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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | Geography | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


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Awesome interactive map showing the relative religious composition of states.

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Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:04 PM

Different cultural religions and senses of place in America. This graph shows the diversity of religion around the united states as it varies from place to place. 

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AP Human Geography FRQs

AP Human Geography FRQs | Geography | Scoop.it

"Based upon student reactions to their multiple choice exams, I can tell that the types of questions are NOT, 'choose the correct definition for the vocabulary term.' Instead, the types of questions are leading towards giving an example of a real world phenomenon and then requesting students to tell which term best applies. And though I have not seen an actual test, it sounds like the kids were saying that the questions require more reading than the answers (I would actually prefer that to the alternative)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2015 10:46 AM

This article (with the outstanding infographic above) from the Human Imprint is an excellent primer to get students ready for the APHG exam.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.  

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The Rohingya in Myanmar: How Years of Strife Grew Into a Crisis

The Rohingya in Myanmar: How Years of Strife Grew Into a Crisis | Geography | Scoop.it
Life has long been fraught for a Muslim minority in mainly Buddhist Myanmar, but the recent “ethnic cleansing” has sent Rohingya fleeing en masse.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 3:25 PM

Many students have asked the question "Who are the Rohingya?" The Muslim minority group, concentrated near the Bangladeshi has a long history of marginalization. Its members lack full citizenship in Myanmar (Burma), and many in Myanmar deny that the Rohingya are a native ethnic group, claiming that they are recent Bengali immigrants. Now, fierce clashes between security forces and Rohingya militants left hundreds dead and entire villages torched to the ground. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have fled over the border into Bangladesh.

 

Tags: migration, politicalconflict, refugeesBurma, Southeast Asia.

M Sullivan's curator insight, September 19, 9:00 PM
Shocking reality of life for people in Myanmar to follow on from reading the novel 'Bamboo People' by Mitali Perkins.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 3:07 AM

Global challenges - Population - including Migration - refugees

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The Edge of the Plates

The Edge of the Plates | Geography | Scoop.it

"Tomales Bay lies about 50 kilometers (30 miles) northwest of San Francisco, along the edges of two tectonic plates that are grinding past each other. The boundary between them is the San Andreas Fault, the famous rift that partitions California for hundreds of miles. To the west of the Bay is the Pacific plate; to the east is the North American plate. The rock on the western shore of the Bay is granite, an igneous rock that formed underground when molten material slowly cooled over time. On the opposite shore, the land is a mix of several types of marine sedimentary rocks. In Assembling California, John McPhee calls that side “a boneyard of exotica,” a mixture of rock of 'such widespread provenance that it is quite literally a collection from the entire Pacific basin, or even half of the surface of the planet.'"

 

Tags: geomorphology, remote sensing, tectonics, geology, California, coastal, physical.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 22, 6:28 AM
Geomorphic processes
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What on Earth Is Wrong With Connecticut?

What on Earth Is Wrong With Connecticut? | Geography | Scoop.it
Conservatives say the state has a tax problem. Liberals say it has an inequality problem. What it really has is a city problem.

 

Connecticut is losing rich companies (and their tax revenues) while it’s adding low-wage workers, like personal-care aides and retail salespeople. Yet it remains a high-tax state. That’s a recipe for a budget crisis.

 

The rise and fall of Connecticut fits into the story of American cities. In the 1970s, American metros were suffering a terrible crime wave, and New York was dropping dead. That meant boom times for New York’s suburbs and southwestern Connecticut. But now many of those companies are moving back, lured by newly lower-crime cities and the hip urban neighborhoods where the most educated young workers increasingly want to live.

 

Finally, the hottest trend in American migration today is south, west, and cheap—that is, far away from Connecticut, both geographically and economically. Texas is growing rapidly, and seven of the 10 fastest-growing large metropolitan areas in 2016 were in the Carolinas and Florida. Of the 20 fastest-growing metros, none are in the northeast.

 

Tags: urban, regions, economic.


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Mr Mac's curator insight, August 8, 4:58 PM
Unit 4 - Local Politics, Unit 6 - Economic Development, Unit 7 - Urban 
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Geography Right Here. Right Now.

