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Election maps are telling you big lies about small things

Election maps are telling you big lies about small things | Geography | Scoop.it
In 2012, 160 counties cast about the same number of votes as the rest of the country. But, your run-of-the-mill election map won't show you that.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 10:42 AM

This is nothing new to most visitors to this site, but every four years we have a wonderful teaching moment to show how population density can change our interpretation of a map and the meaning of the data embedded in that map.  In preparation for next week, this article for the Washington Post as well as this one from the New York Times should help get students be better prepared for the onslaught of maps that we know are right around the corner, to properly assess and contextualize the geographic content in these maps.     

 

Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

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Germany reunified 26 years ago, but some divisions are still strong

Germany reunified 26 years ago, but some divisions are still strong | Geography | Scoop.it

"While 75 percent of Germans who live in the east said that they considered their country's reunification a success, only half of western Germans agreed. With eastern and western Germans blaming each other for past mistakes over the past two years, that frustration has likely increased. Younger citizens, especially — who do not usually identify themselves with their area of origin as strongly anymore — have grown worried about the persistent skepticism on both sides. But where do those divisions come from? And how different are eastern and western Germany today?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 4, 5:04 PM

This series of 10 maps (and 1 satellite image) highlights many of the cultural and economic divisions between East and West, despite efforts to in the last 26 years to smooth out these discrepancies. The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come. 

 

Tags: Germany, industry, laboreconomichistorical, politicalborders.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, November 1, 11:25 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: This series of 10 maps (and 1 satellite image) highlights many of the cultural and economic divisions between East and West, despite efforts to in the last 26 years to smooth out these discrepancies. The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come.
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Why you're probably wrong about levels of immigration in your country

Why you're probably wrong about levels of immigration in your country | Geography | Scoop.it
In developed countries around the world, people think immigrant populations are much larger than they actually are.

 

Americans consistently mention immigration as one of the nation’s most pressing political concerns, and it has become a signature issue in the presidential campaign. But while many Americans consider immigration one of the biggest issues for the future president, surveys suggest that they also have little understanding of the scale of the problem. The United States wasn’t alone in this tendency to exaggerate.

 

Tags: migration, statistics, political.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 3, 2:26 AM

Global challenges: Population 

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Turkey’s New Maps Are Reclaiming the Ottoman Empire

Turkey’s New Maps Are Reclaiming the Ottoman Empire | Geography | Scoop.it
Erdogan’s aggressive nationalism is now spilling over Turkey’s borders, grabbing land in Greece and Iraq.

 

In the past few weeks, a conflict between Ankara and Baghdad over Turkey’s role in the liberation of Mosul has precipitated an alarming burst of Turkish irredentism. President Erdogan criticized the Treaty of Lausanne, which created the borders of modern Turkey, for leaving the country too small. Turkey won’t be annexing part of Iraq anytime soon, but this combination of irredentist cartography and rhetoric nonetheless offers some insight into Turkey’s current foreign and domestic policies and Ankara’s self-image.  The military interventions and confrontational rhetoric this nationalism inspires may worsen Turkey’s security and regional standing.

 

Tags: political, irredentism, culture, Turkey, historical, borders, empire, geopolitics.


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The Big Religion Comparison Chart

The Big Religion Comparison Chart | Geography | Scoop.it
The Big Religion Comparison Chart is a comparison chart of religions that compares the origins, beliefs, practices, and texts of world religions, small religions, ancient cults and new religious movements.

 

While I might disagree with a few of the nuances of their doctrinal generalizations, this is a great way to compare global religions with a similar framework (and to be fair, summarizing a 'world view' in few than two paragraphs is inherently problematic). 


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Dominique Kwon's curator insight, January 3, 2014 6:44 PM

This Chart is a convenient way for people to compare and contrast religions that are more common. This chart also tells the origin of the religion and the number of adherents. Which is talked about in much detail in Key Issue 1 of Chapter 6:Religions. 

-Dominique Kwon

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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 2015 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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World Religion Map

World Religion Map | Geography | Scoop.it
The incredibly detailed map of the world's religions shows what the biggest religion is by census area in each country, along with its level of support.

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Emma Lewis's curator insight, April 2, 11:40 AM

there are many religions in the world, but there are only a few very widespread religions. There are many religions only existing in 1 or two places and a few that exist all around the world. EL

 

Tags: culture, religion.

Makenzie Geiger's curator insight, April 4, 10:11 AM

Mapping religion can be incredibly problematic, but this map (hi-res here) uses the best data available for each country.  Examine some of the regional maps (Asia, Europe, North America, Oceania); what patterns are interesting/surprising to you? 

Since I am a Christian of course I would want my religion to be mostly populated however I know that everyone has different beliefs. To me this map is very interesting because it not only gives a visual representation of different religions around the world but also gives facts about them. 

