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Boundary conditions

Boundary conditions | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
PULL a spring, let it go, and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back until, quite suddenly, it won't....

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Joel Barker's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:56 AM

A useful discussion on limits of the planet

Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 8:23 AM

This is an interesting article discussing the limits that the Earth's physical systems have and the importance not exceeding any tipping point that could destabilize the planet if we "overstrech the springs."

Angus Henderson's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:49 AM

An interesting counter-balance to the work of the Planetary Boundaries group. 

Geography in IB @BIS
Geography and change
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Europe and Central Asia: How does inequality between men and women affect development? - YouTube

This video illustrates the possible impact of gender inequality on development in Europe and Central Asia. Find out more about the data and indicators used t...
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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 10:31 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the theme of population pyramids because it gives a compelling explanation of how to interpret population pyramids and why they are significant for extrapolating into the future.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 6:54 PM

This video proves how population pyramids can predict the current and future state of a country such as Rwanda.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:41 PM

Population statistics help show past, present, and future issues and concerns of certain areas ranging from health to women's' issues.

The movement of people in and out of areas affect population statistics and the landscape of areas either positively of negatively.

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'Indonesia's deforestation is a disaster for the planet' - audio slideshow

'Indonesia's deforestation is a disaster for the planet' - audio slideshow | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
Award-winning Hong Kong photographer and photojournalist Paul Hilton's latest series of images looks at the impact of deforestation on Indonesia's wildlife
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Jack Straw, migrants from eastern Europe have done a lot for Britain

Jack Straw, migrants from eastern Europe have done a lot for Britain | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
The Labour politician says the scale of eastern European immigration has been a 'spectacular mistake'.
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7 ridiculous restrictions on women’s rights around the world

7 ridiculous restrictions on women’s rights around the world | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
It's not just driving: women in some countries aren't allowed to leave the house without their husband's permission.
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World's tallest dam approved by Chinese environmental officials

World's tallest dam approved by Chinese environmental officials | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
Authorities push forward plans for 314 metre-high dam on Dadu river which would affect rare plants and fish
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Men Still Making WAY More Than Women, New Data Show

Men Still Making WAY More Than Women, New Data Show | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
Women have made huge strides in the workplace but still are falling short when it comes to pay.
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As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts

As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it

"The nation's fertility rate has slipped below replacement levels partly because of the recession and a decline in immigration. That's raising concern about the nation's future."


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Brett Sinica's comment, April 23, 2013 3:11 PM
These stats are hard to take in, because it seems like even though birth rates are considered to be dropping, the country’s total population continues to rise, and fast. Immigration probably plays a major role in the adding of new citizens, though just because birth rates are decreasing it shouldn’t necessarily mean a bad thing. With a slow increase of people, there could possibly be drops in the unemployment rate, or even poverty level at a big stretch. With fewer people in the country, it could mean less competition among others, leaving more options for people to pursue. It says at the end of the article that, “there are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” This may hold true to an extent, but look at China for example. Their population is the largest in the world, containing roughly 20 of the 30 most polluted cities and being the top consumer of energy. Though the country has an unemployment level which is half of ours, they must put in place family planning methods such as the “one-child policy” to hope for better population control. If I know the United States, I highly doubt they would ever resort to such measures, unless the government wants uproars. So maybe I’m optimistic about the birth rate drops, but it shouldn’t be too much of a problem. Maybe we should rid of the self-checkouts and automated answering machines and slowdown in technology so we don’t find ourselves in a situation that’d become too hard to handle.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 2:48 PM
This decline in birth rates is largely due to the recession; people don’t want to have children because they can’t afford the care. We need to have a balance in our population. Having one age group, like elderly people, dominating over other generations can be a problem. Even though the birth rates are decreasing, our population is still growing at a steady rate. Immigrants trying to make a home for themselves and their families in the United States contribute in a big way to our population increase.
I think that when and if the economy bounces back, families will start to feel comfortable with their finances and the birth rate will spike. Yet, if the birth rate does get back to normalcy and the immigrants continue to come to this country maybe our population will see too much of an increase and overpopulation could be a problem. But I doubt our country will ever adopt the “one-child policy” currently in use in China, we will find some other way to control our population, whatever that may be.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:45 PM
The recession is a huge factor as to why the birth/fertility rate is dropping. It costs a lot of money to have a child and most people can’t afford to care for themselves never mind another baby. Even though the birth rate has been decreasing over the years, the population is still increasing due to immigration. With the birth rate decreasing the level of poverty could potentially decrease as well because there will not be an economic burden. I don’t think there should be too much of a concern about the birthrate dropping because once the economy returns to normal I’m sure people will want to expand their family. I do agree to a certain extent with the statement in the article: “Population growth leads to human innovation, and innovation leads to conservation ... There are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” Overpopulation, like in China, causes many issues, not just economically.
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Remittances: how much money do migrants send home? – interactive