Amazing facts for a Geography of the 21st Century. See www.geography.org.uk See www.pupilvision.com


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, November 3, 2013 9:26 PM
What is Geography? Why teach Geography?
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AP Central - Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care?

AP Central - Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care? | Geography | Scoop.it

The Nature of Geography
Most everyone knows that history is the study of events through time. Basically, historians ask "What happened when and why then?" But many people, it seems, have a problem defining geography. One reason why geography has languished in the curricula ...


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, August 5, 2015 4:08 AM

Some very interesting definitions about 'Geography' and 'Why Geography?' in this article..." all geographic teaching and learning should relate to the human need to know, emphasizing "Why care?" The definition presented here identifies in simple, easily taught, and easily learned terms the extreme complexity of geography.

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Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care?

Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care? | Geography | Scoop.it
One reason why geography has languished in the curricula of many American schools is that so few people understand the nature of the discipline or its relevance to our everyday lives. What is geography? What is its unique perspective? What do geographers do? Why is geography important? Why should we teach (and learn) geography in the schools? These are questions that have gone largely unanswered in American education. This brief essay presents an easily taught, understood, and remembered definition of geography.

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Yolanta Krawiecki's curator insight, August 7, 2015 5:29 PM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education.

Jade ten Kate's curator insight, August 7, 2015 11:01 PM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education.

Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, August 8, 2015 12:14 AM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.


Tagseducation, K12geography education.

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12 Maps That Changed the World

12 Maps That Changed the World | Geography | Scoop.it
Is there such a thing as a perfect map?

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Start of the Year Videos

"A great Florida teacher produced this video.  Visit his course website for additional incredible resources."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:44 PM

APHG-Intro

D Langen's curator insight, August 22, 2014 9:31 AM

This is an excellent collection of videos to frame the study of geography.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:11 PM

course intro

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | Geography | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


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samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:53 PM

helps show the different perspectives of our world and how it has changed. also shows many different forms of mapping our world throughout time.

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:34 AM

UNIT 1 

This article discusses map projections and how they shape our perception of the world. Maps influence how we see the world, and could change the way we see it as well. These projections show us many different views of the Earth, which is very influential to our perspectives. This applies to unit 1 and its major concepts and underlying geographical perspective such as analyzing maps. 

Vicki S Albritton's curator insight, August 26, 2016 8:35 PM
What we see isn't always what is.
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Defining 'the South'

Defining 'the South' | Geography | Scoop.it

"The Southerners were considerably more certain of which states are their own. While the top few Midwest states barely pulled 80 percent of the vote, nearly 90 percent of respondents identified Georgia and Alabama as Southern, and more than 80 percent placed Mississippi and Louisiana in the South. South Carolina, Tennessee, Florida and North Carolina all garnered above 60 percent."


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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 10:40 PM

When I think of states that constitute as being a part of southern United States, I think of VA, NC, SC, GA, MS, AL, LA, TX, and FL. I never thought of KY as being a state a part of the south. Although its geographical location demonstrate it being relatively close to being in the south, I always thought of KY being a Midwest because of the weather similarities with states that are located in the Midwest.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 22, 2014 8:08 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspective of geography 

This map is a map of the p.o.v. of a surveyed group stating what they think the south is. They answered with suprising accuracy overall with some outliers. This map shows the stereotypes of the area that people deem it.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows a perceptual map of an area that isn't truly defined. This is a perceptual map because of its undefined borders and a level of accuracy at the personal level.

 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:37 PM
As someone who had a summer home in Orlando, Florida, and having friends and family there too, we would occasionally have the discussion what we considered the South. For myself, I always had the idea that the south was from North Carolina to Florida and from Florida as far west as Texas. As for the deep south, I would consider Alabama, Georgia and Florida to be the deep south. I have a friend currently stationed at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina and he considers NC and anything under to be the South.
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How classrooms look around the world — in 15 amazing photographs

How classrooms look around the world — in 15 amazing photographs | Geography | Scoop.it
From the poorest to the well-resourced.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 23, 2016 1:06 AM
Very interesting contrasts...

