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U.N. approves Palestinian 'observer state' bid

U.N. approves Palestinian 'observer state' bid | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
The United Nations General Assembly approved an upgraded U.N. status for the Palestinian Authority, despite U.S. and Israeli opposition.

 

While this may be primarily symbolic, it is still a highly significant move on the part of the United Nations.  65 years ago, the United Nations called for a two-state system.  This map of the vote that I found on Facebook (can't find another source as of yet) is quite intriguing. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why might a country choose to abstain?  Can you think of a specific reason why a particular country abstained?  With this new geopolitical fact, how will Israel and Palestine move forward?   


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

One year ago, the U.N. status regarding Palestine was upgraded from "non-member observer entity" to "non-member observer state".  While Palestinians believe that this is a major push for peace and for Palestinian independence, other countries believe that the change will not do anything for Palestine.

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Seth Dixon's comment, November 30, 2012 7:32 AM
I found this comment from Shaul Cohen, a Jewish Geography Professor who lived in Israel and served in the IDF: "Sixty-five years ago today the United Nations voted in favor of an independent Israel, a vote that was opposed by Palestinians and the rest of the Arab world. That opposition was a mistake, and they also were voting against the creation of a Palestinian state. Today the United Nations moved one step closer to the establishment of that Palestinian state, a move that was opposed by Israel and the United States. That opposition was a mistake.
In the intervening decades many lives have been lost, many families have been shattered, and the course of two nations has been warped by violence and hostility. Unfortunately, there are still too many people on each side that refuse to recognize the basic rights and fundamental humanity of the other community, and see the situation as a zero-sum contest. Indeed, there are those that celebrate when the other loses even more so than working toward realizing their own goals. This is a tragedy, and the guilt lies with the leadership on both sides, but also with those who justify their actions on fear and hatred… something that is too easily mobilized and manipulated by those opposed to compromise.
It’s way past time for Israelis to recognize that when Palestinians lose, they themselves lose, and for Palestinians to recognize that when Israelis lose, they too lose. The communities are too bound up with one another to suffer in isolation. In the long run Israel will not have what it wants before there is a Palestinian state, and Palestinians will not have their state so long as they contemplate war against Israel. The way forward, despite it all, remains two states for two nations, a configuration that has broad endorsement and a simple logic. ANYONE WHO ADVOCATES ON BEHALF OF PALESTINIANS MUST ALSO BE A SUPPORTER OF A SECURE ISRAEL; AND ANYONE WHO ADVOCATES ON BEHALF OF ISRAEL HAS TO SUPPORT AN INDEPENDENT AND VIABLE PALESTINIAN STATE. Anything else is a recipe for continued failure and bloodshed, and there’s been far too much of that already. Today is less a day for celebration than a day for reflection, and even more for dedication to a just and lasting peace. All the rest is just vanity…."
James Hobson's curator insight, October 28, 2014 10:17 AM

(Africa topic 3)

Though there is much to be said from this map, I would like to focus on the red and black countries. I was surprised that only 9 nations did not support the acknowledgement of Palestine as a recognizable political entity. Of those 9, only 2 are members of the G8 (or perhaps now G7 due to Russia's suspension) Summit committee. The countries which abstained likely did so out of a mix of reasons: to not offend some of their allies by voting no, to not offend other allies by voting yes, not having enough of an opinion to make a complete decision, or having a mixed opinion within their own borders. IN this way it's a "pleading the Fifth" motion, which I believe can be seen as a smart move, politically speaking. Just like the 2-party struggle within the US, sometimes there are no two clear right and wrong answers.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 29, 2014 4:47 PM

The resolution elevates their status from "non-member observer entity" to "non-member observer state," the same category as the Vatican, which Palestinians hope will provide new leverage in their dealings with Israel.-CNN.com

 

This was a small but powerful victory for Palestinians . The map pictured above shows how the world voted on this status change from :(non-member observer entity to non-member observer state). Most notably the U.S. and Israel voted against this change. Many countries abstained from voting "yes or no", this was the case for Australia.The United States chose to vote no in this situation on the basis that it would only create further unrest in this area. And for obvious reasons Israel voted no as well.Only time can tell if there is to be continued unrest in this area, although it is likely.

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Aborigines threaten to shut Uluru

Aborigines threaten to shut Uluru | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
Aboriginal leaders threaten to ban tourists from a top Australian landmark in protest at "racist" government policies.

Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This is an interesting BBC news source and even though it is from 2008, it is still important to the topic of initiating government policies, especially those that may have a racial component.  Aborigines threatened to shut  down access to the Australian landmark, Uluru (previously named Ayer's Rock by European explorers).  Australian government leaders imposed laws banning alcohol and pornography from Aborigines in hopes to lower the incidents of child abuse.  While child abuse is a more prevalent issue among indigenous groups rather than those who are not Aborigines, I do not think it is fair to impose particular bans against certain groups.  Child abuse is most likely an issue among Australians other than Aborigines, but just because it might be more prevalent among Aborigines, it is not a reason to punish one group of people and not all.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:15 PM

This article points out the political and cultural geography of Australia.  The legislation that the indigenous people sees as raciest and painting a picture of them as bad people may lead to their closing off on of Australia’s tourist attractions.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 9:22 PM

I have an issue with the fact this legislation isn’t directly targeting the issue of child sex abuse. Rather the legislation focuses on farther off underlying factor like alcohol (I say this because the article never made a clear link to the use of such substance and the abuse). In a way, I can see why the Aboriginal leader could say it is a racial issue seeing as how their whole peoples style of living is being targeted. Now I am not sure if I would feel differently if the legislation was actually working, but as the article mentioned the legislation isn’t actually having a great enough impact. To me it feels the legislation was really about trying to improve their countries standard of living in regards to life expectancy, etc. Maybe that is because of the way the article read, but really given how indirectly the legislation acts I think there was an ulterior motive.  As such, I am of the opinion that trying to change someone’s way of life (even if it is at their own peril) isn’t right. Inform them if you want, but don’t have such bans because I think the people should be able to choose how they live their life. Unless I see more evidence to the impact of abuse, I say this is just an overreach of power by a modern area.

