1804 to 7 billion over two hundred years. It just all depends on how we conserve our food,water,and energy. "

olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:01 PM

Interesting video.

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:37 AM

After watching this short clip, it puts the popluation into perspective. I never knew how quickly the populaiton could grow and this video is a pure example of how it does. Over population is going to be a major problem in the future.

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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Courtney Burns
Denise Pacheco's insight:

This picture is definitely an eye opener for some people and cultures! I honestly don't think it has anything to do with men unless the culture is male dominant and all men are in charge of that country over what women should or should not wear. I can't speak for other countries, but in the US, we are allowed to dress as we please. It's completely up to the woman on what she feels comfortable in and it also has to depend on the occasion. Weather, advertisement, social media , and etc do have a lot to do with it because of the influence it has on our youth. But our opinions and assumptions on why women in other countries, especially religious based cultures, comes from what is taught to us in schools and what we hear or see on tv and the news. Most US citizens are under the impression that women in other countries who are covered up, dress that way because they're husbands, fathers, or male population don't allow for them to dress otherwise because it is an offense to their culture and religion.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 12:02 PM

A friend of mine from elementary school married a Christian woman, who converted to my friend's religion, Islam.  My friend's wife now wears the traditional hijab (spelling?), the holy garb for women that covers their heads.  I think that it's really cool that people have that sort of uniformity in their everyday life, united under a religion, and I think it really must mean a lot to my friend.  I am in an English class this semester, and there is a girl who wears one.  I think it's a respectable article of clothing to wear, probably more so than bikinis.  I guess that had I not been friends with my friend, I might not be as likely to think so.  I wonder about the weather, and what people did with the hijab-wearing during immense heat.  I can logically see that bikinis are more likely to be comfortable for females, than hijabs would be, but there is something said about the respect and sacredness of traditional religious clothing.  I really respect my friend, although we have sortof fallen out of touch after he moved out of town.  I think that as I had mentioned in a previous 'scoop,' having a friend of that religion has kept my eyes and mind open to tolerance and embracing the different culture of Islam.

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#thehubisnotaplayground Hits Penn State After Offensive Tweet

#thehubisnotaplayground Hits Penn State After Offensive Tweet | geography | Scoop.it
An offensive tweet this afternoon sparked the amazing #thehubisnotaplayground Twitter hashtag.

Via Seth Dixon, megan b clement
Denise Pacheco's insight:

I understand why she posted this because she probably was trying to focus/study, but she definitely did not need to take it to the extreme. I'm so sick of people being racist or making stereotypical remarks. Black people are not the only ones who are loud all the time. Spanish people and white people can be just as loud at times. And who cares if they are? Whatever happened to freedom of speech and expression? These minority students pay for tuition just like everyone else. So I feel like they should be able to do as they please and enjoy college because that's what it's all about at the end of the day. Sorry Ashley, if you don't like it then go sit/stand somewhere else. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 8, 2013 10:27 PM

'The HUB' is the main building on campus for student life at Penn State; it is designed to be homey and the center of indoor social activities.  This offensive tweet sparked an debate about the cultural usages of public places and racial sensitivity.  I was delighted that the Penn State online community was both thoughtful and entertaining in their online responses to a weighty topic.  Unfortunately this isn't the first PSU scandal of this nature, but it now the community is working towards having a more inclusive cultural ethos.     

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:37 AM

This link might be too provocative for a freshman or sophomore class, but when doing a unit on technology in a geography class, links like these that show how technology should not be used, is a perfect way to teach students a lesson on responsibilty. I would recommend this to all teachers that plan to use technology in their classrooms and show the affects when technology is used the wrong way. Technology is the best thing we have but it is also the worst thing. As teachers we can use this to instill responsibility in our students and show them what happens when things like that are said. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:39 PM
I think that this is complete ignorance. People who were never taught not to think before they think, she clearly was not. It was not only ignorant, but racist. I hope there was consequences to her actions.
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The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island

The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island | geography | Scoop.it

"When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’, just off the coast of the island nation of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean."


Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

The view from above is gorgeous! Nature's beauty at its finest. And to think that African slaves had escaped to go live at the mountain on this island, it's amazing. Although I wonder what resources did they have to make it there especially since the island is quite a distance from Africa?! Makes you wonder :)

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 26, 2013 11:19 AM

this look pretty nice i would like to go see it in person

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:36 PM

By looking at this picture you automatically think its a waterfall within the water. This image is actually just showing the mix of sand and silt deposits mixing together. The light to dark colors is what makes it look like a waterfall. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:24 PM

Another spectacular sight. Of course, you will need a plane or helicopter to venture above it to see it, but this illusion is pretty nifty.

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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

This video nearly brought me to tears, especially since I have two daughters and I could never imagine life without them. I can't even begin to understand why or how they could do this to innocent little babies that are harmless all because they are girls.

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Evelyn's curator insight, January 14, 8:37 AM

Girls should not be gone just because they're girls. Boys and girls are equal, girls shouldnt be treated different than boys because we are both equal. if girls were gone completly then they wont be able to have kids and family. imagine if your mom was abandoned just because she is a girl. how would that make you feel? 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 7, 10:30 PM

The way the people of China and India treat baby girls is upsetting. India and China eliminate more girls than the number of girls born every year in America; that is disturbing to think about. When a couple decides to have a child they should own up to the responsibility and take care of the baby despite the gender. I know of several people who adopted Chinese female children, luckily they had a chance at life, unfortunately, not many baby girls in China or India have that chance.  

                                                                                 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

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"Political Landscapes"

"Political Landscapes" | geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

This pictures shows the difference between the city and suburbs. Even in the same city, you can  have some parts that look more economically wealthier. But looking at it from a political view, I would guess that the whole in the ground that divides the two neighborhoods would be the line that divides democrats and republicans. City folk tend to vote more democrat because they want the government to assist the people. WHile Republicans tend to look out more for themselves.

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Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 29, 2013 12:33 PM

The picture ‘Political Landscapes,’ is a portrait of the haves and the have not’s and it illustrates the widening chasm of socioeconomic levels with the top 1% gaining and the rest steadily losing ground.  

 

The decline of industry very often leads to the decline in jobs, schools and local government.  With the erosion of the tax base cities are no longer able to maintain these institutions.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2013 1:03 PM

While touring Kevin Babola's art studio yesterday, I found this thought-provoking piece entitled ‘Political Landscapes.’ I greatly enjoyed my conversation with the artist about the political, economic and urban visions that went into this painting.  The conceptual idea behind this painting started when the artist was exploring the neighborhoods of New Bedford, MA and noticed how a sense of place can change very quickly. I dare say most cities have areas similar to the one portrayed here where the socioeconomic character changes very abruptly. While physically it might be very easy to cross from the side of the street with tenements to the neighborhood with single family homes, making that transition permanent is incredibly difficult.

 

Questions to ponder: what leads to cities having abrupt changes in the urban fabric? What might this chasm represent to people on either side of the divide? How does this impact the neighborhood institutions (schools, local government, etc.)?  Please visit the artist's webpage at: http://www.kbolaillustration.com

Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 8:41 AM
this picture meant a lot to me simple due to the fact that I've lived in the city of providence for the last three years now. everywhere I look in the city shows an identical view to this picture that protrays inner-city compact houses vs grass and space of the kind of suburbs. on the right is the inner-city version where houses are only separated by a one car width driveway and are two to three stores high to accommadate more families and people. the left side of the picture protrays a more suburb area of the city. but this area isn't necessarily the suburbs because it would be an area just minute outside of the busy city center like a north providence or east providence area. in north providence yes you technically have a yard and grass but it is so small that you mine as well have scissors to cut the lawn. with a bite more space houses being more single family oriented this is more luxurious than the left side of the picture
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Migration in America - Forbes

Migration in America - Forbes | geography | Scoop.it

"More people left Phoenix in 2009 than came. The map above visualizes moves to and from Phoenix; counties that took more migrants than they sent are linked with red lines. Counties that sent more migrants than they took are linked with blue lines."


Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

This map makes sense. Most of the areas in blue are the areas which are filled with diversity and mixed cultures. The areas in red or more rural or subarb areas which probably are filled with (not all) but lots of racist people who wouldn't normally accept mixed groups. This map kind of tells a lot about politics too, because most of where the migrants are settling is normally where a lot of Democrats tend to be, vs. the red and ALSO, the areas with neither blue or red, tend to vote more Republican. I also think it's interesting to see how the people who are mostly coming in our scattered around, but most stayed in the middle or east coast of the map. And the red areas are the west coast and the southern part of the east coap and the map.