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Human Settlement Predictive Model

"Simulating climate conditions over the last 125,000 years and predicting how those changes would have allowed humans to spread around the globe, this video models human migration patterns." Read more: http://ow.ly/lWIp304qZEo


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 3:14 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 18, 12:11 AM
Some interesting modelling based on climate change. I wonder what it would look like based on something different? Cultural differences? What came first culture or climate?
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 9:02 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

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Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff?

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff? | Geography | Scoop.it
What is life like in the country projected to have the world's fastest-shrinking population?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 22, 2:24 PM

This is a good case-study to show how demographic decline coupled with economic decline, with exacerbate problems with a  consistent out-migration flow.   

 

Tags: Bulgaria, declining populationpopulationmigration.

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Disaster Mapping: Hurricane Irma, Mexico Earthquake and Bangladesh Floods

Disaster Mapping: Hurricane Irma, Mexico Earthquake and Bangladesh Floods | Geography | Scoop.it

This week has seen disasters and destruction on an unprecedented scale, and the HOT Community has activated to respond. Hurricane Irma is the largest Hurricane ever recorded, and has torn death and destruction through the Caribbean. Destruction on some islands is estimated at 95%, affecting the lives of 1.2 million so far, and on track to cause severe destruction across the entire Florida State, where mass evacuation is currently underway. Barbuda’s prime minister, Gaston Browne, described the damage as absolutely heart-wrenching. 'The island is literally under water and barely habitable,' Browne said. 'About 95% of properties are damaged, there is a serious threat of disease. Additionally, those already affected by Irma fear a second brutal battering by Hurricane Jose.'"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 11, 3:46 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are most vulnerable to natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  My students and I join OpenStreetMap (OSM) projects, especially when there is a major humanitarian need...it's a great way to make service learning and geospatial technologies come together. The projects that are marked urgent by the Red Cross are all in Haiti right now.  Here are is a video playlist that explains the project and how you can help if you are new to OpenStreetMap (OSM).

 

Tags: disasters, mapping, edtechSTEM, weather and climate.

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 8:55 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are most vulnerable to natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  My students and I join OpenStreetMap (OSM) projects, especially when there is a major humanitarian need...it's a great way to make service learning and geospatial technologies come together. The projects that are marked urgent by the Red Cross are all in Haiti right now.  Here are is a video playlist that explains the project and how you can help if you are new to OpenStreetMap (OSM).

 

Tags: disasters, mapping, edtechSTEM, weather and climate.

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10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex | Geography | Scoop.it
Roughly half the countries around the world experience low fertility rates, and some get pretty creative in how they encourage procreation.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 7, 7:23 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates. While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates. Denmark Russia Japan Romania Singapore South Korea India (Parsis community) Italy Hong Kong Spain
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 8:55 PM

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 1:21 PM
Examples of pro-natalist countries.
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Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise | Geography | Scoop.it
Federal maps help determine who on the coast must buy flood insurance, but many don't include the latest data. Maryland is now making its own flood maps, so homeowners can see if they're at risk.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 1, 10:55 PM

Geographic themes are overflowing (it was an unintended pun, but I'll just let that wash over you) in this podcast.  I suggest playing a game early in the year/semester called "find the geography."  What geographic theme/content areas will your students find in this podcast? 

 

Tagspodcast, mapping, cartography, climate change, environment, watercoastal,  urban, planningurban ecology.

M Sullivan's curator insight, August 6, 9:14 PM
Useful for Geographical Processes Unit of Inquiry
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Geology of the World of Game of Thones

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A fun way to imagine the geographic and geologic forces of nature, using Westeros as the topic.
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What can I do with a Geography Degree?

