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Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen?

Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen? | Geography | Scoop.it

"The ultimate list of the greatest wonders in the world."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 7:51 PM

I have been fortunate enough to have visited 53 of the places on this list (I have gaping holes in my list and the list itself has some gaping holes itself).  All lists are highly subjective; this list, for example, is heay on urban/cultural/European tourism sites and light on physical/Asian/African destinations.  Most geographers already have enough reasons to go traveling, but this list might spark more.  Who wants to map out these places to verify that initial impression? 

 

Questions to Ponder: Which places are on your dream list?  Which places do you think should have been added to this list?  

 

Tags: place, tourismculture, landscape, geo-inspiration.

Ken Feltman's curator insight, April 19, 8:13 AM
Where in the world have you been?
Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 19, 4:47 PM
Share your insight
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A New Map for America

A New Map for America | Geography | Scoop.it
The 50-state model is holding the country back. It needs a new system, built around urban corridors.

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Jean-Simon Venne's curator insight, April 28, 8:13 AM
We should build a similar map for technology innovaton
Character Minutes's curator insight, July 1, 7:13 PM
Great way to encourage critical thinking in students: what would this impact? Adv & Disadvantages? Compare 50 states vs this model? How would new plan be implemented? 

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 30, 2:26 PM
...and back to city states?
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The Ever-Expanding Slums

"Slums lack:

Permanent housingSufficient spaceClean waterSanitationPersonal safety
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L.Long's curator insight, May 5, 5:59 PM
World's Largest Slums
Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 6:29 AM
Another GREAT resource to show to Geography students! 
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 2, 12:29 AM

The liveability of urban slums in the developing world makes an interesting study linking access to services and facilities, community identity, social connectedness, environmental quality and safety. 

 

Follow an introduction to slums using this video clip and 8.11 with the following resources that investigate the impact of rapid urbanisation on the liveability of cities.

 

Slums are a consequence of urbanisation studied in more depth  in Changing Places (Stage 9) - consequences of urbanisation. Limit the study of slums to liveability issues in stage 4 or an introduction to factors influencing liveability. 

 

GeoWorld 7 NSW

Chapter 7: Liveability:Measurement and environmental factors 

7.6 Access to shelter

Chapter 8 Urban, rural and remote places

8.6 An urban world

8.7 Why go to town?

8.8 Large cities attract people

8.10 Skyscrapers and slums

8.11 Kibera slums and flying toilets

Geothink people live in cities - Figure 8.14.3

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2015 Saw a Decrease in Global Religious Freedom

2015 Saw a Decrease in Global Religious Freedom | Geography | Scoop.it

The global refugee crisis, political strife and economic dislocation all contributed to a worldwide deterioration of religious freedom in 2015 and an increase in societal intolerance, according to the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 9:33 AM

This is one of the sad results of the many global conflicts today and increase in reactionary political movements that scapegoat religious minorities.  The image above is a map/wordle of the 18th article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which states: "Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance."  

 

Tags: religion, ChristianityIslamBuddhismHinduismJudaism, podcastconflict, refugees.

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Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?

Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others? | Geography | Scoop.it
Reports of bombings tend to get huge numbers of mentions on social media, but that doesn't always mean a similar level of news coverage.

Via Seth Dixon
Dee Dee Deeken's insight:

The short answer is obviously "Yes."  Yet, this question brings up other questions about cultural empathy and how 'connected' we might feel to people of other places than our own global neighborhood.  This political cartoon-ish map

has more truth in it than we might like to admit; it is subtitled 'How terrible it is the the Western world when a tragedy happens in...?'

 

Questions to Ponder: Does the 'where' influence if we perceive the event as a true tragedy or not (or maybe just the magnitude or importance of the tradegy)?  How come?  What does this say about us as inidividuals, society, and the media?  How can we teach our students in a way to foster more cultural empathy?

 

Tags:  social media, place, culture, political, terrorism, media. 