 

It seems that even though colonialism ended, the aboriginal way of life is still looked down upon. Under colonial times we learned how most of the colonist went to Africa because it was the "white man's burden" to "civilize". Australia wasn't too different. By looking down on these people, the colonist had no qualm about exterminating entire populations. At least the current leaders judgement of the Abortionist's way of life doesn't put the Abortionists entire life at risk. So it is better than the past, but no by much since the people's way of life is still in subject to constraint constrains that don't match how the society operates. I also think they were looked at in a hypocritical manner here too because alcohol and pron are all commodities sold throughout Australia without the same kind of restriction. 


I do think the life expectancy statistic and issue of child abuse is troubling. If a more supported cause of the problem were demonstrated, I would have to think pretty hard about regulating the society because I am not a huge fan of telling a local population how to live, yet there is clearly something going on that is harming the population.  

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 4:18 PM

The battle going on in this article is interesting because it is between the Australians of European ancestry and those of native ancestry.  The Aborigine community doesn't appreciate the fact that the Australian government is becoming paternalistic and setting up "racist" laws to fix a problem plaguing their community, child abuse.  It is also interesting to consider that as a response the Aborigines would shut down Uluru (Ayer's Rock) in protest.  The fact that tension exists between the two groups is not surprising however, due to the fact that the whites drove the Aborigines off their land and then put them in reservations (much like the United State's treatment of its Native American Population).  It is a shame that the Aborigines would shut down the tourist site just to teach the government a lesson, in a tourist sense of view.  However, it is also a great threat because it would hurt the pocketbook of the country so to speak and it could make the government change its policies that it is using to fix the problem in the Aboriginal communities.  The whole situation is complicated in my point of view because the problem should be fixed, but it needs to be handled in a way that the Aborigines do not feel discriminated against.

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Australia's tough anti-gang laws target tattooists

Australia's tough anti-gang laws target tattooists | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
In Sydney's trendy eastern suburbs, tattoo parlors are almost as ubiquitous as hairdressers.
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

While looking for interesting news sources relating to Australia, I came across this source that reveals that many tattoo artists are involved gang members.  I find this to be interesting because for some reason I would never associate gang activity with Australia.  Surprisingly to me, there are very tough anti-gang laws that now specfically target tattoo artists.  Some of these gangs are the same as those that exist in the United States, such as the Hells Angels.  How do these gangs spread globally?  This is a rather strange example of globalization.

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Maldives

Maldives | Geography 400 | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

The Maldives is an interesting country located in the Indian Ocean.  It was not originally made up of the 1200 islands that it has now.  Many of those islands are uninhabited and miniscule on a map.  The country is dominated by tourism which is important for the country.  What is also important to the country is its geographical future.  Many of the islands might vanish in years to come because of rising sea levels.  New islands can form as well as so many already have.  The future of this country merely relies on what is happening underwater.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:48 PM

Boy would I love to visit the Maldives. What an interesting and beautiful island it is.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:36 PM

Volcanic activity created the formation of coral reefs, which have sustained the development of larger Islands, including the Maldives. Due to pollution, the westernized Maldives have lost much of their bio-diversity, so indigenous people who always rely on fish for basic  survival are having problems. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:21 PM

With sea levels rising the Maldives will be under water relatively soon. This will leave all those people either dead or as refugees. There needs to be an effort to find out what to do with all those people because it is too late to stop the seas from rising.

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Mixing Past And Present In Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea, once home to cannibals, still has an exotic aura. The local tourist economy caters to those notions, and visitors may see a hybrid of the traditional and the modern.

 

This story is an intriguing blend--we see traditional cultures engaging in the global economy. They have created two villages: a traditional one designed for tourism filled with emblems of their folk cultures, and another one where people work, live eat and play with various markers of outside cultural and technological influence.

 

"Tourists are taking pictures. They don't want to take pictures of those who are in Western clothes.  People who are in Western clothes are not allowed to get close to people who are dressed up in the local dressings."

 

Questions to Ponder: Which village do you see as the more "authentic" one? How can culture also be a commodity?

 

Tags: folk culture, tourism, indigenous, culture, economic, rural, historical, unit 3 culture, Oceania.


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This NPR audio source reveals two totally different lives in Papua New Guinea.  There is one side that caters to tourism by showing the "old" Papua New Guinea.  This village promotes tourism and it has tours that show old, sort of primitive traditions in Papua New Guinea.  It is still important to the natives because it does preserve their past culture.  The villagers feel that the world is becoming so westernized that they cannot go back to the old ways of traditions such as cannibalism, wearing little clothing, etc., but when tourists travel to this village, those are the things they want to see.  The man in the audio source then traveled to another village where he witnessed how people of Papua New Guinea actually live, which is westernized.  I think that both villages are authentic.  One village represents their past culture and traditions and origins which is still important, and the other village represents globalization and the changes that the people of Papua New Guinea adapt to.  Culture can be a commodity because people such as westerners buy into what they think a country's particular culture is, even though that culture existed centuries ago and the culture has drastically changed since.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 7:54 PM

It frustrates me sometimes when Europeans, and Westerners travel to an uncommon land and expect the inhabitant of the land to act in barbaric ways. With the tourist who visit the land of Papua New Guinea, they are often times expecting the natives to act in an uncivilized manner, such as being cannibalistic. Yet, the natives have made great stride to keep up with the ever changing world in which they are a part of. One of the concerns that the elders have with the upcoming generation is how long will it be before their native language vanishes completely. One thing I can appreciate about the native people of this land is their capability to cast tourist from entering or engaging with the natives while they are in their native clothing. 