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Aimee Knight's curator insight, September 16, 2013 10:12 AM

This article shows the efficiency of United States citizens in the area of finding a home based on their own needs. When a family moves from one city to another within the same country, it is normally due to financial problems or to better accomadate the family as a home. Once their hometown can no longer support them adequately, they move, and once that place goes downhill, they move again. Americans chase after the ideal life through internal migration and it seems to work.

The Crew's curator insight, September 16, 2013 10:18 AM

This is mainly about migration in the states . There is alot of movement that goes unseen . People move for better jobs and opertunities also people move for their jobs. People even move in the same county just differnt location. Many people leave to go to the big cities . -Landon ;) 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2013 9:32 AM


I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications.

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Planting Rice

Thailand...

Feel free to mute the commentary...this video demonstrates the truly 'back-breaking' work that is a part of paddy rice farming. 


Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

Just watching them work makes my back hurt. I feel terribel for them, but it is their job. I wonder if there are any machines or tools that they can use to get their job done more uickly and easier. Agriculture started off just like this. It was only people planting and doing all the work, but now in there are machines used for this new generation of agriculture. It's just sad that many countries still can't afford all these tools or machines. So unfortunately, people do have to physically hurt themselves or go through some sort of pain just to get things done. But this video makes me appreicate more where my food is coming from, because the foods that I buy does come from all over the world.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:25 AM

This video shows the amount of work that goes into rice farming in Asian countries.  People of Asian countries heavily rely on rice as a staple in their diets.  These people take part in immense manual labor on small farms and farm rice for their own local consumption.  It is 'back-breaking' work and it shows what many people must do in order to get their food.  It is not as easy as driving down the street to the grocery store, as we take for granted in the United States and other nations.

Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:20 AM
this video of Thailand shows just how different life styles are throughout the world. Americans for instance wouldn't be found dead doing this type of labor work. that goes to show just how shallow americans are and how incredible these people are for doing labor of this nature. planting rice is not only a life style they pick to do it is a life style they must do. with rice being Thailand's prime export and an ideal location for rice paddys this "job" isn't actually a job its a must do. these women spend hundreds of hours a week doing this.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:11 PM

When you look at Thailand from satellite imagery, it looks as though much of the country has a tannish color which you would think is dry and has less vegetation compared to neighboring countries.  The country actual has quite a bit of rainfall, and the suspect for all the dry-looking areas is farming fields for things such as rice.  This is serious manual labor with constant bending and speedy methods.  Though in a culture, and broader surrounding region that uses rice so frequently in their meals, having these type of farms is necessary to everyday life.

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Pop culture in the Arab world

TED Talks At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist.

Via Seth Dixon
Denise Pacheco's insight:

I don't think popular culture and folk culture interact very well. They believe in completely different things and live different types of lives according to their values. The speaker means that the cultural interaction is intertwined together because of the islamic people who have borrowed cultural ideas from other ancient and modern civilizations and adapted it to their own. That's why it's meshed as a opposed to clashing or mash. For example, the music video channel that's like MTV. I think it's kind of funny how they made the people in that music video, that's from the USA, look like we also worship Allah. Also, the comic books show religious values in it, especially since the characters come from it. They want young people to not get sucked in to the outside world or modern culture from different societies, so instead they want to incorporate their religion with our ideas of culture.

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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 11, 2013 11:59 PM

What type of diffusion is this? Also an example of ______________

Max Krishchuk's comment, April 30, 2013 9:44 AM
This is an interesting TED talk that centers on the integration of western culture with Arab culture. The Arab pop culture is very different from what I thought that it would be. It takes hard work to produce a culture that is modern yet still centers on Islamic foundation, but is seems like the Arab world has put in the work. The new culture is significant because that means that the people in the Arab world know what pop culture is and why it is important. The speaker says that the culture is a mesh of the old and new. She does not call it a mash or clash because there are certain parts that are being used from the West, such as superheroes and music videos, but the overall culture is centered on Islam. The people in the Middle East still learn about Islamic ideas and thought, but now get to learn about the subjects with superheroes. This is relevant in modern times and even in my life because as a Christian, I try to find movies, music, and entertainment that is different from the world. It is also hard for me to do so because there is a lot of nonsense out in the world that is portrayed as being normal.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:01 PM

