Geography
6 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from The #Agvocate
Scoop.it!

Bananas are down, loyalty is lost

BANANA prices are falling – they’re now selling for under $8/kg.
You can probably hear the collective sigh of relief being breathed by mums around the country.


That school lunch staple is back on the shopping list – Praise be to the Lunchbox God.

 

New research by Nielsen Australia shows that when banana prices soared in the aftermath of Cyclone Yasi, banana household penetration fell from around 70 -75 per cent to as low as 20-25 per cent.


What that means in normal English is that usually 75 per cent of households buy bananas but when the price/kg rose to $15 because the cyclone wiped out most of the North Queensland plantations, only 25per cent of Australia households bought them.
We’re a fickle customer and we decided to buy other fruit instead – strawberries, apples, pears, oranges and grapes were the big winners … apparently.


Lately I’ve spent many hours thinking about the price of fruit and veg … I’m married to a vegetable farmer so it affects our household budget a bit more than usual.
After my many hours of reflection what I can’t understand is why we – as a nation – are so price sensitive when it comes to our fresh produce?


Why do we stop buying certain fruit and veg when the price gets a bit higher than normal, yet we think nothing of blowing $20 at the local fast food joint?


Do you know the average price of a pack of Tim Tams? What did that Big Mac cost you last week? How much was that can of coke you bought yesterday?


Nope, didn’t think you’d know. So why then can we regurgitate the weekly fruit and vegetable prices with very little effort.


Onions are selling for $4.99/kg – daylight robbery.


Via AusFarmFwd
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from How Earth Made Us - Wind
Scoop.it!

Cyclone Yasi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi /ˈjɑːs/ was a powerful tropical cyclone that made landfall in northern Queensland, Australia in the early hours of 3 February, 2011, causing severe damage to affected areas. Yasi originated from a tropical low near Fiji. The system intensified to a Category 3 cyclone at about 5 p.m. AEST (07:00 UTC) on 31 January 2011.[1] Late on 1 February the cyclone strengthened to a Category 4 system, then early on 2 February, the cyclone intensified to a Category 5 system.[2]

According to Tropical Cyclone Advice Number 21, at 9pm AEST (11:00 UTC) the system was centred near 17°24′00″S 147°06′00″E / 17.40000°S 147.10000°E / -17.40000; 147.10000, "110 kilometres east of Innisfail and moving west southwest at 25 kilometres per hour," with a central pressure of 930 mbar (27 inHg).[3] The system had a well-defined eye and a dvorak intensity of T6.5.[4]

According to Tropical Cyclone Advice Number 24 at 11:54pm AEST (13:54 UTC), the large destructive core had commenced to cross the coast between Innisfail and Cardwell with a central pressure of 930 hectopascals and maximum 10-minute sustained winds of 215 km/h. Maximum 3-second gusts are estimated at 285 km/h, with these likely to affect an area spanning from Ingham to Cairns according to the Threat Map [5] for a period of 3–4 hours. The eye crossed the coastline at Mission Beach just before 12:00am AEST (14:00 UTC) and passed over Tully soon after.


Via Hannah Burnett
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Aquaculture Research
Scoop.it!

100K Escapee barramundi offer clues - ABC Rural

100K Escapee barramundi offer clues - ABC Rural | Geography | Scoop.it
Researchers in north Queensland are using DNA technology to investigate the effects of a mass fish escape.

Professor Dean Jerry, from James Cook University, says the ecological consequences of the escape of fish from farms and dams are not yet known.

But when up to 100,000 barramundi were lost from a North Queensland fish farm destroyed in Cyclone Yasi more than two years ago, it presented a unique opportunity to learn about the impacts and improve aquaculture practices.

A research team has been working with recreational and commercial fishers in order to extract DNA from the fins of fish caught in the Hinchinbrook Channel, near Cardwell.

Professor Jerry says DNA parentage analysis is then used to determine if fish have derived from broodstock parents known to have been used to breed the fish stocked into the farm


Via Global Aqua Link
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Natural Hazards
Scoop.it!

Yasi: One Year On | Queensland | The Australian

Yasi: One Year On | Queensland | The Australian | Geography | Scoop.it
New reports, analysis, multimedia and graphics about the impact and aftermath of tropical Cyclone Yasi on the north Queensland coast.

