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Education World: Five Times Five: Five Activities for Teaching Geography's Five Themes

Education World: Five Times Five: Five Activities for Teaching Geography's Five Themes | Geography | Scoop.it
Serve up a well-balanced nutrition unit! A bunch of activities to pick from!
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Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands

Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands | Geography | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com KEYSTONE PIPELINE AND CANADIAN TAR SANDS CONTROVERSY Supporters and protesters continue to lobby both the White House and U.S.

Via Neal G. Lineback, Seth Dixon
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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 22, 2014 4:01 PM

This controversial pipeline project would allow the transportation of crude oil from Alberta, Canada's Athabasca Oil Sands to the United State's Gulf Cost.  This proves to be a difficult feat.  Extracting oil from this source is very difficult since it is also mixed with clay and sand, making it very dirty.  Transportation of this dirty substance through the pipeline would be equally as hard and risky since there is a risk that the oil could corrode the pipe.  This poses severe environmental and safety risks.  This pipeline passes through an international border and seven U.S. states which play huge roles in feeding the country.  A pipeline passing through this area could easily pollute the Mississippi River Basin, which is the main water source for the people and the crops located in the central area of the country.  There have also been cases where corroded pipelines have allowed widespread fires to occur, which is a possibility here.  Extracting oil from this source would allow North America to be self-reliant, however, there are many drawbacks to creating such a huge pipeline which originates in such dirty oil sources.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:57 PM

The three main arguments against Keystone XL is, one; making liquid fuel from tar sands keeps the United States dependent on a very polluting source of energy. Instead of moving towards cleaner sources of energy, the US would continue being one of the highest in CO2 in emissions. Secondly; the pipeline  has risks that include spills because the tar sands oil could corrode the pipe line and leak. And thirdly, the oil from keystone could be sold to foreign markets instead of staying domestic. Although the US needs to start being less dependent on foreign oil the Keystone pipeline is not the way to do so. Oil itself is not a permanent solution, it will run out and it continues to harm the environment. This pipeline defiantly poses more risks than anyone should be comfortable with.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:43 PM

The Keystone Pipeline is a pipeline bringing natural gas from Canada into the States. Many politicians are against the XL project to connect the pipeline from the Tar Sands in Alberta to the Gulf Coast. However, there has been much rebuff from the Democrats within the Congress and the White House.

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Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders

Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders | Geography | Scoop.it
Pretty wild, right? It's a map of Pangea — a supercontinent that formed roughly 300 million years ago — mapped with contemporary geopolitical borders.

Via Seth Dixon
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Padmanabhan Jaikumar's comment, June 5, 2013 12:57 AM
may be answers to many questions
Magnus Gustafsson's comment, June 12, 2013 2:37 AM
Tnanks! This map makes it easier to understand our world right now.
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:27 PM

My favorite part about this map has to be its unintentionaly demographich connecter (If that even makes sense) for example along the south east part of the united states their are alot of latin americans and on this map the two continents are brought closer to each other to match the cultural demogaphic. To continue this the east coast and dixie are have a massive african american population. and again the african continent is brought close to people who have ancestreal roots to it. I know that pangea is not the reason why each culture settled in its respetive area just funny how well that worked out.

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Languages May Be Shaped By Geography - Yahoo! News

Smithsonian (blog)
Languages May Be Shaped By Geography
Yahoo! News
The way different languages sound may depend on the geography of the landscape on which they're spoken, new research suggests.
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What Are the Five Themes of Geography?

What Are the Five Themes of Geography? | Geography | Scoop.it
The five themes of geography were created in 1984 by the National Council for Geographic Education and the Association of American Geographers. Learn more about the five themes of geography in this video lesson.
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Katie Elizabeth's curator insight, August 8, 2013 1:22 PM

Not really *getting* the 5 Themes and their purpose in the study of geography?  Check out this video.

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, March 22, 2015 9:57 AM

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives of Geography

 

This scoop explains the Five Themes of Geography. They consist of Location, Place, Movement, Region, and Human- Environment Interaction. This article does a good job explaining them and showing why they are the main themes.

 

This relates to Human Geography because these five themes are what geography is all about and what geography studies. Without these themes geography would not only not exist but the boundaries would never be defined.

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Tips for the Google Maps Guessing Game

Tips for the Google Maps Guessing Game | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Nicholas Pringle's curator insight, June 3, 2013 7:44 AM

This has great potential for a education geography tool. Very creative!

fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 9:00 AM
hshahda´~
Todd Parsons's curator insight, October 28, 2013 5:41 PM

Say goodbye to getting anything done...

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Geography | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


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Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 3:04 PM

I've seen this collection of maps a number of times before, but they are just as interesting and informative every time I look at them. It's really a fun exercise in seeing what phrases you use or how you pronounce certain words as opposed to the rest of the country. As a Rhode Islander, the bubbler/water fountain divide was of particular interest to me. I also found it funny that I have the vaguely Western/Midwestern tendency of calling "rotaries" (or what are traditionally called rotaries in my area), "roundabouts". This is especially curious to me, because I generally tend to think of that term as a British one. Could this possibly mean that a lot of British immigrants settled in the Western/Midwestern United States? Or am I just mistaken and buying into a poorly informed stereotype about British people?

 

Whatever the case, these maps are very informative and say a lot about the linguistic differences that occur even within one country. Now granted, the United States is a large country, so there is bound to be a good amount of variation. But it's still fascinating to me just how much variety there can be. The fact that when traveling, your use or pronunciation of a certain word or phrase can immediately identify you as an out-of-towner is very interesting. This is yet another example of the importance of doing your own research in order to avoid making incorrect assumptions. Just because all of the people within a geographic border may live in the same country, it does not mean that their dialects or colloquialisms are all the same. It does not even necessarily mean that they speak the same language. Different immigrant groups (because almost no country is impervious to immigration) settle in different areas and this ends up contributing (in part) to the different dialects and expressions that one finds within geographic borders.