Tags: culture, religion.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, April 7, 10:17 AM
I believe that this is very helpful among people wondering about and or learning about the distribution of religion throughout the world. 
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iScore5 APHG


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 26, 2015 9:00 AM

iScore5, the app for AP Human Geography is now available in the Apple Store for $4.99. With five levels of questions at increasing difficulty, bonus and double bonus rounds and a study mode with extensive vocabulary, APHG students and teachers alike will find this a great test prep resource and a fun and engaging way to help students earn that 5 (open disclosure--I was a part of the team that developed content for the app, but am NOT receiving any money for promoting it.  I'm sharing it because I'm excited about this new resource).  


Tags: APHG, teacher training, edtech.

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 27, 2015 9:59 AM

just an option

Dustin Fowler's curator insight, March 27, 2015 10:16 AM

For 5 bucks?  Might be worth looking into.  Especially if you have a class set of iPads. 

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Which Countries Have Shrinking Populations?

How Japan's Economy Is Destroying Its Youth http://bit.ly/23eayt5 Subscribe! http://bitly.com/1iLOHml With global population rising, some countries ar
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How classrooms look around the world — in 15 amazing photographs

How classrooms look around the world — in 15 amazing photographs | Geography | Scoop.it
From the poorest to the well-resourced.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 23, 1:06 AM
Very interesting contrasts...

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What This 2012 Map Tells Us About America, and the Election

What This 2012 Map Tells Us About America, and the Election | Geography | Scoop.it
History, race, religion, identity, geography: The 2012 election county-level map has many stories to tell, including about the 2016 race.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 18, 2:25 PM

The coverage of this election feels less objective than in past years (maybe that's just my perception, but that is why I've shared less electoral resources than in past years).  This article show's good map analysis and electoral patterns without much of any ideological or partisan analysis of the political platforms.  

 

Tags: electoral, political, mapping.

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Women's rights country by country - interactive

Women's rights country by country - interactive | Geography | Scoop.it
Which countries have laws preventing violence? Which legislate for gender equality? And which countries allow abortion? Using World Bank and UN data we offer a snapshot of women's rights across the globe

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The Autumnal Equinox

The Autumnal Equinox | Geography | Scoop.it

"In the Northern Hemisphere, the fall equinox marks the first day of fall (autumn) in what we call astronomical seasons. There's also another, more common definition of when the seasons start, namely meteorological definitions, which are based on average temperatures rather that astronomical events.  Equinoxes are opposite on either side of the equator, so the autumnal (fall) equinox in the Northern Hemisphere is the spring (vernal) equinox in the Southern Hemisphere and vice versa."

 

Tags: Sun, seasonal, space.


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ROCAFORT's curator insight, September 23, 2:46 AM
The Autumnal Equinox
Sally Egan's curator insight, October 6, 9:40 PM
Simple explanation of the Equinox.
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Data USA

Data USA | Geography | Scoop.it
The most comprehensive visualization of U.S. public data. Data USA provides an open, easy-to-use platform that turns data into knowledge.

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Lilydale High School's curator insight, November 5, 6:23 PM
Data about many aspects of places, industry, education in the US.
ROCAFORT's curator insight, November 18, 3:05 AM
Data USA
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What to Know About Diwali, the Festival of Lights

What to Know About Diwali, the Festival of Lights | Geography | Scoop.it

"Diwali, one of the biggest holidays in Indian culture, is a five-day festival of lights celebrated worldwide by Hindus, Sikhs and Jains. This year, the traditional day of Diwali falls on Oct. 30, though celebrations span the entire week leading up to and following the holiday, which marks the triumph of good over evil."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 31, 4:51 PM

This video provides a good introduction to the incredibly important South Asia holiday of Diwali. 

 

Tags: culture, India, Hinduism, South Asia, festivals.

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New Human Geography Video Series

Miriam Nielsen will be teaching Human Geography on Crash Course. We'll talk about what Human Geography isn't, and what it is. Let's talk about humans in the context of our world.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 13, 1:40 PM

Yesterday the popular video channel Crash Course announced that they would be producing a new series dedicated to human geography, much to the delight of APHG teachers everywhere (some wished it were John Green hosting the series, but I say we should give Miriam Nielsen a chance to win us over).  I'm sure that as more videos are produced, I will tag them and include them here on Geography Education.    

 

Tags: APHG, teacher training, edtech, video.

Stephen Briddon's curator insight, October 14, 11:47 AM
Whoot
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The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts

The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts | Geography | Scoop.it

"These seven maps and charts, visualized by The Washington Post, will help you understand how diverse other parts of the world are in terms of languages."

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.


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Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 AM

The world is extremely diverse in its spread of native languages. Yet only a handful are commonly spoken by the majority of the world, about 2/3. Over half of the world's languages are expected to go extinct because of the extreme diversity and the minimal distribution which means that in some places almost every person speaks a completely different language and many are dying as their last speakers do not pass it on to their children.

 

This article is relates to cultural patterns and processes through the geographic spread of languages around the globe and the increasing acculturation that causes the loss of many of these languages in our increasingly globalized world.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 PM

Its interesting to see just how many people speak the languages we speak everyday, and to see just how many people DONT speak it.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:34 AM

It is amazing to see all main languages in perspective to the world. Mandarine holding the top spot with 1.39 Billion surprises me but at the same time doesn't. There are 1.3 billion people living there in the first place.