Kendra King's curator insight, May 3, 1:40 AM

The title of this article seemed to be a little bit of a misnomer given how the geographic forces impact Papua New Guinea. Part of the population caters to the tourist desire to see the "exotic." However, this Papaua New Guinea is in the past. While the rest of the population lives in the present where the citizens live without the tourist dictating how they live.   

 

Given the impact of the forces, the split makes figuring out which Papa New Guinea is actually the most "authentic" is tricky. There are elements of Papa New Guinea in each place. The perfect way to obtain authenticity is blending them as the title suggest, but that is not that case. Under the circumstances, I think the village in which tourist are not present are the most "authentic." It is because of the tourist that the past village exits and while some members of the population like that this helps preserve their past culture, Papa New Guinea has clearly started to move on.  It reminds me of the Plymouth plantation field trips in which the tourist view america during the times of the pilgrims. Clearly, America has moved on, but continues to honor their roots. Due to this idea of moving on, I think the other village that shows the present is more authentic because it is a closer measure of what the village realistically acts like without interference from the outside world.  


While, I realize Papa New Guinea is more than the past, a fair amount of the world doesn't. As a few tourist mentioned, they were eager to hear about cannibalism despite the practice stopping years ago. Yet, from an outsiders perspective, they don't see this other Papa New Guinea and because the country plays into this idea of a village stuck in the past, it gives the world the wrong impression. As such, I wonder how how much catering to the rest of the world holds Papa New Guinea back economically. Being perceived as less developed won't generate lenders and living up to that expectation curbs other modern economic sectors. So it seems the overall affect might actually be more detrimental then helpful from an economic stance.   

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 12:38 PM

I believe these indigenous people found a way to survive.  They were smart!  Globalization and tourism were gonna happen with or without them.  Now they found away to keep on existing.  Authentic?  How do they live their lives now, thats authentic.  The past history is just that, the past.  Its a commodity because they've found a way to exploit their culture to benefit them.  

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Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic

Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
Jakarta's traffic is legendary and locals have now become experts at finding ways to get around the jams, with some even making money out of them.

 

The population of Indonesia is heavily concentrated on the island of Java, and the capital city of Jakarta faces a tremendous strain on it's transportation network.  This video show that resourceful people will find inventive ways to make an unworkable situation manageable. 


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

Because of the extreme traffic in Indonesia's capital city of Jakarta, people find interesting ways to manage the situation.  There is a law that requires cars traveling into the central business district to have three or more passengers.  The requirement aims to have as many people entering the district as possible but in a lesser amount of vehicles to hopefully reduce traffic.  Interestingly enough, people sort of "hitchhike" and go in people's cars to make the cars able to enter the business district and the people make money doing this although it is illegal.  Many people are finding other ways to manage the traffic situation in this growing city.  Some suggest that the city should invest in a public transportation network that cities such as Bangkok and Singapore have in order to lessen the vehicle traffic.  This video really shows how globalization and urbanization impacts particular cities that are growing larger and larger in population and industry everyday.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:35 PM

The amount of traffic in Jakarta is staggering and the traffic itself has built up a business of making commuting to work easier. What is troubling is that the government hasn't made enough of an effort to fix the problem of traffic in its largest and most economically viable city. If Jakarta wants to keep growing the government has to step in and find a way to make getting to work realistic for Indonesians.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 9:38 PM

The traffic in Jakarta is insane, to be in a constant standstill on your way to work is unreal. The reporter in the video says that if the city of Jakarta continues on its current path, it could be "in a state of Paralysis" which for an entire city is not good. The traffic has, for some, become a way to make money, illegally but money nonetheless.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 9:01 PM

Humans instinctively look to profit when the situation arises, this is one of those situations. The government implemented regulations that barely seem to manage the traffic jams, i.e. having 3 people per car. Since people do have to work and may not always be able to meet the requirements, others have started making a living as a “jockey,” an individual who offers to ride in a car so the 3 people limit is met. Doing this is considered illegal. Yet, there aren’t good enough jobs for people to work (otherwise they won’t be a jockey) and those who do work can’t seem to always follow the rule without it harming there work life.  Plus, more police now turn their attention towards these people thereby deterring them away from their other duties. I realize that the state probably never intended these consequences to happen, but now that it is I really wonder just how useful this law really is. One thing is certain though, without better planning or economic innovation by the government, the jams will continue to happen.

 

I find it odd that the people keep staying despite the major traffic problem. As one interviewee mentioned. I guess as long as you can find ways to stay productive and still receive enough compensation, the time spend in traffic isn't enough of a hassle for them. As someone who has enough economic opportunity with far less wait time in traffic though, I would find this situation unbearable. Clearly, this isn't that case though. So, I am not sure of the immediate solution. As we learned in class, the government tried transmigration. This just lead to more problems. It was then suggested that the type of opportunity. If that is the case though, what should the government do now? Waiting for a more natural economic opportunity to get the people out of Jakarta won't happen quick enough to curb the increasing population growth. Therefore the strain on the infrastructure will continue because the population's carrying capacity is exceeded. Whatever the answers, I think this would be a great case study for urban planning and the impact raising car dependency has on a society as this driving nightmare shows just how important planning is with more cars. 