Religion plays a huge role in the Arab world and although times are changung they are trying to stay true to their culture. Sherren el feki says that meshing of civilization is important.  Taking popular culture and meshing it with culture will be successful. For instance the comic book 99, fitst Islam superhero. The 99 I to represent the 99 attributes. The 99 superheroes will hopefully join forces with Americas superman,etc. it is not meant to be a clash but to  mix the different cultures in both ancient in modern ways. 

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30 Months To Save The World! It's Time for World Leaders and Industry to Step Up! If they don't ...

30 Months To Save The World! It's Time for World Leaders and Industry to Step Up! If they don't ... | geography | Scoop.it

As our weather grows more wild, the scary reality of a climate in crisis is unfolding. Vast columns of Methane gas are now spewing into our atmosphere. We have 30 months until the Paris Summit, the meeting that world leaders have decided will determine the fate of our efforts to fight climate change. Last chance?


Via Lusk Creek Rider
Denise Pacheco's insight:

30 months to save the world?? That's definitely something no one wants to think about! It's horrifying to think what might happen to us if this problem does not get fixed. We all need to come together and do something. But who will listen? Who cares enough to step up and do something even in our own backyard? Yes, oil spills , pollution, and global warming have something to do with it but we do too! People all around us smoke, use gas in our cars, waste water while we shower or brush our teeth every morning, and etc. This is obviously something we all have known since we were children but why haven't we done anything to change or fix the problem? It's just getting worse and worse. I want to live past the next 30 months , do you?

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Rescooped by Denise Pacheco from Geography World News
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The end of nature?

The end of nature? | geography | Scoop.it
It isn’t the first time I’ve been to Usinsk in the very north of Russia, so I shouldn’t be surprised — but once again, I’m shocked.

 

An interesting look at some environmental issues in the far north of Russia (and when Russians think that it's far north, it's REALLY far north).


Via Seth Dixon, megan b clement
Denise Pacheco's insight:

It's horrifying to see such a large space go to such waste thanks to toxic oil spills. Business / people have no respect for nature. This space could have been used to build homes, start a new business , or even for agricultural purpose. The government should step in and clean this up because this land can help boost their economy as well if they put it to good use. It's mind over matter! They need to get to work on this ASAP!

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Stacey Jackson's curator insight, March 16, 2013 10:41 PM

This story is being told again and again around the world. Major corporations swoop in, take over natural resources, make enormous profits, completely devastate a region and destroy a way of life for indigenous people. The documentary Crude (2009) tells the same story of oil spills destroying a community in Ecuador and their struggle for justice.

megan b clement's curator insight, September 10, 2013 12:27 PM

"The people of Usinsk have seem to have lost everything. Their once beautiful nature, land, animals, and people as well. Men who used to hunt have lost their supply, animals who lived here have died off, and people who have assisted to help clean the land have also become casualities to the oil spills. You can smell the toxic oil in the air and see the damage done over time."

Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 11:35 AM

I never thought of the impact of on-land oil spills, usually it's only something I'd think occurred in the oceans, but I understand now that oil spreading throughout the soil and forests can have an effect just as disastrous.

Rescooped by Denise Pacheco from Marissa's Geog400
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Ancient Maya grave yields dozens of mutilated bodies

Ancient Maya grave yields dozens of mutilated bodies | geography | Scoop.it
An excavation at the site of an ancient Maya city in Mexico has yielded a gruesome find: the remains of dismembered, decapitated bodies....

Via Marissa Roy
Denise Pacheco's insight:

Shocking! I've learned a lot about the Mayan culture and religion, but never would I've guessed that they were this violent or gruesome in warfare. The things you learn in history class makes the ancient mayan people seem so religious and as if the people were all one! It's just fascinating to see that even without modern day technology they were able to create weapons, bury victims, and cover their tracks. 

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Marissa Roy's curator insight, September 11, 2013 3:08 PM

I love learning about ancient civilizations and this find is pretty interesting. The Mayans are known well for their sacrificial ceremonies and this illustrates that these events really DID happen.