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:06 PM

This is also a good introductory video for the Religion unit.  It will at least give students a general overview of the major world religions as a baseline of information to reference when diving deeper into the unit content.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 10:10 AM

unit 3

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Environmental Determinism: Crash Course #1

Today we're talking about how Human Geography has been practiced in the past, how it hitched its wagon to some really bad ideas, and how that kind of thinking still persists in the world today. Basically, we're starting with a lesson in how not to Human Geographize. Which I don't think is a real word.
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Why Somaliland is not a recognized state

Why Somaliland is not a recognized state | Geography | Scoop.it

"SOMALILAND, a slim slice of Somali-inhabited territory on the southern shore of the Gulf of Aden, ticks almost all the boxes of statehood. It has its own currency, a reasonably effective bureaucracy and a trained army and police force. But it has yet to receive official recognition from a single foreign government in the years since it declared independence in 1991. To the outside world, it is an autonomous region of Somalia, subject to the Somali Federal Government (SFG) in Mogadishu. Why is it not a state?  Throughout the post-independence era, geopolitics in Africa has tended to respect 'colonial borders', i.e. the borders laid down by European colonial powers in the 19th century. Across the continent, there have been only two significant alterations to the colonial map since the 1960s: the division of Eritrea from Ethiopia, in 1993; and South Sudan from Sudan, in 2011."


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 19, 2015 1:35 PM

unit 4

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 19, 2015 1:35 PM

unit 4

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:55 PM

Like many new developing countries, it is hard to overcome the hardships to prove that you deserve to be recognized as a new nation. Being recognized as a true nation means that there is political and economic stability within a country. The area where Somaliland is located is very unstable. Its parent nation, Somalia is very unstable. For example, in Somalia, there are pirates who hijack mariners and take them and the vessel hostage. Stability within a country is a major aspect for the international community to look at to recognize new countries.

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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | Geography | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 2015 11:15 AM

This article links with Unit Three through "language and communication". These 23 maps range from the history of languages, which languages connect with which, common languages in certain places, different phrases used in the same country for the same thing, and more. Looking at maps to spatially see language helps when trying to understand how the world communicates. One of the maps that I found interesting was the "New York tweets by language". It shows how diverse that city is, and how people are still preserving their native language in a English prominent country.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:00 PM

Unit 2:

Shows how many languages are actually closely related. Whether or not they sound the same or are located in similar regions, many share the same origins. For example: many words in Spanish and English are the same due to their similar roots. 

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The world’s most spoken languages

The world’s most spoken languages | Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 17, 11:31 AM

This infographic is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.  Since this only counts one language per person, mother tongues are listed.  Consequently, lingua franca's such as English and France are smaller than you might have presumed them to be.  

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, October 8, 2:39 AM
The world’s most spoken languages
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Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East

Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East | Geography | Scoop.it

"Without trying to defend or absolve U.S. policy, then, it is worth stepping back to ask what shared historical experiences might have left these four countries — Iraq, Syria, Libya and Yemen — particularly at risk of violent collapse. The following maps help highlight how, at various points over the past century, historical circumstances conspired, in an often self-reinforcing way, to bolster the stability of some states in the region while undermining that of others."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 4:31 PM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

Kelly Bellar's curator insight, October 22, 9:30 AM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

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Why America’s ‘nones’ left religion behind

Why America’s ‘nones’ left religion behind | Geography | Scoop.it
With the percentage of U.S. adults who do not identify with a religious group growing, we asked these people to explain, in their own words, why they left.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2:31 PM

The United States' population is becoming increasingly secularized.  The U.S. used to be predominantly a white, Christian country but that is no longer the case.  As religion becomes less of a factor in the lives of many individuals, it also has larger cultural ramifications. 

 

Tags: culturereligionUSA, Christianity.

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The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race

The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race | Geography | Scoop.it

"Forced to choose between limiting population or trying to increase food production, we chose the latter and ended up with starvation, warfare, and tyranny. Hunter-gatherers practiced the most successful and longest-lasting life style in human history. In contrast, we're still struggling with the mess into which agriculture has tumbled us, and it's unclear whether we can solve it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 22, 2:32 PM

Jared Diamond wrote this highly controversial essay back in the 80's and it still can elicit strong reactions from anthropologists, geographers, historians, and other scholars.  This is a good reading to give students during an agricultural unit.  This can get students to question many of the assumptions about humanity that they probably never knew they had (Diamond challenged the mainstream progressivist position).

 

Questions to Ponder: What is the progressivist view?  What were the negative impacts that early agriculture had on human health?  What social problems does Diamond attribute to agriculture?  What evidence would you present to argue against Diamond's position?

 

Tagsagriculturefolk culturestechnologyindigenous.

Eben Lenderking's curator insight, October 12, 3:07 AM

Is it too late to reprogram ourselves?