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BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest

BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
A simple initiative in the Philippines is bringing a bit of brightness into the lives of the country's poorest people.

 


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This is another source about the use of recycled soda bottles as light sources in the Philippines.  This idea amazes me because it shows what people are capable of doing to help themselves and others in impoverished places.  It is such a simple yet amazingly important initiative.

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 12:32 PM

The term "one man's trash is another man's treasure" is brought to new light with this video. Increased urbanization in the Philippines is creating a landscape of small, wall-to-wall huts with no windows. The lack of natural light coupled with limited energy resources makes these houses incredibly dark on the inside. One man figured out an ingenious  way to battle this issue while also reusing materials that otherwise would be considered trash. By using plastic soda bottles and a bleach solution, this man has created a type of skylight, providing light to those living in the slums of Philippines. 

 

This project has incredible potential not just in the Philippines, but on a global scale. Self-help housing all over the world could benefit from a light source while decreasing local problems with plastic waste.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:31 PM

This is very innovative as people in the Philippines have found a way to light their homes with just a plastic bottle. Using bleach and water and a piece of metal, there is temporary light for many people who would otherwise live in darkness. Starting with just 1 bottle in 1 home, this homemade product's total is now 15,000 units. I was very impressed that something as simple as a bottle filled with water can cost just $1 to make and give off even more light than an average light-bulb. I predict that this mini invention will become even more widespread as more poor countries catch on to this new, resourceful idea. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 3:45 PM

The solution to a problem in this video owes itself to geographical factors, had this been a problem in the US, the solution would have been different.  Having said this, the "American Way" to solve problems isn't always the best way to do so.  The Philippines is a collection of islands and they are ravaged by hurricanes, so to put above ground powerlines would be highly expensive, and to connect the whole nations infrastructure would require the nation running very expensive powerlines underneath the ocean.  What the man does in this video is ingenious given the location and the solution to the problem.  Since the Philippines are a warm country and the houses only have a single roof layer, by cutting a whole in the roof taping a coke bottle into the whole (filled with water and a bit of chlorine) allows a cheap and effective source of light.  By doing this, the people will not have to spend a great deal on electricity (if it is in their region) and if they do not have electricity then they still have a source of light. 

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Planting Rice

Thailand...

Feel free to mute the commentary...this video demonstrates the truly 'back-breaking' work that is a part of paddy rice farming. 


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This video shows the amount of work that goes into rice farming in Asian countries.  People of Asian countries heavily rely on rice as a staple in their diets.  These people take part in immense manual labor on small farms and farm rice for their own local consumption.  It is 'back-breaking' work and it shows what many people must do in order to get their food.  It is not as easy as driving down the street to the grocery store, as we take for granted in the United States and other nations.

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James Hobson's curator insight, December 3, 2014 2:01 PM

(Southeast Asia topic 4)

I think this goes to show that certain people just don't realize how easy parts of their lives are until they've either experienced or come to understand the lives of others. But then again, that could be a matter of stance. What to many business people, for example, may seem as back-breaking labor might be the polar opposite to outdoor lovers. Though obviously ricing is a labor-intensive task, I'm sure some people would prefer picking the crop to being stuck in an office all day.

    On a slightly different topic, it's extremely ironic how those who make basic life necessities possible (such as rice farmers) are paid (and even valued) so little compared to those in other occupations. Life can exist without luxury cars and fine jewelry, but not without staple foods like rice. In this way, these farmers are who really keep the populations fed.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 4:46 PM

This video truly highlights how some forms of agriculture today are still without mechanization and require incredible labor to harvest. Where we make use of massive machines that render planting and harvesting of crops incredibly easy the farmers of Thailand must rely solely on man power. Rice is already a difficult crop to grow as it must be dry at some points of it's growth and wet at others. This is just something to consider when eating ones rice at dinner. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:41 PM

Doing this all day must be exhausting. To imagine women and men who do this for their entire lives makes me respect their dedication and work ethic. It also makes me think of the toll it must take on your body doing that day in and day out.

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Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...

 


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This short video is pretty shocking and quite interesting.  It shows how megacities use every space possible to do business.  This shows the importance of urban planning and using space very efficiently.  The existence of megacities have been and still are on the rise and flexible urban planning must be considered when studying megacities.

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Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 9:15 PM

On the one hand this disturbed me. All I kept thinking when I saw the people go back on the tracks is that they could easily be killed.In fact, I wonder how many accidents have ever occurred near this area. All it would take is some sort of malfunction on the train in which the horn wasn’t sounding to provide ample warning or someone gets in another person’s way so there isn’t enough time to close down the shop. On the other hand, this made me realize just how efficient a population could become at using space. Everything was timed so that the entire area moved out of the way without an issue. So rather than let any land go to waste, the area uses it despite the risk to its population. Though it really isn't like the population has a choice though. So in instances where there is such overpopulation, it is interesting to see how well the society can adapt to the phenomenon. I do wonder what would happen if the country becomes more developed and the population declines. Would this type of land continue in the future or be disband? I know that in our country there are many laws that would make this illegal, but our country also has the space avoid developing the land in such a manner. When comparing it to the laws of the United States, I would think the country would eventually drift away from this use of land when possible. However, now that I watch the video, I have a new appreciation for maximizing land and I hope that the efficient could continue. Just in a less scary manner. 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:51 PM

Talk about using every inch of space available to you.  I find this video crazy not only because of the safety hazards, but just how people seem to go about this like it is normal.  This would never take place in America!

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 1:29 PM

An absolute amazing dynamic is seen in this video.  To say that Bangkok is trying to use most of its open space up would be an understatement.  In developed countries, you would not only never see this happen but you would not even see a thought of doing something like this.  There are violations every where you look.  

