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Geography 400
Justin Roscoe
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Africa Takes Off

Africa Takes Off | Geography 400 | Scoop.it

Ask this question: Which region of the world currently is the home to 6 of the 10 fastest growing economies?  Most people (myself included) would be surprised to hear that the region is sub-Saharan Africa.  While Sub-Saharan Africa is still the least economically developed region with some very significant challenges, too often Africa is only taught as a region of problems and negative patterns.  

 

Justin Roscoe- Its Intriguing to me that a continent with such an abundance of resources has been so devastated by colonialism and civil wars for so long and is just now taking vast economic strides. While I'm pleased to see it, it should have been something that happened a long time ago for a continent so rich with resources with so much potential.


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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Geography 400 | Scoop.it

With this depiction of each countries footpront in the world you can see the various difference in culture and how much affect our daily lives leave on the world especially in comparison to Bangladesh who judging by this depiction live a much more conservative lifestyle and dont need to comsume as much of the worlds resources as the others. It was also interesting to see that Costa Rica ranks hire than China, most likely due to the recent industrialization and the affects globalization has had on it.             


After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Haiti: Legacy of Disaster

Haiti: Legacy of Disaster | Geography 400 | Scoop.it

"Even before the earthquake Haiti's environment teetered on the brink of disaster. Brent and Craig Renaud report on the country's deforestation problems."

 

Justin Roscoe- Seeing this video and understanding the effect the people have on the environment and that the environment has on the people/economy is an amazing sight. It is a fitting depiction of exactly what a vicious cycle is. Due to a less than poor economy the people are forced to live off of the land, unfortunately doing this affects the nation, geographically, in a negative way. Since the country is 97% deforested it makes it that much more likely for natural disasters to occur. When it rains in Haiti there is nothing to slow the rain down or to soak it up. Mudslides occur often and the flooding has devastating effects on agriculture and on roadways. Haiti is currently in an economic state that is very difficult to get out of. The land has little use left to it and one of Haiti’s only assets is tourism although the resort areas of Haiti are fenced in and are a far cry from what is really happening in Haiti. While it is inevitable that natural disasters will occur in certain places, the damage to these areas depends greatly on the affect the people have on the land with which they are occupying. The recent earthquake in Haiti was devastating mostly due to how the people were living. The number of people injured would have been much less if all the people where in proper housing and in areas deemed safe for building. Haitians are living in huts, traveling by dirt roads, living off of the little profits they receive from charcoal sales and the government does little to help increase the standard of living due to what many believe is corruption. 

 

 


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Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2:54 PM
This is an example of how civilizations can be hovering on the brink of destruction. The earthquake was the final straw it caused collapse of the whole system. The environment became a wasteland because humans that so not have their basic needs met cannot think about long term consequences of their actions. Need is immediate. If we want to help the country it needs to be in very small doses over many years. Their situation wasn't created overnight and the solution won't happen overnight either.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 5:56 PM

This is an example of how civilizations can be hovering on the brink of destruction. The earthquake was the final straw it caused collapse of the whole system. The environment became a wasteland because humans that so not have their basic needs met cannot think about long term consequences of their actions. Need is immediate. If we want to help the country it needs to be in very small doses over many years. Their situation wasn't created overnight and the solution won't happen overnight either.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 1:49 PM

Natural disasters occur because of two things; the environmental reason and how people react to it. This earthquake was only half the reason Haiti is in a natural disaster state. The people who don't know how to respond to such "natural disasters" are the real reason of problematic changes.