What can I do with a Geography Degree? | Geography | Scoop.it

"While it is easy to understand getting excited about maps, different cultures and environments, and even being better citizens through geography, it is harder to see how geographic knowledge can lead to good jobs or meaningful careers. In recent years, people have discovered that large numbers of societal problems have geographic dimensions, and that education and training in geography provides essential skills and knowledge for real-world problem solving. As a result, geography has become a necessary ingredient in hundreds of different jobs. This assortment of careers helps demonstrate the wide array of employment opportunities that exist for graduates with education in the field of geography. Within this publication, careers are divided into a number of different employment categories, including:

​Geography EducationEnvironmental GeographyGeospatial TechnologiesLand Use Planning
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Sally Egan's curator insight, February 7, 7:48 PM
Great for introducing the vocational relevance of geography.
Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 15, 3:04 PM
Geographic Concepts: Geographic Perspective and Geographic Skills And Careers
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, February 27, 10:36 AM
what can i do with a degree in geography? ALOT!
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APHG Promo Video

This is video is a great tool to drum up interest in an AP Human Geography course produced by David Burton.  See more promotional videos/start-of-the-year clips at http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1ec


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 3:33 PM

This is just one of my favorite "start of the year" videos.  I've compiled them for when you need to show the importance of geography, spatial thinking and geo-literacy.  Collectively, they show why taking geography courses is so important, useful and interesting. 

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG.

Sally Egan's curator insight, February 15, 4:11 PM
Love this video introducing the study of Geography. Its dramatic and diverse in the issues it introduces.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, May 31, 10:37 AM
Believe the hype
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The World's Newest (Official) Ocean

The World's Newest (Official) Ocean | Geography | Scoop.it

"The Southern Ocean extends from the coast of Antarctica north to 60 degrees south latitude. The Southern Ocean is now the fourth largest of the world's five oceans (after the Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and Indian Ocean, but larger than the Arctic Ocean). The International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) has  declared, named, and demarcated the Southern Ocean as a fifth, separate ocean."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 10:37 AM

Typically we define oceans and seas based on their borders with land as their most important characteristics.  Also, we rarely look at the bottom of the globe as the center of our global perspective.  Those are a few of the reasons why American students usually have never heard of the Southern Ocean, but Australian students see it as one of the world's main oceans.  

 

TagsOceaniaAntarctica, water, environment, physical.

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Election maps are telling you big lies about small things

Election maps are telling you big lies about small things | Geography | Scoop.it
In 2012, 160 counties cast about the same number of votes as the rest of the country. But, your run-of-the-mill election map won't show you that.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2016 10:42 AM

This is nothing new to most visitors to this site, but every four years we have a wonderful teaching moment to show how population density can change our interpretation of a map and the meaning of the data embedded in that map.  In preparation for next week, this article for the Washington Post as well as this one from the New York Times should help get students be better prepared for the onslaught of maps that we know are right around the corner, to properly assess and contextualize the geographic content in these maps.     

 

Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

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Map Projection Transitions

Map Projection Transitions | Geography | Scoop.it

"In some ways, all 2D maps of Earth are interrupted at some point, even if it’s just along the antimeridian at 180°. Interruptions are often in areas of less interest e.g. oceans for a land-focused map."


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Lilydale High School's curator insight, September 3, 2015 6:01 AM

New ways to see the world.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:33 AM

map projections

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:23 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations fromJason Davies mapping project.   

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How Eratosthenes calculated the Earth's circumference

"In the mid-20th century we began launching satellites into space that would help us determine the exact circumference of the Earth: 40,030 km. But over 2000 years earlier, a man in Ancient Greece came up with nearly the exact same figure using just a stick and his brain."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2016 1:19 PM

Eratosthenes is often referred to as the "father of geography" for creating meridians and parallels on his maps to organize global information, classifying climatic zones, and as shown in the video, calculating the circumference of the Earth. Plus, he coined the terms so he gets the credit. If you have never pondered the meaning of the word "geometry," the accomplishments of Eratosthenes will certainly show that the mathematical prowess was at the heart of expanding our collective geographic knowledge (additionally, here is a retro Carl Sagan in a video clip from Cosmos that inspired this clip).    

 

Tagsmapping, math, locationSTEM, historical.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, November 18, 2016 3:07 AM
How Eratosthenes calculated the Earth's circumference
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AP Human Geography Models and Theories

In depth Prezi covering all AP Human Geography Models and Theories by Liam Page.....Simple Version- http://tinyurl.com/q637dl8

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 27, 2014 11:27 AM

This shows us and describes all of the geographical models that are used within human geography. (This helped me to study for the AP test). These models help us conneect and understand the population of our world and patterns within it.