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Geography in IB @BIS
Geography and change
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As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts

As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it

"The nation's fertility rate has slipped below replacement levels partly because of the recession and a decline in immigration. That's raising concern about the nation's future."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's comment, April 23, 2013 3:11 PM
These stats are hard to take in, because it seems like even though birth rates are considered to be dropping, the country’s total population continues to rise, and fast. Immigration probably plays a major role in the adding of new citizens, though just because birth rates are decreasing it shouldn’t necessarily mean a bad thing. With a slow increase of people, there could possibly be drops in the unemployment rate, or even poverty level at a big stretch. With fewer people in the country, it could mean less competition among others, leaving more options for people to pursue. It says at the end of the article that, “there are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” This may hold true to an extent, but look at China for example. Their population is the largest in the world, containing roughly 20 of the 30 most polluted cities and being the top consumer of energy. Though the country has an unemployment level which is half of ours, they must put in place family planning methods such as the “one-child policy” to hope for better population control. If I know the United States, I highly doubt they would ever resort to such measures, unless the government wants uproars. So maybe I’m optimistic about the birth rate drops, but it shouldn’t be too much of a problem. Maybe we should rid of the self-checkouts and automated answering machines and slowdown in technology so we don’t find ourselves in a situation that’d become too hard to handle.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 2:48 PM
This decline in birth rates is largely due to the recession; people don’t want to have children because they can’t afford the care. We need to have a balance in our population. Having one age group, like elderly people, dominating over other generations can be a problem. Even though the birth rates are decreasing, our population is still growing at a steady rate. Immigrants trying to make a home for themselves and their families in the United States contribute in a big way to our population increase.
I think that when and if the economy bounces back, families will start to feel comfortable with their finances and the birth rate will spike. Yet, if the birth rate does get back to normalcy and the immigrants continue to come to this country maybe our population will see too much of an increase and overpopulation could be a problem. But I doubt our country will ever adopt the “one-child policy” currently in use in China, we will find some other way to control our population, whatever that may be.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:45 PM
The recession is a huge factor as to why the birth/fertility rate is dropping. It costs a lot of money to have a child and most people can’t afford to care for themselves never mind another baby. Even though the birth rate has been decreasing over the years, the population is still increasing due to immigration. With the birth rate decreasing the level of poverty could potentially decrease as well because there will not be an economic burden. I don’t think there should be too much of a concern about the birthrate dropping because once the economy returns to normal I’m sure people will want to expand their family. I do agree to a certain extent with the statement in the article: “Population growth leads to human innovation, and innovation leads to conservation ... There are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” Overpopulation, like in China, causes many issues, not just economically.
Rescooped by Amy Foster from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts

As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts | Geography in IB @BIS | Scoop.it

"The nation's fertility rate has slipped below replacement levels partly because of the recession and a decline in immigration. That's raising concern about the nation's future."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's comment, April 23, 2013 3:11 PM
These stats are hard to take in, because it seems like even though birth rates are considered to be dropping, the country’s total population continues to rise, and fast. Immigration probably plays a major role in the adding of new citizens, though just because birth rates are decreasing it shouldn’t necessarily mean a bad thing. With a slow increase of people, there could possibly be drops in the unemployment rate, or even poverty level at a big stretch. With fewer people in the country, it could mean less competition among others, leaving more options for people to pursue. It says at the end of the article that, “there are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” This may hold true to an extent, but look at China for example. Their population is the largest in the world, containing roughly 20 of the 30 most polluted cities and being the top consumer of energy. Though the country has an unemployment level which is half of ours, they must put in place family planning methods such as the “one-child policy” to hope for better population control. If I know the United States, I highly doubt they would ever resort to such measures, unless the government wants uproars. So maybe I’m optimistic about the birth rate drops, but it shouldn’t be too much of a problem. Maybe we should rid of the self-checkouts and automated answering machines and slowdown in technology so we don’t find ourselves in a situation that’d become too hard to handle.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 2:48 PM
This decline in birth rates is largely due to the recession; people don’t want to have children because they can’t afford the care. We need to have a balance in our population. Having one age group, like elderly people, dominating over other generations can be a problem. Even though the birth rates are decreasing, our population is still growing at a steady rate. Immigrants trying to make a home for themselves and their families in the United States contribute in a big way to our population increase.
I think that when and if the economy bounces back, families will start to feel comfortable with their finances and the birth rate will spike. Yet, if the birth rate does get back to normalcy and the immigrants continue to come to this country maybe our population will see too much of an increase and overpopulation could be a problem. But I doubt our country will ever adopt the “one-child policy” currently in use in China, we will find some other way to control our population, whatever that may be.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:45 PM
The recession is a huge factor as to why the birth/fertility rate is dropping. It costs a lot of money to have a child and most people can’t afford to care for themselves never mind another baby. Even though the birth rate has been decreasing over the years, the population is still increasing due to immigration. With the birth rate decreasing the level of poverty could potentially decrease as well because there will not be an economic burden. I don’t think there should be too much of a concern about the birthrate dropping because once the economy returns to normal I’m sure people will want to expand their family. I do agree to a certain extent with the statement in the article: “Population growth leads to human innovation, and innovation leads to conservation ... There are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” Overpopulation, like in China, causes many issues, not just economically.