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More than a club: FC Barcelona and Catalonia's road to independence

As Catalonia goes to the polls, Sid Lowe looks at one of the region's great cultural sporting icons and its role in Catalan identity...

 

Sports and cultural identity of a region are often intertwined. As Catalonia is poised to break from Spain, this video shows how the local teams (especially FC Barcelona) are at the center of political identity and part of the very fabric of the political movement that is pushing for independence.  For more, see this recent GITN.

 

Tags: sport, Spain, Europe, devolution, autonomy.


Via Seth Dixon
Jessica Martel's insight:

its understood that catalonie has a completely different country from the rest of spain. In fact many people associate catalonia as a seperate country. It would be cool to see spain let them have thier independence. However that would mean spain would lose land and money. For the most part, atleast the catalonia poeple are expressing thier feelings and wishes in a humane manor, rather than with vilolence

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:54 AM

Sports and cultural identity of a region are often intertwined. As Catalonia is poised to break from Spain, this video shows how the local teams (especially FC Barcelona) are at the center of political identity and part of the very fabric of the political movement that is pushing for independence.  For more, see this recent Geography in the News article.


Tags: sport, Spain, Europe, devolution, autonomy.

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The Great Barrier Reef: Just unwell or terminally ill?

The Great Barrier Reef: Just unwell or terminally ill? | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
Starfish, cyclones, chemicals. If things continue the way they are, the Great Barrier Reef won't be great for much longer.
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Scottish independence and Cypriot unification

Scottish independence and Cypriot unification | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it

Yet, there is another issue with the potential to affect deeply the long-term evolution of the European Union. Although this issue has been fermenting for some time, only recently has it registered as a potential point of conflict on the European agenda. It is the possibility of Scottish independence. How this issue is handled in Brussels may also affect the terms on which Cyprus is reunified and the Turkish Cypriots are formally integrated into the rest of the EU.


Via Peter A Bell
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#Econimist | Small island, big finger #Cyprus

#Econimist | Small island, big finger #Cyprus | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it

CALL it the cussedness of an island nation. Beneath the cheeriness of Aphrodite’s sun-kissed island lies the intransigence of the Balkans and the Middle East. On the eve of its accession to the European Union in 2004, the Greek-Cypriot republic rejected a UN plan to reunite with the Turkish-Cypriot north, where the plan was supported. Within the club the Greek-Cypriot government has used and abused EU institutions to wage its feud with Turkey and to lend support to Russia.

This week’s 36-0 vote in the Cypriot parliament to reject a euro-zone bail-out, in protest at a large proposed tax on bank deposits, may be the most momentous act of bloody-mindedness yet, raising new questions about the stability, and even the survival, of the euro. Outside parliament, a demonstrator’s poster summed up the mood: “Fuck Europe”. Such defiance from the island will be admired by some, yet it does not alter Cyprus’s predicament. It is bust, and cannot afford to salvage its oversized and insolvent banks (see article). Cyprus is also trying to play the euro zone against Russia, amid rumours that it might be prepared to offer Russia concessions in offshore gasfields or a naval base.


Via Tatjana Dimitrijevic
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ahahha

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Should Cyprus drop the euro? Here’s what they have to gain–and lose

Should Cyprus drop the euro? Here’s what they have to gain–and lose | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
The island nation has plenty to gain from dropping the common currency. But it also has a great deal to lose.
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Press Release Occupy Buffer Zone (Greek & Turkish follow)

Press Release Occupy Buffer Zone (Greek & Turkish follow) | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
Press Release Occupy Buffer Zone (OBZ) On the night of Friday 6/4/2012 as is known, the police invaded the space that was under occupation by the Occupy Buffer Zone movement in the Dead Zone. The m...
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this article helps to better understand the issues as to why the biffer zone has become occupied. it outlines the reasons why cypriots feel they dont have rights and they are being invaded by police forces

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What's behind the bailout crisis in Cyprus?

What's behind the bailout crisis in Cyprus? | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
While appearing to be yet another victim of Europe's debt crisis, Cyprus is suffering in part due to unique characteristics including an oversized reliance on foreign depositors and a tiny economy.
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This causes Cyprus to be in major debt.

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China's 'Mountain-Moving' Project

A promotional video shows planned development of a state-level development zone by government of Lanzhou, a provincial capital in China's arid northwest...

 

The Lanzhou province is lightly populated mainly due to it's semi-arid climate and rugged topography.  The goal is make a 500 square mile area (currently with 100,000 people) into a city with over 1 million people by 2030.  To make this new metropolis, developers are planning to literally remove mountains to create a more 'ideal' urban environment.  This makes some of the most ambitious environmental modification projects seem tame.  For more read, the accompanying article from the Guardian.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What potential environmental impacts come from this scale of modification?  How will this massive influx of the population impact the region?  Could this type of project happen in other part of the world? 

