Geography and Soc...
Follow
Find
132 views | +0 today
 
Scooped by D.a. Erdmann
onto Geography and Social Studies
Scoop.it!

Trails of Evidence: How Forensic Science Works

Trails of Evidence: How Forensic Science Works | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
The desire to identify lawbreakers and bring them to justice is so great that it has inspired countless stories, novels, plays, movies, and television series. But how accurate are the fictional portrayals of crime investigations?
more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by D.a. Erdmann
Scoop.it!

Christmas Video — History.com

Christmas Video — History.com | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
Discover the history of Christmas, a Christian holiday that celebrates Jesus' birth on December 25. Find out about its origins, popular traditions and more.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by D.a. Erdmann
Scoop.it!

Origins of Christmas — History.com Video

Origins of Christmas — History.com Video | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
The celebration of Christmas as we know it today stems from the traditions of several different cultures.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Google Search reveals religious biases/ stereotypes

Google Search reveals religious biases/ stereotypes | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it

Not saying that Google Search itself is biased, but that it can reveal the bias of internet users and all of the "information" posted online.  Within the proper context, seeing potential searches can be very informative about cultural perceptions, online communities and prejudices.   Be cautious and judicious in how (or if) you use this within a classroom setting.   See comments for additional results of additional "religious" searches. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, November 13, 2011 2:48 PM
For the search "why are mormons so..." the results were 1) nice 2) happy and 3)rich.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 13, 2011 3:40 PM
For the search "Why are atheists so..." the results were 1) angry 2) hated and 3) mean.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 13, 2011 3:43 PM
For the search "Why are Hindus so..." the results were 1) afraid of Muslims 2) angry with Avatar 3) cheap and 4) smart.
Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactive Sistine Chapel

Interactive Sistine Chapel | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it

One of the amazing memories of my trip to Europe was visiting the Vatican and developing a kink in my neck from marveling at the ceiling in the Sistine Chapel.  No photography is allowed to preserve reverence in what many consider not only a cultural heritage site, but a holy site.  This link is the next best thing to being in the Vatican staring at the Sistine Chapel.  We might not be able to travel the world with our students, but this can help us bring the world to our classroom.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:50 AM

This is a very cool opportunity due to the fact that photography isn't usually allowed in the Sistine chapel. Of course it can't compare to the beauty of the place in person, but in some ways it's almost more powerful as this room is usually filled to the brim with tourists, seeing it empty is a bit more striking as you can appreciate the fool instead of missing it in the crowds of people.

Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia

Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it

This is one of the more impressive cultural landmarks in the world, and an architectural marvel.  Studying the cultural landscape reveals that multiple 'layers' are superimposed one upon another.  This phenomenon, known as sequent occupance, is most plainly manifested in this site.  The Haga Sophia has been both a Christian and Muslim holy site, depending which political empire has controlled the city of Istanbul.       


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:26 PM

Turkey is a very unique country.  The land is spread among Europe, as well as Asia and the Middle East.  Its people are among many religions such as Christian and Muslim, and they speak various languages which show how diverse the region is.  Turkey acts almost like a bridge between the two continents and within its borders lie attributes that are hard to find anywhere else on earth.  What is strange about this specific site being the Haga Sophia is that it has been both a Christian and Muslim landmark.  In many other areas of the world, each religion holds authority to their respective traditions and structures.  Though the holy site in Istanbul shows how truely diverse the nation is and has been for its people and especially religions.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 26, 2014 9:49 PM

This is an amazing view of this remarkable land mark. The link provided above did not work however I was able to see the 3-d tour @ http://www.360tr.com/34_istanbul/ayasofya/english/. It was amazing to be able to zoom in and view all angles of this sacred space.The detail and intricacy was breathtaking.I also enjoyed that you were  able to view the surrounding location to establish context .

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:57 PM

Visiting the Haga Sophia is on my bucket list for sure! I find it fascinating how one beautiful site can radiate so many different historical periods as well as cultural differences. The Haga Sophia has traces of the religions and people that held control over it at one time or another. 

Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 1:17 PM

This is an iconic image that we have all seen.In 1984 a picture of a young Afghan refugee was taken and in June 1985 it was placed on the cover of National Geographic Magazine. 17 years later in 2002 the young woman was tracked down.During this visit a recent image was captured (the first and last time she was photographer was that day in 1984). Her name is Sharbat Gula and she never knew the impact her photo had made. So cutoff from the modern world void of most of her identity she did not even know how old she was.When the photo was taken she was in a refugee camp ,along with the remnants of her family that had survived the Afghan war.In 2002 when a search was assembled to find the woman with the piercing green eyes , the National Geographic organization did not know if she was still alive.After passing around her photo they were able to locate Sharbat .Reluctant to be caught talking to foreigners and uneasy about taking another photo National Geographic explained to the woman how she had inspired people to help her country. Having considered that she was  helping her people Sharbat agreed. National Geographic also helped to provide her family with much needed healthcare.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:58 PM

You can see in this woman's face that the years have been hard for her living as refugee. Although this seems like National Geographic giving themselves a pat on the back it is important to remember that this women became a national symbol for refugees and yet her life did not improve and furthermore she had no idea that her picture was so well known.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 6:36 PM

I never would have imagined the "Afghan girl" being alive. It's amazing how National Geographic was able to catch up and speak with her and photograph her. This demonstrates the pure professionalism and global outreach national geographic has. 

One of the things I am most thankful about is that I do not live in a war torn society. Being separated from my family, forced to flee and become a refugee is a horrid way of life that I know I would struggle to endure. Some Afghanistan people have been doing this for over twenty years. 

One time I was having a discussion with my friend. We talking about America and the westernized part of the world. He and I agreed how lucky we were to be born in America. We were born white males in the United States of America. We could have been born a woman living in Iran or Iraq, or even as a little rural Afghan boy whom would eventually be taken and abused by theTaliban. We kept going on with different scenarios and different countries. 

Want I want for people to realize is how advanced the United States of America is. Yes, we have our problems... but non comparable to other nations. Look at nations such as Afghanistan, Iraq, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda. These are first world nations which have war torn regions occupied by terrorists of all sorts. They also have little to no functioning government, although Afghanistan is improving. Even second world nations, although developing at a steady pace are plagued with an exponential amount of violent crimes and corruption. South Africa would be a prime example. 

Its amazing to read about the "Afghan girl"(s) or better yet Sharbat Gula. After all she has gone through she still has hope for her younger children. After enduring such a life of foul experiences she is still able to place all her faith into Allah and hope for the best for her children. It is also neat to see her place such a high level of importance on education. Education is the foundation for all development. 

Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it

This map shows each verified incident of violence in Gaza and Israel since last week's assassination of Hamas leader Ahmed al-Jabari.  Geospatial technologies combined with social media are changing how we learn about (and wage) wars. 

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Israeli/Palestinian Conflict

With a simple class hashtag (e.g.-#geog400ric) you can create a backchannel for student to collaborate outside the classroom walls. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by D.a. Erdmann
Scoop.it!

Trails of Evidence: How Forensic Science Works

Trails of Evidence: How Forensic Science Works | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
The desire to identify lawbreakers and bring them to justice is so great that it has inspired countless stories, novels, plays, movies, and television series. But how accurate are the fictional portrayals of crime investigations?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by D.a. Erdmann
Scoop.it!

Christmas Video — History.com

Christmas Video — History.com | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
Discover the history of Christmas, a Christian holiday that celebrates Jesus' birth on December 25. Find out about its origins, popular traditions and more.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by D.a. Erdmann
Scoop.it!

>FromParis : Paris panoramas, virtual visits, panoramic views, photographs, 360° views, Quicktime VR, free ecards from Paris

>FromParis : Paris panoramas, virtual visits, panoramic views, photographs, 360° views, Quicktime VR, free ecards from Paris | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
Panoramas, photographs, virtual tours, Quicktime VR, 360°, wallpapers, free screensavers and ecards from Paris the city of light by Eric Rougier...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by D.a. Erdmann
Scoop.it!

Hagia Sophia - 3D Virtual Tour

Hagia Sophia - 3D Virtual Tour | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
Hagia Sophia - 360° panoramic virtual tour - experience Hagia Sophia as if you're there!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Golden Temple of Amritsar

The Golden Temple of Amritsar | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
The Golden Temple is the holiest shrine of the Sikh religion. It is also home to one of the largest free eateries in the world.