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Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
January and February are sweet times for most Chinese — they enjoy family reunions during the spring festival, which this year fell on January 23, and they celebrate Valentine’s Day, which is well-liked in China.

 

Gender roles in cultural norms change from country to country.  What also needs to be understood is how the demographic situation of a given country influences these patterns. 


Via Seth Dixon, Meagan Harpin
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This article is interesting as it discusses one example of how gender roles and cultural norms differ from country to country.  Chinese women who are around 30 years old and single are referred to as "leftover girls".  Similar to a growing trend in the United States, Chinese women are focusing on their careers and their own goals and waiting to marry until they find the right person and have their own lives in order.  However, in the United States, this way of life for women is more socially acceptable whereas in China, it is not as acceptable for these "leftover girls".

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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:32 PM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 2014 9:13 PM

Being 27 years old and unmarried in China considers you to be an old maid? I had to do a double take when I saw this. In the United States, 27 years old is around the average age a couple decides to get married. In China, Valentine's day is a really well liked holiday. Therefore, you would think that there would be excessive amounts of marriages, especially around this time. However, we know about the one child policy put into place at China. I can imagine that this might play a role because of the gender imbalances. As horrible as this sounds, in China, they call the women who are thirty and single "leftovers". During the season of the Chinese New Year and Valentine's Day, the "leftovers" just get questioned about their relationship status or go to matchmaking parties. However, the "leftovers" are said to have three good things; good career, good education and good looks. This is interesting because if they had all these good qualities, why would they still be single at 30 years old? As the article continues, we talk about true love and believe it or not, some "leftovers" still believe in true love and that they may experience that one day.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:14 PM

The fact that success relatively young women are seen as leftovers in China is a completely foreign idea to me.  n the United States we are seeing that more and more women are marrying later in life after they have received an education, higher education and have been established in a career.  Emily Liang is an extremely successful women who should be proud of her accomplishments, yet has to declare herself as "divorced" in order for men to think something isn't "wrong" with her.  It is extremely obvious that the role and view of women in China is significantly distorted. 

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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

Even though this video is an advertisement for Google, it is so cool.  The video is an indirect lesson of history.  That is, it teaches the long term effects of the India and Pakistan partition on people of these countries.  The partition sadly separated people who were very close to one another and this video/advertisement shows the effect that the partition had.

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 2:36 PM

This ad not only demonstrates how Google is allowing for people all over the world to come together, it is also an expertly devised commentary on a real life event that happened in this part of the world, and the emotional implications that it caused. The video shows how the grandchildren of two men were able to utilize Google in order to bring the two friends together after years apart. The two gentlemen were once good friends, but had not seen each other since the Pakistani-Indian conflict. The conflict tore families and friends apart, and remains today as a sensitive topic to those affected by the event. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:33 PM

This video is a perfect example of ho, especially in this day and age, the world can be brought closer together. In the video, two childhood friends are reunited after years of being apart, due to the conflicts go on their country. This shows one of the positive of the technology we have access to today, being able to bring together old friends by using new ways is great. This video also goes to show that even though the world is an enormous place, it can be made smaller.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:38 AM

This video is reminiscent of the families separated during the Korean war recently being allowed to visit one another. While tensions still exist between India and Pakistan many have begun to come to peace with the concept their nations won't be unified under either's rule. Because of this cooling of tensions families and friends are now able to see each other again after years without seeing them. Of course this is a Google commercial so the sincerity is somewhat diminished because of it's origins.

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Pakistan Trees Cocooned in Spider Webs

Pakistan Trees Cocooned in Spider Webs | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
Documented by an aid worker, millions of spiders took to the trees to spin their webs after heavy floods inundated Pakistan in 2010.

 

Besides being an aesthetic wonder, this image is a great way to start a discussion about so many distinct issues. The floods of 2010 devastated the human population, killing over 2,000. These same floods also altered the ecosystem as spiders have needed to adapt to their new inundated landscape as well. For the human population, this has had the shocking benefit of lowering the incidents of malaria since the spiders have more effectively limited the mosquito population. Interconnections...geographic information are a spider web of interconnections between nature and humanity.


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This National Geographic photo is interesting as it shows spider webs wrapped around trees during the 2010 floods in Pakistan.  While it may seem weird or gross to some, the fact that there were spider webs in the trees is actually very important in a geographical context because spiders eat mosquitos, meaning the incidents of malaria were lowered during this time.

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Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:07 AM

As cool as it is creepy. I'm reminded of entire fields of spider webs after similar heavy flooding in Australia. I certainty would get nowhere near those trees if this were to happen locally.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 2:29 PM

Intense flooding occurring in December 2010 left 2,000 people dead in Pakistan. The flood waters left both the people, and the insects, with no where to go. Spiders, trying to escape from the flood waters, climbed into trees and bushes in order to avoid drowning. Almost every type of vegetation was covered in webs, making the landscape appear as though it was planed in cotton candy trees. While definitely peculiar, the massive amounts of spider webbing averted a mosquito crisis. While something positive did come from this occurrence, most of the trees were killed since their leaves were smothered by the webbing and unable to collect sunlight. Now the landscape contains little to know shade for the people living their. 

 

When observing geographies, it is important to understand not just the people, but the other organisms that affect a place, and how they too can make an effect. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 8:19 AM

These floods damaged the ecosystems in Pakistan. It also manipulated the natural order of things. With he heavy floods lots of mosquito were attracted by the water and then millions of spiders followed for food. What resulted are these remarkable images. For those who suffer from arachnophobia this may their worst nightmare but it has an odd beauty to it.