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jorden harris's curator insight, April 4, 9:52 AM

to me it is mind boggling how we can pay more attention to countries with national threats than others especially with ISIS being so prominent which is a war that is going to take help from not only the united states but the other affected countries

                                                                                                        - J.H

Logan scully's curator insight, April 4, 10:11 AM
It somewhat bothers me how that terrorist attacks outside of Europe and North America is pretty much just ignored by the social media while people are sitting in the hospital for crimes in which terrorists and other religious radicalists have done to their area and country.-L.S.
Brealyn Holley's curator insight, April 7, 10:20 AM
For the question "Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?" In my opinion the answer would be yes because a lot of the terror attacks in the Western world are bigger and are expected more than terror attacks near  us. ~BH
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Israel to create a new egalitarian prayer plaza at Western Wall

Israel to create a new egalitarian prayer plaza at Western Wall | Geography | Scoop.it
The government approved a plan to allow pluralistic, and mixed-gender prayer, at Judaism’s holy site.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 2, 6:49 PM

In the past, Israeli policewomen have detained members of the religious group Women of the Wall for breaching orthodox rules governing prayers at the site. This is Judaism's most holy site and orthodox traditions have legally prevailed here, defining who could be there and who could perform which religious rites (often on gender lines).  This fight represents a struggle to redefine the meaning and usage of public space in Jerusalem (among other complex issues).  The article states that "this marks an unprecedented move by the Israeli government to officially recognize the rights of Conservative, Reform and other Jewish denominations to hold organized prayer at the site."

 

Tags: Israel, culture, genderspace, religion, Judaism,
Middle East.

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23 Untranslatable Foreign Words That Describe Love Better Than You Ever Thought

23 Untranslatable Foreign Words That Describe Love Better Than You Ever Thought | Geography | Scoop.it
We have several words to describe love in English yet still, there are some shades within the spectrum of that emotion we haven't been able to capture in our own language.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 13, 9:55 AM

The languages we speak shape our ideas, communications, and to some extent, the possibilities open to us.  There are many ideas that I used to be able to express better in Spanish than I could in English (even though English is my first language, some Spanish words seem to capture the essence of my emotions in a more enriching and satistfying way than in English). If you want to try any of these out for Valentine's Day, be my guest, but if it get's you in trouble, it's not my fault!    

 

Tags: language, culture.

Laura Brown's curator insight, February 14, 2:34 AM

The languages we speak shape our ideas, communications, and to some extent, the possibilities open to us.  There are many ideas that I used to be able to express better in Spanish than I could in English (even though English is my first language, some Spanish words seem to capture the essence of my emotions in a more enriching and satistfying than in English). If you want to try any of these out for Valentine's Day, be my guest, but if it get's you in trouble, it's not my fault!    

 

Tags: language, culture.

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How Do Sunni and Shia Islam Differ?

How Do Sunni and Shia Islam Differ? | Geography | Scoop.it
With Saudi Arabia’s execution of a Shiite cleric inflaming tensions in the Middle East, here is a primer on the differences between the two branches of Islam.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 12:39 PM

Knowing the geography of the Sunni-Shiite division is incredibly important for a good understanding of world regional geography as well as modern geopolitics (see a detailed map of the spatial distribution here). This 5 minute video (as well as this NPR podcast) examine the historical and religious aspects of this split to then analyze the political and cultural implications in the Middle East today.  Additionally this Pew Research article highlights the 5 countries where the the majority of Muslims are Shiite, with some good demographic data to add to the analysis.  Take this quiz to test your knowledge on the differences between the two major branches of Islam.   

 

TagsMiddleEastIslamreligionhistorical, culture.

Patty B's curator insight, March 11, 12:14 PM
In today's day and age, it is becoming increasingly more important to properly distinguish and better understand peoples of all different nationalities and religions. As is the case with Africans, Americans tend to lump all Muslims together. We have a tendency to judge Muslim people based on extremely broad and preconceived notions that are the cause (and/or the result?) of tension between Americans and Muslims living the Middle East. Just as we often consider Africa to be a country (when it's really an entire continent), we often regard all Muslims to universally hold the same beliefs, while in reality, that is very far from the truth. This article touches on the basic differences that exist within the Muslim community, mainly the distinction between Sunni and Shiite groups. I would consider the difference between Sunni and Shiite Muslims to Protestants and Catholics in the United States. A foreigner would not, upon first impressions, recognize any distinction between a Catholic and a Protestant. But in reality, Catholics and Protestants originally come from different areas of the world and hold many different beliefs in regards to ideology despite both being Christian religions. I think this article offers an opportunity for "Westerners" (it seems kind of hypocritical to use such a broad term) to understand that other religions, and in particular the Muslim religion, have aspects to them that are quite similar to aspects of our own culture and religions. 
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Blood Borders: A Proposal To Redraw A "New Middle East"