Via Denelda Bolt
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

Great Barrier Reef's condition declined from moderate to poor in 2011

Great Barrier Reef's condition declined from moderate to poor in 2011 | Geography | Scoop.it

An alarming set of reports on the condition of the Great Barrier Reef published on Wednesday say its overall condition in 2011 declined from moderate to poor, and highlights that reef-wide coral cover has declined by 50% since 1985.

The series of reports blame part of the reef's poor health in 2011 on extreme weather conditions including tropical cyclone Yasi, and high rainfall which resulted in "higher than average discharge" from a number of river catchments runoffs.


Via SustainOurEarth
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Human rights
Scoop.it!

Cyclone spares Australia cities

Cyclone spares Australia cities | Geography | Scoop.it
Populous areas of the Queensland state of Australia have largely been spared the brunt of Cyclone Yasi.  -More- 
Via Jeff Makana
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Rainforests, Waterfalls, Rivers, Lakes & Oceans
Scoop.it!

Bid to rebuild rainforest after Yasi | Courier Mail

Bid to rebuild rainforest after Yasi | Courier Mail | Geography | Scoop.it
SEVERE Tropical Cyclone Yasi carved a destructive path across North Queensland but a tree-planting project may hold the key to saving the state's ancient rainforests.
Via Crescentrating
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from How Earth Made Us - Wind
Scoop.it!

Cyclone Yasi destroyed 150 homes - ABC News

Cyclone Yasi destroyed 150 homes - ABC News | Geography | Scoop.it
Cyclone Yasi destroyed almost 150 homes and left another 650 uninhabitable, preliminary figures show.

Via Hannah Burnett
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Australasian Hazards and Disasters
Scoop.it!

Australia: Surviving Yasi due to planning and not 'miracle', says top ...

Tropical Cyclone Yasi crossed the Australian mainland at midnight local time on Wednesday, but despite its category-5 strength, there were no reports of serious injuries or fatalities, according to a situation update from the ...

Via scott charlton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Hurricanes
Scoop.it!

Powerful cyclone Yasi hits Queensland in Australia

Powerful cyclone Yasi hits Queensland in Australia | Geography | Scoop.it
Australian authorities have warned people to take shelter with a powerful cyclone expected to hit the northern state of Queensland shortly. Winds have already begun to pick up and people are being told to stay off the streets.
Via Aaron Treadway
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Midnight in Jet-Lag city
Scoop.it!

Australia: Surviving Yasi due to planning and not 'miracle', says top ...

Tropical Cyclone Yasi crossed the Australian mainland at midnight local time on Wednesday, but despite its category-5 strength, there were no reports of serious injuries or fatalities, according to a situation update from the ...

Via scott charlton, AttractiveHealthcare
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Tourism Today & Tomorrow
Scoop.it!

QLD tourism’s bounce back

QLD tourism’s bounce back | Geography | Scoop.it
A year on from Queensland’s devastating floods and cyclone Yasi, tourism is bouncing back in the sunshine state as operators are resilient in improving their business to attract visitors in greater nu...

Via Paul Sloan
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Natural Hazards
Scoop.it!

Yasi: One Year On | Queensland | The Australian

Yasi: One Year On | Queensland | The Australian | Geography | Scoop.it
New reports, analysis, multimedia and graphics about the impact and aftermath of tropical Cyclone Yasi on the north Queensland coast.

Via Denelda Bolt
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Soggy Science
Scoop.it!

Sail-World.com - Coral rebirth - Baby corals are blooming on the Great Barrier Reef

Sail-World.com - Coral rebirth - Baby corals are blooming on the Great Barrier Reef | Geography | Scoop.it
Amid the wreckage left behind by cyclone Yasi baby corals are blooming on the Great Barrier Reef.

Via Grant W. Graves
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from How Earth Made Us - Wind
Scoop.it!

The economic impact of the floods and Yasi

As you might expect, Cyclone Yasi will compound the impact of the December and January floods in Queensland.

Via Hannah Burnett
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashley James Flockhart from Australasian Hazards and Disasters
Scoop.it!

Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi

Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi | Geography | Scoop.it
Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi...

Via Denelda Bolt, scott charlton
more...
No comment yet.