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Selective Abortions Blamed For Girl Shortage In India

Selective Abortions Blamed For Girl Shortage In  India | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
Much of Indian culture regards boys as assets to families and girls as liabilities.
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This is an NPR article about female feticide.  Female feticide has been a growing trend in India.  Families who are expecting a child undergo ultrasounds to learn the gender of the fetus, and if it is a girl, the mothers abort the fetus.  Families would rather have boys because they are less expensive to care for than girls and because boys are culturally seen as a bigger asset to the Indian family.  Female feticide is a problem in India because it creates a disproportion between girls and  boys.  For every 1,000 boys under age 6, there are only 940 girls, while the worldwide average is 986 girls for every 1,000 boys.  This causes a problem when it comes time for boys to get married because there is a shortage of girls.  Also, if girls are not born, then reproduction will slow down to the point where it could end.

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'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan | Geography 400 | Scoop.it

The news from the Philippines, where it's feared that last week’s powerful Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 10,000 people, isn’t getting better as hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive and authorities struggle to get help to them.

 

"Its absolute bedlam right now," says Richard Gordon, head of the Philippine Red Cross.  “There's an awful lot of casualties, a lot of people dead all over the place, a lot of destruction.”

 

According to the BBC, a huge international relief effort is underway, but rescue workers have struggled to reach some towns and villages cut off since the storm.

 

Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, Philippines.


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

Even though the death toll resulting from Typhoon Haiyan is around 1,000, it is expected to reach 10,000.  International aid will hopefully help cities such as Tacloban City recover from this storm.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:00 PM

Just the remoteness of the area is going to hinder the relief efforts.  Even though the supplies are getting through it is getting through to the areas that need it the most is the problem.  When the infrastructure is not that good to begin with, the damage done by this kind of disaster is multiplied.  Look at New Orleans when Katrina hit.  It still took days for relief and just water to get where it was needed.  Imagine what that would have been like if the infrastructure was like like that of the Philippines.  The country is overwhelmed by this disaster and needs the help.  Its getting it but the problem still exists of how to distrbute it now that it is there.  Makes you wonder if Subic Bay was still open as a US military base if it would have made it easier.  Sometimes having a military base is not a bad thing.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:16 PM

This is insane. It has affected millions of people and and even killed people. Its good that so many people are going to help though.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:05 PM

With so many of the citizens living on the coast, a large typhoon like this completely destroys most of the country. When this much devastation happens all at one time it takes a very long time to recover.

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Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...

Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This is such a cool photo and interesting phenomenon.  The photo is of Lake Hillier, a pink-colored lake located on Middle Island, one of 105 islands that make up an archipelago off the coast of Western Australia.  There are many scientific speculations as to why the lake is pink.  I find it to be very interesting and wonder more about the lake, such as if it effects the marine life in the lake and if its color effects the ability or inability to use the water as a natural resource.

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 11:44 PM

The pink lake, Lake Hillier,  located in Western Australia is stunning. The aerial view of the lake makes the lake seem unreal that is was is fascinating. What gives the lake its pink color is a mystery, but it may be from bacteria, but it shows how some places in the world are affected differently than others and it produces remarkable results.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:48 AM

Now this is bizarre.  A pink lake and no one is really sure as to why it is pink.  It is not on the top of my list of places to go swimming, that is for sure.  Although scientists don't seem too concerned about the safety of the lake for people but are curious as to what is causing the lake to be pink.  Thoughts on algea and bacteria levels or the amount of salt are included in the potential reasoning for the pink color.  Even on google earth you can see that the lake is in fact pink.  Even when scientists come to a conclusion as to what is causing the pink colored lake, as far as it isn't causing any environmental issues, I think that the lake should be left pink as a type of wonder of the world attraction for people to see.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 11:54 AM

This article caught my eye because I have never seen a pink lake before. This lake is on Middle Island in Western Australia. The lake is 600 meters wide but the reasoning behind the color of it is still yet to be determined. White salt rims the lake and the color may be caused from a low nutrient concentration and even just bacteria. The pictures of this lake are beautiful and there is not anything like it. 

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Bye-bye Bora Bora -- 15 other islands in French Polynesia

Bye-bye Bora Bora -- 15 other islands in French Polynesia | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
From Fakarava to Rangiroa, French Polynesia's "other" islands are great fun to say, even better to visit.
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This CNN link explores Polynesian islands that many people have never even heard of.  Many choose the popular, well-known Polynesian islands, such as Bora Bora, as vacationing destinations, but there are many "other" islands that might be even better destination spots that so many do not know about.  I wonder what makes a particular island more well known than another.  How do people choose which island to vacation on?  Is the popularity of Bora Bora over other "better" Polynesian islands a coincidence or is that done on purpose?

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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This is an interesting article.  I knew of the International Date Line, but I did not know anything about it or what it meant.  It is a line that is roughly opposite the Prime Meridian that when crossed, the day advances forward, from Monday to Tuesday for example.  The line is interesting because it is meant to not stir any problems.  It goes through Siberia and the North Pacific Ocean since virtually no one lives in those areas.  Even though less people live in the Pacific and South Pacific Islands than say, Europe and Africa or North and South America, people still do live here and they are negatively affected by the date line.  American Samoa and Samoa, two islands made up of the same ethnic groups, are separated by the date line.  Being separated by time zones affecting people by a few hours seems bad enough, but being separated by an entire day just does not work for many people.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:18 PM

Makes you think about the political and economic influences on just about anything. What time or day it is is an important element to a global economy. Know when business deals can be made in an instance knowing what standards are most efficient can alter systems of dating. That is why instead of having a straight line the line is jutting out in spots. Usually we think of our time zones being dependent on where the sun in relation to our location but in this instance we see that it is merely a man made line that can be altered. 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 1:06 PM

This is to me the coolest geographic location in the World... A group of islands nation located in both the south and north hemispheres and also to both the east and west of the international time line zone.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, May 1, 8:06 PM

500 birthdays were taken away due to an international date line. In Samoa is in a confused state between the united states and the Asian pacific side of the timeline which would cause time and dates to be confusing.Dynamic economic networks and political allegiances have created a very difficult situation for the people near the border in Samoa.  The International Date line in Samoa is something that is needed to be watched and paid attention because it can affect people in ways that can be very significant even at a small tiny rate.