Blood Borders: A Proposal To Redraw A "New Middle East" | Geography | Scoop.it
The map above is a 2006 proposed plan to redrawn the borders of the Middle East by Ralph Peters a a retired United States Army lieutenant colonel.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 1:16 PM

This is not an endorsement of the proposal, but it is filled with discussion points.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 16, 2015 11:26 AM

A fascinating map of the Middle East. Much of the redrawn borders would likely ease tension in the Middle East. That is largely due to the fact most of the modern Middle eastern states like those in Africa are artificial creations of European colonialism. The artificial nature of the borders has led to decades of conflict due to sectarian and cultural conflicts that plague the middle east even today with endemic warfare. Three problems however present themselves on this map that are not addressed properly. First Yemen is divided into Sunni and Shiite groups and in this depiction it is not divided to compensate for this. Additionally Kuwait should not be its own entity and instead should be given to the Arab Shia State who claims historic ownership and has also been a very contested spot (leaving it there like Yemen would result in wars). Lastly and the most problematic would be the restoration of Israels pre-1967 borders. A major and potentially catastrophic demographic shift would have to take place. Furthermore the division of Israel and Palestine has been a point of contention and war in the Middle East for the past 60 or more years. The pre war of 67 borders would only keep tensions going. The proper solution would be 1 of two things. Divide the country north and south (with the Jews getting their historical lands to the south and properly name it Judea but also to disassociate with all the problems the modern state of Israel created). This would give both the Jews and Palestinians defensible borders and also provide each with a decent sized homeland along with half of Jerusalem. The second and darker option would be to eliminate one of the two countries and relocate its people somewhere else to prevent conflict but that option while solving the regional issue would create a global one by having to relocate millions of people.

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Photographing mega-cities from 12,000 feet

Photographing mega-cities from 12,000 feet | Geography | Scoop.it
Photographer Vincent Laforet spent the early stages of 2015 photographing the likes of New York, Las Vegas, London, Sydney and Barcelona from a helicopter.

 

Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities, images.


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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, December 6, 2015 10:19 PM

Great photo of city ... 

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Teaching about Syrian Refugees

Teaching about Syrian Refugees | Geography | Scoop.it
The Syrian Civil War that stemmed out of the Arab Spring in 2012 morphed into a conflict unlike any of the other Arab Spring protests. In the years before the Arab Spring, Syria experienced an extended drought led to declining agricultural production and social discontent even before the spark of revolutionary change swept the region. The rise of ISIS in the power struggle has led to horrifying atrocities that leave ordinary citizens seeking the most basic of human needs: safety, shelter, food and water.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:40 AM
 Syrian Refugees
Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:40 PM

Its amazing how a civil war sparked a total of 11 million refugees or displacement up to date. Turkey, Iraq, Jordan, are a major help in providing space for these refugees.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 2:08 PM

The conflict in Syria that stemmed from the Arab Spring led to many refugees fleeing to escape the horrible political condition. These people are different from migrants because they have no choice but to leave. According to UN laws they are provided necessary aid and a place to stay until their country is safe again. However, the Syrian War is escalating quickly rather than showing any sign of stopping. It may be possible these refugees will not have a home and will be an ethnic minority in host countries. 

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Peru Plans First Contact with Isolated Amazonian Tribe

Peru Plans First Contact with Isolated Amazonian Tribe | Geography | Scoop.it
In a controversial decision, the Peruvian government is planning to make contact for the first time with the Mashco Piro, a tribe living in the Amazon jungle.

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Disappearing Tuvalu: World's Fourth-Smallest Country Makes An Appeal

Disappearing Tuvalu: World's Fourth-Smallest Country Makes An Appeal | Geography | Scoop.it
The prime minister of Tuvalu wants world leaders to organize a global pact to address the issue of climate change.

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Cultural appropriation gone wrong

Occurred at San Francisco State University on 3/28/2016. /u/nicholas-silvera

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 25, 3:01 PM

This is probably the clearest example (that went viral) of anger about cultural appropriation gone wrong.  This is a hot-button topic, and this video is food for thought (or fanning the flames).  Cultural appropriation might be seen as offensive, but it cetainly isn't illegal.     