 

This two-minute video clip is an effective portal to alternative religious traditions on the South Asian subcontinent.   While students might not at first relate to the theologies of diverse religious traditions, they connect with the underlying ethics of many world religions.  This video is an effective tool to help them gain greater cultural understanding and demystify unfamiliar cultural practices. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 7, 2012 3:25 PM
I like that the Sikh religion allows people of all religions to visit their holy temple. These people seem like good people.
Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 1:18 AM

I was impressed by the fact that the people of the Sikh religion are very accepting of people who remain outside their system of beliefs.  They acknowledge the fact that there are other religions and don't see any reason to treat them with anything but respect.  These people are most definitely good people.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:46 AM

This temple is amazing because it is not only a place of worship but also a huge free eatery. This temple plays a role in the poor relief of the area because all poor people are welcome to come and eat. The fact they welcome those of different faiths as well into this temple of worship is something that is really remarkable because of the fear and distrust many faiths seem to have of one another. If only more places of worship acts as this one.

Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Religious Geography of the United States

Religious Geography of the United States | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it

A set of 2000 census maps that focus on religion in the United States.  Even in secular societies, religion can play an important role within society, both culturally and politically.  Include are links to many more religious maps.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rebecca!Morgan Geography's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:30 PM
Geography- these maps show the diverse religions and the distribution of them.
Andrew and Tom's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:11 PM

This map shows the consentration of religion in the US and how ut mainly is in the south.

Scooped by D.a. Erdmann
Scoop.it!

Inside Mecca

For over 1400 years, Mecca has been one of the most important cities in the Arabian Peninsula. By the middle of the 6th century, there were three major settl...

 

As the heart of Islam, Mecca brings in pilgrims from around the world.  This documentary gives a great overview of the historical, spiritual and cultural reasons why this is sacred space to over one billion Muslims.  Additionally, this documentary contains an analysis of the logistics that are a part of the Hajj.  

 

Tags: Islam, tourism, place, transportation, religion, Middle East, culture. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Barrier to Peace

A Barrier to Peace | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it

"Why would they want to pull down these walls?” asks William Boyd mildly as he offers me a cup of tea in his home at Cluan Place, a predominantly Loyalist area of east Belfast.

 

These walls, orginally installed in the late 60s to protect Belfast residents during "the Troubles."  Today, some argue that these walls are now barriers to the peace process as they continue defacto segregation.  Walls, as barriers to diffusion, stifle communication, cooperation and interaction.  Still, these walls are symbols of communal identity and icons in the cultural landscape.  For more academic work on this, see Peter Shirlow's Belfast: Segregation, Violence and the City.

 

Questions to Consider: How would a wall through an already culturally and politically divided city impact both sides of the wall?  Today, are the walls beneficial to peace in Northern Ireland?       

 

Tags: Ireland, states, borders, political. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 7:38 PM

The walls in Belfast Ireland were put in the 60's to protect the residents and today many people argue they need to come down. My grandmother just returned from a trip to Ireland and Belfast was one of the areas they went. She said it was very sad, Christians had to walk on one side of the street and Protestans on the other in one area and the tour bus driver was being voice monitered by the police the whole time. There is so much seperation in Befast because of that wall and more people dont want it taken down then want it down for anything to be done. 

Marissa Roy's curator insight, October 30, 2013 12:14 PM

The barrier in Belfast, Ireland is an impressive one. It has been there since the 1960s and having it there has become a security for the residence on both sides. Neither side wants it taken down, however, they have extremely different political/religious views. It seems strange to me that these people would prefer living in prison-like conditions just because that is the way it has been for so long. So long as the physical walls stay up, so will the cultural walls between these people.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:13 AM

This article is about large walls which were constructed fifty years ago to separate a part Belfast, Northern Ireland to protect citizens from conflicts between loyalists and separatists. Q wall separating people could temporarily protect people from violent conflict, but it would undoubtedly ensure continued conflict and intensify the feeling of "Us vs. Them." Though the people interviewed from both sides of the wall in the article like the wall since it gives them a feeling of security, the wall is likely damaging to a peace process in Northern Ireland.

Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Israel - Gaza conflict

Israel - Gaza conflict | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
Israeli airstrikes began November 14, following months of Palestinian rocket fire into Israel.

 

"Monday, the top leader of Hamas dared Israel to launch a ground invasion of Gaza and dismissed diplomatic efforts to broker a cease-fire in the six-day-old conflict, as the Israeli military conducted a new wave of deadly airstrikes which included a second hit on a 15-story building that houses media outlets."  This photo essay shows 34 powerful images that are emerging from this deadly conflict.  If students need some background to understand who are the major players in this conflict, this glossary should be helpful. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Wen Shi's curator insight, July 13, 2014 4:17 AM

I was so shocked while reading this ariticle and seeing those pictures. The conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis is something that is deeply rooted in the history of the two nations. And the war, resulted by this conflict, has taken away many people's lives. The 2 countries's people are suffering. Many kids are just at our ages, they could not get education or anything else that we take for granted here, even had to bear the pain of losing relatives and homes. I could never imagine how sad and disastrous wars can be. :(

Hossan Epiques Novelle's curator insight, July 13, 2014 4:58 AM

The two countries should take the chance to resolve the conflict amicably before the situation tips over and war is inevitable. The loss of lives resulting from the war would be pointless.