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Vanuatu: Meet The Natives

"Five men from the remote Pacific island of Tanna arrive in America to experience western culture for the first time, and force us to look at ourselves through brand new eyes..."

 

This cross-cultural experiment reinforces numerous stereotypes, but also seeks to get viewers to look at issues from a variety of perspectives.  Folk cultures, modernization and globalization are all major themes of this show.     


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This video is a trailer for a television show called Meet the Natives, which not surprisingly did not have many episodes.  The show featured five men from a Pacific island and their visit to the United States where they experienced American culture for the first time.  It is evident in just the trailer that the show reinforced many stereotypes of Pacific islanders and Americans that are obviously not necessarily true.  The video shows Pacific islanders living very primitively which is not at all the case.  It is important to view these stereotypes with a critical eye so that we do not simply believe everything we see and think everything we see is the truth.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 9, 11:16 PM

Not only Vanuatuan individuals, but we see many different cultured people visit america to experience technological lives that poor economic nations wouldn't be able to experience. Vanuatuan homes are not as fancy, strongly built or even as big as buildings that you'll find in the United States and I think it was a good opportunity for people of Vanuatu to witness how other people live especially when it's more advanced than their cultures. Vanuatu won't find roller coasters, concerts or many other entertainment experiences in their region like they would in America. I live in a region full of technology and entertainment and I could only imagine if I was visiting an area that had more like what Vanuatu was experiencing. Since, America and Vanuatu was experiencing each other's culture styles, it helps them even out their living conditions and what the higher economic region (United States) can do to help the lower economic region. (Vanuatu)

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 4:34 PM

This is an interesting concept because it switches who the anthropologists are in essence.  The United States becomes the foreign and exotic land being studied by people who are not native to its ways or customs.  It also lets the villagers address globalization in their own way, they get to go to America and see how the civilization lives compared to their own.  Although this sounds like a funny, reality tv show it was pulled from the air because some people didn't like what it was really doing, Americans were getting a laugh from people  "less sophisticated" than us coming to the US.  In the show, the natives also reinforce many regional stereotypes that exist in the US' own borders.  Geographical inspired tv can be a controversial place at times.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, May 1, 6:59 PM

This is a very interesting as both men travel to America from a place where they have lived all their lives. A cross cultural experiment that shows globalization and modernization and how it takes effect. its pretty interesting as i know multiple people who have had to adjust to the lives in the western worlds, and try to find a place within the society and try to blend in, but end up hating it and moving back to their roots so its a very interesting take on modernization, global culture with the culture they are used to.

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Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style

Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
A former gang member from Long Beach, California, teaches break dancing to at-risk youth in Cambodia.

 

This video is a great example of cross-cultural interactions in the era of globalization.  Urban youth culture of the United States is spread to Cambodia through a former refugee (with a personally complex political geography).  What geographic themes are evident in this video? How is geography being reshaped and by what forces?


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This video posted by the New York times focuses on a former gang member from Long Beach, California who teaches break dancing and other lessons to at-risk children in Cambodia.  This shows the impact that globalization has on the world.  Certain types of music and dancing spread and become popular worldwide and the lessons taught by the music and culture also spread internationally.  The man from California uses dancing to teach children across the globe in a world that is different but also similar to his own.  Geography is being reshaped by cultural interests such as music and dancing in order to teach important lessons to children.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 4:40 PM

Very similar to the previous cricket article this video shows another way those in areas of poverty and crime are pulled together and united. In this case instead of a sport it is break dancing. This dancing amongst former gang members helps to relieve tension form the area and also hopefully lead them to achieve better and loftier things. By shifting the priorities of people away from harm to themselves and others and replacing it with an activity which focuses on self improvement and community.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:39 PM

It's crazy to think this gang member was deported back to his country that he had never been before.  It's nice to hear a positive story where the gang member used his experience to make a positive contribution to today's youth.  We don't need more gang bangers, but we definitely need more positive influences.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 5:30 PM

Globalization is a major role in this video, as a former gang member this young man was moved back to a place where he had no previous contact with a place where his family was born. Themes of globalization is evident in this video as this gang member is using what he learned in California to teach the youth around his area in Cambodia. Cultural geography plays into this video and its being used in a way to influence other children to escape their situations around them and just enjoy themselves and be informed about life decisions very good video.

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Video: Fighting Poverty with Ingenuity

I absolutely love creative, out-of-the-box, innovative people! People who use their creativity to make a difference in the World.... Incredible! "We want to ...

 


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This video is truly amazing and so interesting.  I wonder how people come up with the idea to put the water and bleach in a soda bottle to create light in very dark homes.  Just getting people in the United States to properly recycle their soda bottles is difficult enough, nevermind getting people to think outside of the box and create new innovations that save money and really work.  The man who created these light sources is seen as a true hero in this area because he has helped so many.  This video is incredible and is really telling of what people are able to do to help others if they just put in the time.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 4:31 PM

This another fantastic example of people in areas of little and poverty making due with that they have on hand. While many in America can imagine life without our modern necessities in fact both historically and contemporary people have always determined ways to get the fullest extent out of the materials at hand. This video shows how innovation and some common good is able to help the whole community. We in the Western World can definitely learn a few things from situations such as this.   

