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Thinking Green in Pittsburgh

Thinking Green in Pittsburgh | Geography | Scoop.it

"Pittsburgh, called 'hell with the lid taken off' in the 19th century because of its industrial filth, is now an academic leader in the green movement."


Via Seth Dixon
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Bri Coins's comment, September 12, 2013 7:16 PM
This is awesome! A city coming together to make it a green and better place? Why arent all cities doing this? I remember learning Pittsburgh being one of the dirtiest and industrial based cities, and now to read that its a better place. I think more cities need to come together as they said and stop competing with each other over money and make cities better for the citizens.
Drake Peterson's comment, September 12, 2013 8:06 PM
I think this is an outstanding article. Pittsburgh especially being known for their production of steel and coal, which is very harmful to the atmosphere. But now the city is taking their image and turning it into something green. Which is good for them and good for the world
harish magan's comment, September 14, 2013 4:25 AM
If this city and its governing body can do it any other metro city can also follow suit.Only thing is to take action and act on it. people can ask their respective city council to initiate efforts in this regard . If their citizen also take interest and raise their voice for this concept lot can happen soon.
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The Geography of Jobs: Smart Policies Are Good, but Oil Is Better

The Geography of Jobs: Smart Policies Are Good, but Oil Is Better | Geography | Scoop.it
How Texas and North Dakota won the recovery (The geography of jobs in America: How Texas and North Dakota won the economic recovery http://t.co/9Q3SnS8pA4)...
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Geography in the News: Endangered Mountain Ecosystem – News ...

Geography in the News: Endangered Mountain Ecosystem – News ... | Geography | Scoop.it
By Saskia van de Gevel, Assistant Professor, Appalachian Tree Ring Lab, Department of Geography and Planning, & Mark Spond, Ph.D., Liaison to the Blue Ridge Parkway, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28607.
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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | Geography | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


Via Seth Dixon
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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:34 AM

This map shows how linguistically diverse the United States is today. This map reminded me of one of the slides that we went over in class about how in the Northwest Region the predominant language was German and now it is mainly English, with some German and Native American languages still spoken in certain parts.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 10:29 PM

This data is very interesting because you can see that most of these statements speak Spanish. I noticed that most people who speak another language at home (in this case Spanish)  besides English are located in the south western of United States. I wonder if this has something to do with people who immigrated to U.S  from south America.