Remittances: how much money do migrants send home? – interactive | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
Remittances have soared to record levels. Explore the World Bank's latest estimates of how much money is sent, and where
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Boundary conditions

Boundary conditions | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
PULL a spring, let it go, and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back until, quite suddenly, it won't....

Via Joel Barker, Seth Dixon
more...
Joel Barker's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:56 AM

A useful discussion on limits of the planet

Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 8:23 AM

This is an interesting article discussing the limits that the Earth's physical systems have and the importance not exceeding any tipping point that could destabilize the planet if we "overstrech the springs."

Angus Henderson's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:49 AM

An interesting counter-balance to the work of the Planetary Boundaries group. 

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Urban Areas and Income Inequality

Urban Areas and Income Inequality | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 3:51 PM

What do these maps tell you?


Tags: statistics, census, mapping.

Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:25 PM
The difference in incomes in this city is astronomical. Literally from one neighborhood to the next you can notice the difference.
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As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts

As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it

"The nation's fertility rate has slipped below replacement levels partly because of the recession and a decline in immigration. That's raising concern about the nation's future."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's comment, April 23, 2013 3:11 PM
These stats are hard to take in, because it seems like even though birth rates are considered to be dropping, the country’s total population continues to rise, and fast. Immigration probably plays a major role in the adding of new citizens, though just because birth rates are decreasing it shouldn’t necessarily mean a bad thing. With a slow increase of people, there could possibly be drops in the unemployment rate, or even poverty level at a big stretch. With fewer people in the country, it could mean less competition among others, leaving more options for people to pursue. It says at the end of the article that, “there are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” This may hold true to an extent, but look at China for example. Their population is the largest in the world, containing roughly 20 of the 30 most polluted cities and being the top consumer of energy. Though the country has an unemployment level which is half of ours, they must put in place family planning methods such as the “one-child policy” to hope for better population control. If I know the United States, I highly doubt they would ever resort to such measures, unless the government wants uproars. So maybe I’m optimistic about the birth rate drops, but it shouldn’t be too much of a problem. Maybe we should rid of the self-checkouts and automated answering machines and slowdown in technology so we don’t find ourselves in a situation that’d become too hard to handle.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 2:48 PM
This decline in birth rates is largely due to the recession; people don’t want to have children because they can’t afford the care. We need to have a balance in our population. Having one age group, like elderly people, dominating over other generations can be a problem. Even though the birth rates are decreasing, our population is still growing at a steady rate. Immigrants trying to make a home for themselves and their families in the United States contribute in a big way to our population increase.
I think that when and if the economy bounces back, families will start to feel comfortable with their finances and the birth rate will spike. Yet, if the birth rate does get back to normalcy and the immigrants continue to come to this country maybe our population will see too much of an increase and overpopulation could be a problem. But I doubt our country will ever adopt the “one-child policy” currently in use in China, we will find some other way to control our population, whatever that may be.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:45 PM
The recession is a huge factor as to why the birth/fertility rate is dropping. It costs a lot of money to have a child and most people can’t afford to care for themselves never mind another baby. Even though the birth rate has been decreasing over the years, the population is still increasing due to immigration. With the birth rate decreasing the level of poverty could potentially decrease as well because there will not be an economic burden. I don’t think there should be too much of a concern about the birthrate dropping because once the economy returns to normal I’m sure people will want to expand their family. I do agree to a certain extent with the statement in the article: “Population growth leads to human innovation, and innovation leads to conservation ... There are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” Overpopulation, like in China, causes many issues, not just economically.
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Is Obama about to blow his climate credentials? - opinion - 28 January 2013 - New Scientist