Zhiyang Liang's curator insight, July 13, 2014 12:02 PM

In my perspective, why does people will have a thought of eliminating prejudice is that prejudice can lead to unfair treatment or the violation of rights of individuals or groups of people just like the conflict between Israel and Gaza.

Rescooped by D.a. Erdmann from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Israel and Palestine

Hey friends-it's time to stop saying, "It's too complicated!" Watch this Jewish Voice for Peace 6 minute mini-primer. about why Israelis and Palestinians are fighting..

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth. In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
James Hobson's curator insight, October 28, 2014 9:58 AM

(Africa topic 1)

{{Note: Some topics and locations pertain to multiple geographic regions (i.e. northern Africa, the Middle East, and southwestern Asia, and topics in different regions may refer to the same country or location because of this.}}

I found it interesting to watch a video that comes from an implied anti-Israel standpoint, especially since the organization which made this video is called the Jewish Voice for Peace. Though there has always been disagreement as to who should occupy some of the most hallowed land in the world, it seems that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict stems more out of the UN repartitioning plan. Regardless of clashing religions and cultures, it does seem unfair that a minority of people control the majority of land and resources. This makes me wonder why exactly the UN made the Israeli state there: was is purely because of the Jewish religion associations?, or because no other country wanted to absorb the increasing number of refugees?, or because the UN wanted to gain a stronghold in the Middle East?, or perhaps a combination of all of the above?

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 8:40 PM

From 1946 to 2000, Palestine (Islamic individuals) have been at war with Israel (Jewish individuals) over land in Israel/Palestine. In 1946, Palestine took over most of Israel but throughout the decades up until 2000, Israel slowly won over almost every piece of Israel and now, Palestine barely has any land in Israel. From 1949 to 1967, Palestine took over a specific area of Israel known as the West Bank and another small part of Israel known as Gaza. There was a lot of war going on between Israel and Palestine because Israel discriminated against non-Jews. Palestinians became refugees but that didn't stop Israel from fighting to take over Palestinian land.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 30, 1:03 AM

The video was informative, but bias. I have a stronger understanding of how Israel is exploiting, how the borders were re-drawn, and how the make up of the original border mattered. However, the author gave me these facts in a very pro-Palestinian manner. The narrator sees the Palatines as refugees instead of the Jews, who as the narrator said, were "refugees living where people already lived." This similar identity clearly resonated with the narrator who almost 2 minutes of the video speaking about how the treatment of the new refugees was wrong. While a fair amount of the rest of the video advocated a solution to help Palestinian, hence the negative portrayals of the United States backed peace talks.  

 

What was missing from this video was Israeli's story. The Jewish community had become a large force within Palestinian, but was not being aptly recognized. In fact, the Palestinian's prior to the UN offer weren't treating the Jews fair. When this offer came along, it was the Palestinian's who started the fight, a point that was down played in this video as the narrator rushed to point the finger at Israeli's wrong doings. Yet, another portrayal of this conflict mentioned in class, showed the Israeli's feel threatened because they are a minority surrounded by enemies within the region. All of this information means that the Palestinian's and other neighbors play more of a negative hand in the land dispute than what the narrator says.    

 

To be honest, I don't know enough about either side to really say who I support. However, from what I gather, neither side is a bushel of roses. As learned in class their were a fair deal of geographic tensions from BOTH parties that caused the fighting and their is still a fair deal of geographic tensions from BOTH parties that factor into the fighting today. Thus, the bias of this video acts as a reminder that a person looking to understand a heated conflict, such as this one between neighbors, must view the information with causation. 

Scooped by D.a. Erdmann
Scoop.it!

The Economics of the Gaza Cease-Fire - Al-Monitor

The Economics of the Gaza Cease-Fire - Al-Monitor | Geography and Social Studies | Scoop.it
Al-MonitorThe Economics of the Gaza Cease-FireAl-MonitorThe argument surrounding whether it was right to stop the operation in Gaza is taking place in terms that are ideological, military, political and more — but deals less with the economic...
more...
No comment yet.