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The Ever-Expanding Slums

"Slums lack:

Permanent housingSufficient spaceClean waterSanitationPersonal safety
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L.Long's curator insight, May 5, 5:59 PM
World's Largest Slums
Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 6:29 AM
Another GREAT resource to show to Geography students! 
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 2, 12:29 AM

The liveability of urban slums in the developing world makes an interesting study linking access to services and facilities, community identity, social connectedness, environmental quality and safety. 

 

Follow an introduction to slums using this video clip and 8.11 with the following resources that investigate the impact of rapid urbanisation on the liveability of cities.

 

Slums are a consequence of urbanisation studied in more depth  in Changing Places (Stage 9) - consequences of urbanisation. Limit the study of slums to liveability issues in stage 4 or an introduction to factors influencing liveability. 

 

GeoWorld 7 NSW

Chapter 7: Liveability:Measurement and environmental factors 

7.6 Access to shelter

Chapter 8 Urban, rural and remote places

8.6 An urban world

8.7 Why go to town?

8.8 Large cities attract people

8.10 Skyscrapers and slums

8.11 Kibera slums and flying toilets

Geothink people live in cities - Figure 8.14.3

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Anyone who wants to be president needs to understand these 5 maps

Anyone who wants to be president needs to understand these 5 maps | Geography | Scoop.it
Parag Khanna argues that these five maps are critical to understand the world we live in.

 

Maps shape how we see the world.  But most of the maps hanging on our walls are dangerously incomplete because they emphasize political borders rather than functional connections.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 12:11 AM

These 5 maps in this article are a sneak peek preview from the new book Connectography by Parag Khanna.  These maps all highlight interactions across political borders which is Khanna's big thesis.  For example, the map above emphasizes political, economic, and environmental linkages of NAFTA and minimizes the national divisions.    

 

Tags: regionsNorth Americamap, map archive.

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Here Are The Self-Declared Nations You Won't See At The UN

Here Are The Self-Declared Nations You Won't See At The UN | Geography | Scoop.it
These nations might not have representation, but they play a major role in international affairs.

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Dee Dee Deeken's insight:

Not all countries are created equal.  Political states gain power, prestige and legitimacy when other states recognize their territorial claims.  These 11 places are examples of de-facto states, insurgent states, and exceptions to the general geopolitical order, often created out of border disputes, geopolitical turmoil or tension. 

 

Tags: political, states, borders, geopolitics.

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Christian Allié's curator insight, March 31, 5:44 AM

Not all countries are created equal.  Political states gain power, prestige and legitimacy when other states recognize their territorial claims.  These 11 places are examples of de-facto states, insurgent states, and exceptions to the general geopolitical order, often created out of border disputes, geopolitical turmoil or tension. 

 

Tags: political, states, borders, geopolitics.

degrowth economy and ecology's curator insight, March 31, 9:41 AM

Not all countries are created equal.  Political states gain power, prestige and legitimacy when other states recognize their territorial claims.  These 11 places are examples of de-facto states, insurgent states, and exceptions to the general geopolitical order, often created out of border disputes, geopolitical turmoil or tension. 

 

Tags: political, states, borders, geopolitics.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 12:56 PM

Not all countries are created equal.  Political states gain power, prestige and legitimacy when other states recognize their territorial claims.  These 11 places are examples of de-facto states, insurgent states, and exceptions to the general geopolitical order, often created out of border disputes, geopolitical turmoil or tension. 

 

Tags: political, states, borders, geopolitics.

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Growing Up in a Pornified Culture | Gail Dines | TEDxNavesink

Popular culture bombards us with hypersexualized images of women and men, conveying powerful images that help shape our sexuality. Dr. Gail Dines, recipient ...

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The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind?

The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind? | Geography | Scoop.it
Genetically modified foods are often regarded as "unnatural" and approached with distrust. Commentator Tania Lombrozo considers the psychology behind these reactions.

 

Why do so many people oppose genetically modified organisms, or GMOs? According to a new paper forthcoming in the journal Trends in Plant Science, it's because opposition to GMOs taps into deep cognitive biases. These biases conspire to make arguments against GMOs intuitive and compelling, whether or not they're backed by strong evidence.