Is Obama about to blow his climate credentials? - opinion - 28 January 2013 - New Scientist | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
The US president could be poised to approve the doubling of imports of tar sands oil, one of the filthiest fuels on Earth, says Fred Pearce
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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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How Rich Countries Got Rich . . . And Why Poor Countries Stay Poor

How Rich Countries Got Rich . . . And Why Poor Countries Stay Poor | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
I have just finished reading How Rich Countries Got Rich . . . And Why Poor Countries Stay Poor by Erik Reinert. The book is interesting for it engages what should be the main question of economics...
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Forest change mapped by Google Earth

Forest change mapped by Google Earth | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
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Where’s the best place to be a woman?

Where’s the best place to be a woman? | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
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One Guy With A Marker Just Made The Global Warming Debate Completely Obsolete

One Guy With A Marker Just Made The Global Warming Debate Completely Obsolete | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
Doing the math for the human race never seemed easier.
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Afghan children on a long and perilous journey

Afghan children on a long and perilous journey | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
Thousands of mostly teenage boys have fled their country to embark on a 10,000-mile trek to Europe in search of a better life. Anderson Cooper reports. (RT @nordbergj: Largest child migration of our time: Afghan boys smuggled through Europe.
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New map pinpoints cities to avoid as sea levels rise

New map pinpoints cities to avoid as sea levels rise | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
Sydney, Tokyo and Buenos Aires are in for some of the biggest sea-level rises by 2100, finds one of the most comprehensive predictions to date

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Tony Hall's curator insight, February 14, 2013 2:31 AM

Could be really good to look at when discussing sustainability.

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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:54 AM
I found this article really interesting for a few different reasons. As a history major, the article provided a lot of information that I thought was interesting and of which I was unaware. It’s important to understand the reasons for the breakup and/or formation of countries when studying history. Part of understanding that is recognizing and analyzing the geographic implications of these changes.
Perhaps most importantly, the disappearance of countries would certainly have severe economic repercussions. The complete absence of an economy that had been around for decades, or the emergence of several new economies all at once would have serious effects on the interaction between neighboring countries and the global economy. Cultural unity and tension also plays a large role in the disappearance of countries. Examining patterns of cultural dissimilarity and hostility explains the breakup of these countries and makes for nations that possess a great deal of cultural homogeneity and a palette of cultural diversity in a small geographic area.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

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peoplemovin - A visualization of migration flows

peoplemovin - A visualization of migration flows | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task

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Cassie Frazier's comment, May 4, 2013 8:45 PM
Today in China, love has become more about wealth than romance. Because of the gender imbalance created by the one child policy, there are many more men than women, as boys are the preferred sex. This has shifted the task of choosing a spouse to the women, and they want fancy things. Therefore, they tend to choose the rich to marry. The problem is that there are at least 40-50 million poor men in China, and the majority are alone. When men reach 30 and are still unmarried, they are called "leftovers". These men are much more likely to get into trouble. This is so sad because they are so lonely. By preferring males, China has created a huge group of men who may have to live forever alone.
Taylor Anderson's comment, May 6, 2013 1:43 PM
There is a huge gender imbalance making people choose between love and money
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 11:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

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Fresh Water Resources

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/where-we-get-our-fresh-water-christiana-z-peppard Fresh water accounts for only 2.5% of Earth's...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 12, 2013 2:45 PM

How much of the Earth's water is fresh water?  How much of that is used for industrial, agricultural or domestic uses?  Why is groundwater becoming increasingly utilized?  Enjoy this TED-ED video for the answers. 


Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend.

Agron S. Dida's comment, December 17, 2013 5:33 AM
Ben, there is a good link about the lack of water: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131216154330.htm#.UrAC_n3F2FA.twitter
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Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks

Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it
Income maps of every neighborhood in the U.S. See wealth and poverty in places like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Miami, and more.

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Alejandro Restrepo's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:22 PM

Very interesting aspect of our demographics here in Central Falls. Any one with an interest in demographics and the make up our city should take a look a this and compare it to other neighborhoods in Rhode Island. Knowledge is power. Empower yourself!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 2:16 PM

Can you find your neighborhood HUGGERS?

Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:25 AM

Compare the neighborhoods in and around your area.  What trends do you see?  Any surprises?