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Geography In the News
A page dedicated to summarising & aggregating topical geographical content which features in the news
Curated by James S Bown
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US faces climate talks dilemma

US faces climate talks dilemma | Geography In the News | Scoop.it
The US faces a dilemma at climate change talks in Qatar, as the final text approves the principle of compensating poorer nations.
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We were wrong on peak oil. There's enough to fry us all

We were wrong on peak oil. There's enough to fry us all | Geography In the News | Scoop.it
George Monbiot: A boom in oil production has made a mockery of our predictions.
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US storm woe endures for millions

US storm woe endures for millions | Geography In the News | Scoop.it
At least two million people remain without power in the eastern US, amid sweltering temperatures, after storms blamed for 22 deaths since Friday.
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Study: The U.S. could be powered by 80% green...

Study: The U.S. could be powered by 80% green... | Geography In the News | Scoop.it
Study: The U.S. could be powered by 80% green energy in 2050 According to a study published by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), up to 80% of the power needed by the whole country could...
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US faces worst drought since 1956

US faces worst drought since 1956 | Geography In the News | Scoop.it
The US is enduring the widest drought since 1956, according to new data released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
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Immigrants Working In America

Immigrants Working In America | Geography In the News | Scoop.it
The U.S. is still a nation of immigrants: One in six U.S. workers was born somewhere else. Here's where America's immigrants come from, and what they do for work.

 

Of the American immigrant population, where were the workers born?  In what industries are they employed?  These are two straight-forward graphics with the answers to those questions.    


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Kate C's comment, July 8, 2012 4:29 PM
I found the second graphic, "Field of Employment by Place of Birth", interesting because of the relevantly even distribution of employment across the board. The Latin American born population seems the be the only one that deviates from the trend, with high percentages in Agricultural and Construction fields, and the lowest numbers in Education, Health Care, & Social Services. Interesting how students are included and I wonder how accurate the Census Bureau is at measuring specific employment information for undocumented immigrants.
Macy Nossaman's curator insight, September 20, 2013 11:26 AM

This is a good article about immigrants in America because it talks about all of the different places people have immigrated from and now live and work in the U.S. Since my topic is European Immigration, It shows that there are 2.4 million Europeans currently working in the U.S.

Laurel Stelter's comment, September 27, 2013 11:23 AM
I think that this is a really interesting article. The two pictures really help define America and its workplace well. It surprised me how many people weren't born in the U.S., but still work here.
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Racial Diversity Increases, But Segregation Persists

U.S. census data shows racial diversity is increasing in major cities across the United States. But highly diverse neighborhoods are still rare, newly arrive...

 

I've read within the last few months articles mentioning that segregation in inner city neighborhood are on the rise, and other headlines stating that ethnic diversity within urban areas is at an all-time high.  My first reaction was, "so which is it?"  This research shows how to make sense of both of these trends which seem contradictory.  For more context on this issue, see: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/neighborhoods/2012/06/watch-these-us-cities-segregate-even-they-diversify/2346/

 

For a segregation at all time low article, see: http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/1145693870/segregation-hits-historic-low

For the link to 'segregation is still rampant,' see: http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/1103106026/reports-of-the-end-of-segregation-greatly-exaggerated


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