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The Great Language Game

The Great Language Game | Geography | Scoop.it
Challenge yourself to identify some seventy languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.

Via Seth Dixon
Christopher Johannsen's insight:

So much fun!

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Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 11:21 AM
This certainly was interesting! It was challenging to identify some languages, and others you could figure out right away. Some of them I had never even heard of! Being exposed to a few languages growing up I thought I would be better at this, but I was very wrong. It is a little disappointing knowing that many people are not exposed to the many languages our world has to offer. It is also disheartening to hear many people get offended when people do not speak English here, when really America has no national dialect. I know that many schools require students to take a different language in high school, but it only the more common ones that are becoming popular in the U.S. (Spanish, French, Portuguese, etc.). Maybe some day children will become more exposed to the many different languages that have grown across the globe.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 8:59 AM

A game where you can test your knowledge of global tongues only by sound.

The knowledge of languages is important in movement especially for migrants and immigrants and participators in global trade.

Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 1:52 PM

Make sure you look up the languages that you don't know to determine where they're spoken.

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The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | Geography | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.

 

BILL GATES, in his foundation’s annual letter, declared that “the terms ‘developing countries’ and ‘developed countries’ have outlived their usefulness.” He’s right. If we want to understand the modern global economy, we need a better vocabulary.

Mr. Gates was making a point about improvements in income and gross domestic product; unfortunately, these formal measures generate categories that tend to obscure obvious distinctions. Only when employing a crude “development” binary could anyone lump Mozambique and Mexico together.

It’s tough to pick a satisfying replacement. Talk of first, second and third worlds is passé, and it’s hard to bear the Dickensian awkwardness of “industrialized nations.” Forget, too, the more recent jargon about the “global south” and “global north.” It makes little sense to counterpose poor countries with “the West” when many of the biggest economic success stories in the past few decades have come from the East.

All of these antiquated terms imply that any given country is “developing” toward something, and that there is only one way to get there.

It’s time that we start describing the world as “fat” or “lean.”


Via Seth Dixon
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Joanne Wegener's curator insight, March 7, 2:03 AM

Fat or Lean - what sort of world do we live in

An interesting discussion on the way we perceive and label the world.

Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 11, 7:15 AM

Hoy en día poca claridad de dónde exactamente queda y quiénes son? 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 7:46 AM

UPDATE: this article (from the Atlantic) on the exact same concept would supplement the NY Times article nicely.  

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Population Reference Bureau

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Population Reference Bureau | Geography | Scoop.it

The 2013 World Population Data Sheet lists all geopolitical entities with populations of 150,000 or more and all members of the UN. These include sovereign states, dependencies, overseas departments, and some territories whose status or boundaries may be undetermined or in dispute.

 

More developed regions, following the UN classification, comprise all of Europe and North America, plus Australia, Japan, and New Zealand.

 

All other regions and countries are classified as less developed.

 

The least developed countries consist of 49 countries with especially low incomes, high economic vulnerability, and poor human development indicators; 34 of these countries are in sub-Saharan Africa, 14 in Asia, and one in the Caribbean.

 

The criteria and list of countries, as defined by the United Nations, can be found at http://www.unohrlls.org/en/ldc/25/. ;

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Seth Dixon, Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 6:33 AM

The human popluation debate will always seem to be an issue. One can almost assume that the less developed countries are going to have the highest popluation but the most problems as well. A country that is classified as less developed are most definitely going to have low incomes due to the low number of jobs available, poor human development because there isn't enough people to be taking care of each other. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

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Gray whale dies bringing us a message — with stomach full of plastic trash

Gray whale dies bringing us a message — with stomach full of plastic trash | Geography | Scoop.it
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'Don’t pollute our sea:' Mass demo in Tokyo to ban nuclear energy (PHOTOS)

'Don’t pollute our sea:' Mass demo in Tokyo to ban nuclear energy (PHOTOS) | Geography | Scoop.it
Some 9,000 activists took to the streets of Tokyo on Sunday to protest nuclear power. The march comes as Japanese authorities are considering restarting the country’s nuclear reactors, which were shut down in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster.
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50,000 Bangladeshi garment workers strike over ‘inhuman’ wages

50,000 Bangladeshi garment workers strike over ‘inhuman’ wages | Geography | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of garment workers have downed tools and taken to the streets to urge the government for an increase in the minimum salary.
Christopher Johannsen's insight:

Quality of life, demographic factors, globalization... I like how this relates to those themes in the grade 8 geography curriculum. 

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Bhutan - The World's First 100% Organic Nation

Bhutan - The World's First 100% Organic Nation | Geography | Scoop.it
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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | Geography | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable. Leaving out the most obvious contenders, we've put together this gallery of cities around the world – see how many you can guess
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The Great Language Game

The Great Language Game | Geography | Scoop.it
Challenge yourself to identify some seventy languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.

Via Seth Dixon
Christopher Johannsen's insight:

So much fun!

more...
Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 11:21 AM
This certainly was interesting! It was challenging to identify some languages, and others you could figure out right away. Some of them I had never even heard of! Being exposed to a few languages growing up I thought I would be better at this, but I was very wrong. It is a little disappointing knowing that many people are not exposed to the many languages our world has to offer. It is also disheartening to hear many people get offended when people do not speak English here, when really America has no national dialect. I know that many schools require students to take a different language in high school, but it only the more common ones that are becoming popular in the U.S. (Spanish, French, Portuguese, etc.). Maybe some day children will become more exposed to the many different languages that have grown across the globe.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 8:59 AM

A game where you can test your knowledge of global tongues only by sound.

The knowledge of languages is important in movement especially for migrants and immigrants and participators in global trade.

Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 1:52 PM

Make sure you look up the languages that you don't know to determine where they're spoken.

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Nisga'a First Nation: This Land is My Land

Nisga'a First Nation: This Land is My Land | Geography | Scoop.it
Today, our Project Money visits the Nisga'a First Nation, the first Aboriginal group ready to approve ownership of private property.
Christopher Johannsen's insight:

"With every right comes a responsibility."

"The right to fish comes with the responsibility to take care of the water and the ecosystem."

The idea of collective ownership leading directly to collective responsibility is threatened in the Nisga First Nation. 

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Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions | Colossal

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2013 Winners and Honorable Mentions | Colossal | Geography | Scoop.it
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Excellent collection of artistic wildlife photos on an interesting art and visual culture website.

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The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | Geography | Scoop.it
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.
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Should we be worried?


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Overpulation not the main problem...overconsumption is....
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5 Million Farmers Sue Monsanto for $7.7 Billion

5 Million Farmers Sue Monsanto for $7.7 Billion | Geography | Scoop.it
Christopher Johannsen's insight:

When I first heard of terminator seeds I hoped that farmers and populations would rebel against this greedy unnatural manipulation of the cycle of life that has allowed self-sufficiency and small farms to prosper year after year. I love the image of the green giant standing with the farmers against the chemical giant Monsanto that has done so much harm.

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The TRUE Size Of Africa - An Erroneous Map Misled Us For 500 Years!

The TRUE Size Of Africa - An Erroneous Map Misled Us For 500 Years! | Geography | Scoop.it
Christopher Johannsen's insight:

A funny summary from the West Wing tv show of the wrongs of using the mercator projection - bring on the Peters...

Look out for the "what the h***" bomb dropped after about 2 1/2 minutes.

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National Geographic Found

National Geographic Found | Geography | Scoop.it
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Amazing collection of photos from the past 125 years....

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Geography Education

Geography Education | Geography | Scoop.it
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
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