 

Tags: environment, urban ecology, planning, environment modify, China.


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 11, 2012 8:51 PM
The developer is claiming this will be "protective development." I am not sure if I buy that. They are moving mountains- which means everything that comes with that, wildlife, trees, etc... And they are building an airport and an oil refinery (amongst other things).. Urbanizing can be great for the economy- but at what cost.
Elizabeth Allen's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:51 PM

The developer is claiming this will be "protective development." I am not sure if I buy that.  They are moving mountains- which means everything that comes with that, wildlife, trees, etc...  And they are building an airport and an oil refinery (amongst other things)..  Urbanizing can be great for the economy- but at what cost.   Elizabeth Allen

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

Via Seth Dixon
Jessica Martel's insight:

crazyyyy.... and I thought the dorms at ric were little, people are confined to these small spaces because there is so many people living there there isnt enough room to have bigger more comfortable living spaces.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

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Lecture: British Pakistanis divided on ethnic and sectarian lines, says scholar – The Express Tribune

Lecture: British Pakistanis divided on ethnic and sectarian lines, says scholar – The Express Tribune | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
Most of the 1,500 mosque­s in UK have become fiefdo­ms of illite­rate imams import­ed from Pakist­an.
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South Korea withdraws most of its citizens from factory complex in North Korea

South Korea withdraws most of its citizens from factory complex in North Korea | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
North Korea on Monday approved the withdrawal of most of the remaining South Korean personnel at a jointly run industrial park in the North, South Korean officials said, with a final seven set to stay behind to negotiate unpaid wages for North...
Jessica Martel's insight:

It's crazy that two countries this close together are so polar opposite. When is North Korea going to take southern inflkuence and beneifit themselves?

 

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Pirates on the rocks

Pirates on the rocks | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
EXCLUSIVE: WAR on pirates wreaking terror on the high seas is finally being WON — thanks to their old scourge
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Louis Culotta's comment, May 2, 2013 10:10 AM
it just goes to show you how bad it is over in East Africa and something is being done about it to protest shipping in that area.
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Dubai: 10 Things to Do — 4. Champagne Brunch - TIME

Dubai: 10 Things to Do — 4. Champagne Brunch - TIME | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
This is a Muslim state, but alcohol flows liberally. By law, it can be served only within the confines of a hotel, but with an estimated 450 hotels in the emirate, some with up to 26 bars, restaurants...
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The Aral Sea Crisis

The Aral Sea Crisis | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it

By establishing a program to promote agriculture and especially that of cotton, Soviet government led by Khrouchtchev in the 1950s deliberately deprived the Aral Sea of its two main sources of water income, which almost immediately led to less water arriving to the sea. Not only was all this water being diverted into canals at the expense of the Aral Sea supply, but the majority of it was being soaked up by the desert and blatantly wasted (between 25% and 75% of it, depending on the time period). The water level in the Aral Sea started drastically decreasing from the 1960s onward. In normal conditions, the Aral Sea gets approximately one fifth of its water supply through rainfall, while the rest is delivered to it by the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. Evaporation causes the water level to decrease by the same amount that flows into the Sea, making it sustainable as long as inflow is equal to evaporation on average. Therefore the diversion of rivers is at the origin of the imbalance that caused the sea to slowly desiccate over the last 4 decades.

Jessica Martel's insight:

Tradgedy due to unatural disaster.

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Regional Geography

Making the connections...

 

Thinking geographically is in essence about making the connections between themes, across regions and at a variety of scales.  


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EUROPE - Turkish Cyprus willing to resume negotiations

EUROPE - Turkish Cyprus willing to resume negotiations | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
Turkish Cypriots are willing to resume stalled reunification talks with Greek Cypriots...

Via Céline Arnoldi
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Everything You Need to Know About the Cyprus Bank Disaster

Everything You Need to Know About the Cyprus Bank Disaster | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
Taxing insured bank deposits is the worst way to pay for the bailout.
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OCCUPY THE BUFFER ZONE

OCCUPY THE BUFFER ZONE | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
from UN-controlled to UNCONTROLLED
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‘Occupy’: we’re living the Cyprus solution

‘Occupy’: we’re living the Cyprus solution | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
By Stefanos EvripidouPublished on April 14, 2012  'Occupy' members talk about why they are frowned upon by the establishment THE CYPRUS problem has been solved.  At least, for a small group of indi...
Jessica Martel's insight:

once they force themselves to meet eachother, they realize that they arent so different from one another. The occupation of the buffer zone may just be a great thing for Cyprus.