The authors of the paper — a mix of philosophers and biologists — turn to research in the cognitive sciences to shed light on the mismatch between the public's perception of GMOs (which is fairly negative, especially in Europe) and the state of the evidence about their safety (which is fairly positive).

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.


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Title IX: Let 'em Play

On June 23, 1972, President Nixon signed an educational amendment to prevent sex discrimination in educational institutions. Although sports were notspecifi...

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Analyzing Maps to Better Understand Global Current Events and History

Analyzing Maps to Better Understand Global Current Events and History | Geography | Scoop.it
In this lesson, we provide strategies to help students accurately interpret maps, and we suggest ways for using current event maps as a tool to better understand both history and what’s going on in the world today.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 22, 10:57 AM

The NY Times learning blog really has some interesting, insightful lessons.  This one looks at using maps to understand culture and history, and how it affects today.  

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 12:44 AM

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 


 


Tagsmapping, K12, scale, location.

Nora Morton's curator insight, October 10, 1:54 PM
A fantastic source on how to use maps in the classrooms and questions to help guide students into further exploration.  Provides numerous links to help understand the background and various types of maps, samples linking history with current events, and tools to create your own maps. 
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English and Its Undeserved Good Luck: Lingua Franca

English and Its Undeserved Good Luck: Lingua Franca | Geography | Scoop.it

"In my post last week I cited a few ways in which English is unsuitable as a global language, and mentioned that its being one anyway is attributable at least in part to undeserved luck. Of course, it wasn’t all luck."

 

Tags: language, colonialism,  diffusion, culture, English.


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jorden harris's curator insight, March 10, 10:02 AM
the fact that out of all of the languages that could have been a lingua franca is suprising J.H.
Logan scully's curator insight, March 10, 10:13 AM
It is astouding to me that out of all those languages that could have been a lingua franca.-L.S.
Cohen Adkins's curator insight, March 10, 10:18 AM
In my opinion i believe that English should be used and learned by every country since most of the world already uses it.It would be more convenient for others to speak English however people should also be required to learn a side language and not just for college. -C.A
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Ghanaian coffins

Ghanaian coffins | Geography | Scoop.it

"Amid calls for a three-day weekend in Ghana to allow residents to attend more funeral parties (with the emphasis on party), here's a look at some of the country's famous customized coffins."


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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:18 PM

the idea that funerals should be festive is an idea with a large history. it is also, i think, a very good idea. many people already get together after a funeral and drink and talk about the good times they had with the dead person, and it helps with a sort of closure.

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 5:24 PM

I've never heard of this type of burial traditions. The typical burial that I hear about and experience are the old, wake and funeral the day after the wake.  I've also heard of funerals that are held in New Orleans, when someone died the people of New Orleans paraded down the street singing and playing happy music. This was a celebration of there life. Wakes and funerals that I'm used to are always sad and depressing and held at a church and funeral home then the deceased are to be buried at a cemetery. In this article, caskets are designed differently, as you can see in the photo above. Some caskets are in the shape of a shoe, fish, car, or even a camera. Interesting way to celebrate the deceased.

Patty B's curator insight, February 11, 4:22 PM

The Ghanaian coffins exemplify the unique differences still found within cultures around the world despite a highly globalized society. In particular, this webpage reveals how cultures still vary by showing how one way in which Ghanaians honor their deceased, which is by having elaborate, fun, and symbolic coffins made. The coffins seem representative of the deceased’s personality, interests, occupation, and overall who they were in society, what they were known for, and what they loved most. Many societies or religions honor their loved ones by remembering the same things that Ghanaians remember, but do say in a different manner. I think a custom such as the coffin making of the Ghanaians would be something our society and similar societies would accept. Themed weddings are becoming a big hit, I don’t see why Western culture would be so against adopting themed funerals as well in some sense. 

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Where Children Sleep: Portraits From Around The World

Where Children Sleep: Portraits From Around The World | Geography | Scoop.it
Photographer James Mollison is of the mind that a child's bedroom speaks volumes about his or her circumstances.

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 13, 2015 11:55 PM

This will make you look at your own situation and reflect.

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The river traders of Brazil

The river traders of Brazil | Geography | Scoop.it
There is a unique and dangerous commerce system at work in Amazonia, where children risk their lives for a few pennies.

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