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Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway

Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it

"Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you may notice that the commuters around you include a dog - a stray dog, on its own, just using the handy underground Metro to beat the traffic and get from A to B.  Yes, some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's immense and complex subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops."


Via Seth Dixon
Jessica Martel's insight:

The fact that dogs have adapted to the subway... is absolutly crazy... shows how smart they are.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 18, 8:25 PM

This article shows how intelligent some dogs are. They are adapting to the environment around them and figuring out how to survive within the city. I give them credit, as I am sure they have their tactics to survive, whether its begging for food or traveling subways to look for food. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 5:46 PM

Dogs are creatures of habit. They get on at one stop and off at another every day or every so often. This is because there is an abundance of stray dogs and since no one is taking them in, Moscow will continue to have interesting subway surfers among them.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 8:06 AM

Humans commonly think of themselves as separate from nature.  However, we very much are a part of it and animals, like these stray dogs, know it.  When dealing with something more powerful than yourself, you have to learn how to navigate the system in order to survive.  That is exactly what these dogs have done, literally and figuratively, by learning the complex subway systems in Moscow.  It is an example of how animals can adapt to their man-made surroundings and how persistent (the rest of) nature can be.

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Hong Kong and China: Growing apart?

Hong Kong and China: Growing apart? | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
The BBC's John Simpson reports from Hong Kong, where the former colony's increasing independent-mindedness is worrying Beijing.

Via Seth Dixon
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Steven Sutantro's curator insight, December 20, 2012 6:06 PM

Interesting facts...that's the interdependence concept of Geography..

Bill Chen's comment, December 22, 2012 6:20 AM
http://www.myairmaxpascher.com/
Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 23, 2013 5:34 PM

Hong Kong has a mix of Chinese heritage and culture and British ideals. They lived under the British rule for so long that they grew accustomed to the British government system and freedoms. When the UK handed Hong Kong over to China, the people of Hong Kong were afraid that the Chinese government would step in and put them under the same system as the rest of China. China decided to allow Hong Kong to have its own system, but Hong Kong still fears China stepping in and forcing them to change and conform to the rules of the rest of China. Hong Kong is now seeing some protesting and some tension from its people about becoming truly Chinese. They do not want to be Chinese, and they do not want to be British either. They want to form their own country. However, it is highly unlikely that China will let Hong Kong go, but I do wonder if the ideals of Hong Kong, like elections, will slowly spread to the rest of China and create tensions that will cause a change in the Chinese government altogether.

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Seth Dixon
Jessica Martel's insight:

"women hold up half the skye" I like that haha. Anyways, the gender imbalance in china is rediculas. Hopefully be trying to forsce the women are equal thought this will in a generation or so fix itself. This way, there will also be less abortions per family.

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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 1:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 9:14 AM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 2:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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BBC NEWS | South Asia | Kashmir: The origins of the dispute

BBC NEWS | South Asia | Kashmir: The origins of the dispute | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
Victoria Schofield, author of Kashmir in Conflict, explains how the dispute between India and Pakistan over Kashmir began.
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Conflict in Sub Saharan Africa: Is Ethnicity to Blame? by Leisa Oden-Kurz :: SSRN

Conflict in Sub Saharan Africa: Is Ethnicity to Blame? by Leisa Oden-Kurz :: SSRN | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
Is the underlying cause for conflict in Sub Saharan Africa due to ethnicity? This is the prevailing argument among scholars like Goran Hyden and Donald Horowitz
Jessica Martel's insight:

ethnicity isnt the problem, it is the natural lack of resources that causes so much conflict.

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ethanrobert's curator insight, April 8, 7:21 AM

It's interesting to think that most of the conflict in Sub Saharan Africa is due to ethnicity because of all the differences between ethnicities can cause things like civil wars. It's sad though that such differences would cause things like war and mass murders just because the ethnic beliefs between the groups matter more to kill the other over it. -Robert

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Somali pirates cost global economy '$18 billion a year'

Somali pirates cost global economy '$18 billion a year' | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
Somali pirates are pushing global trade costs up by billions of dollars per year, says the World Bank, with more than 1,000 pirate attacks since 2005.
Jessica Martel's insight:

These arent johnny depp and his cast members. These pirates are very scarey, and dangerous. With out them, the trading industry would be alot different, it would be safer and it would also cost less, if only there was a way to end the piracy.

 

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Dubai's debt crisis: One year on

Dubai's debt crisis: One year on | Geography 400 portfolio | Scoop.it
For a city that had got used to the heady heights of economic success, Dubai came back down to earth with a bit of a bump last year.
Jessica Martel's insight:

Scare for Dubai, a shock to the world that this very wealthy country was near to in debt. Looks as though they need more skill when it comes to some financial investments.

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