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:49 PM

Poverty stricken areas are filled with very intelligent and skilled people who are trapped in their economic status. These solar bottles show how creative people can be no matter where they come from. Furthermore, these types of innovations show how the sadness of living in poverty can be lifted a small amount with recycling and creativity.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 9:18 PM

This is such a fantastic idea. Once again, in an area that is forced to adapt people will. Here  the “Solar Demi” was able to work within his environment to come up with an alternate way to light homes. It is great that he is doing this given how it affects the areas health and productivity.

Some people in the United States may think this contraption beneath them though. However, I also think that in some ways this is a better form of energy for places that have the access to solar light. I know that most electric lighting in our country uses some form of fossil fuel, which impacts the environment in an adverse manner when used too much. Since the ozone layer is already doing poorly, areas that are trying to develop would just as more harm to the equation. So I love this, not just for the creativity but also because it seems to be more economically friendly.

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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This video is so shocking.  It shows the disregard for worker safety in China.  Chinese companies cut corners and do not spend money on things such as wages and worker safety policies and organizations.  Yes, this might boost the Chinese economy and allow China to save money and produce as much as possible for cheap, but this is not okay for workers.  Imagine if OSHA saw this video.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:23 PM

This video borders on difficult to watch. While it is definitely amazing to watch it really flies in the face of standard American job safety operations. These workers are perched on top of this building with no harnesses balancing in the shovel of a back hoe while sawing loose great slabs of concrete. Luckily no one was injured in this video but frankly this video does a great job of showing how China has been able to grow so rapidly. A lack of interest in individual workers safety and a sole goal of progress, at the possible cost of its citizens.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 9:45 PM

China has one of the strongest economies in the world. However, I think sometimes, China takes that for granted. They think that just because they have a strong economy, they don't have to worry about safe working environments and they have nothing to lose if something happens to someone. As much as I'm sure China gives good paychecks to manufactured workers because of its wealth, there are some jobs, such as this one, that they think they don't have to pay enough. However at the same time, it's not China's fault. Sometimes, it's the workers faults for not using common sense while working, I'm a firm believer in "work smarter, not harder."

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:32 PM

Well nobody ever accused China of being a Union favoring country.  These people are risking their lives because its their job.  This is a country where you have very little leeway to argue for benefits.  If they want to do this, then come to the US.  Although I wonder why they don't just use dynamite?  Faster and few people are involved.  

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China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says

China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says | Geography 400 | Scoop.it
China announces it will relax its one-child policy and abolish labor camps, the state-run Xinhua news agency reports.

Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

For people with absolutely no education on China or Chinese history, they most likely have at least heard of the One Child Policy.  Even if they do not know the policy's details or its many exceptions, they do know that the policy exists in China.  This article is interesting in that it describes more changes that are being made to the policy to hopefully promote human rights in China.  Even though the One Child Policy lowered China's population, many Chinese believe that the policy hurts their families because it creates loneliness and it leads to abortions and heavy fines for having a second child.  Now, if one parent was an only child, that family may have a second child to ease loneliness.  There are many other exceptions to the policy, but hopefully new changes promote human rights and allow families to live better.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 5:09 PM

The one-child policy has caused more problems than it has solved. China now has a larger male population than its female population and competition for brides is rampant. The labor camps were not actually training people in the way they wanted to, it was just an excuse to lock up people for petty crime and get free labor out of them. Hopefully, China will continue analyzing their social policies and making changes to better the country

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:32 PM

The one-child labor law is one that should be extinct now. China needs to up their standards of living and allow people their freedom of choice. Who cares if the living situations are crammed to begin with? People need to have their right to choose how many children they do or don't have.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2:32 PM

As of November 2013, this CNN article says that Beijing, China plans to get rid of their one-child policy and also abolish labor camps. Sterilization and forced abortions are going to be eased upon, after the urging from many nations over the last 3 decades. CNN asks people in the street how they felt about this ease up. Citizens eagerly report that they plan on having 2 children. China is also facing an again population, which is probably why the government is changing their radical policy practiced since the 70’s. Another main outcome of this new policy is the abolishment of the labor camps called “reeducation through Labor” which put people in jail for up to 4 years without a trial. 

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Once a Producer, China is now a Consumer

China is now the world's largest car market, and a crucial one for Detroit companies. Chinese consumers bought 18.5 million vehicles last year, and foreigners, especially Americans, have played a key role in developing the industry.

 

China now is the world's largest auto market as China is no longer simply a place where things are produced.  China has become a major consumer of goods as their workers wages allow them to consume more goods. 

 


Via Seth Dixon, Meagan Harpin
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This is an interesting headline and topic because so many Americans blame China for job loss, when in reality, China is no longer at the forefront of manufacturing and industry.  China is consuming from foreign markets, such as the United States, just as it has been producing and manufacturing goods.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:00 PM

China has become the worlds largest car market and General motors planned to open another 600 dealerships because it sells more cars in China then it does in the US. China have even become a bigger consumer in of goods, when this atricle was released they were purchasing 18.5 million worth of goods. That has alot to do with the increased pay they are now recieving as well.  

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:07 PM

The car culture in the United States has made us a very lucrative customer for foreign auto industries. Our infrastructure is build around the automobile, we built our highway system, suburban communities and other support systems to encourage auto use. In China, they may need to consider the way their countries is structured and whether or not heavy automobile use will be functional. In Jakarta we see massive traffic jams because they are not equipped to handle more people driving to work.

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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This video is incredibly interesting in that it describes just what it means to be the fastest growing megacity in the world.  Every year, hundreds of thousands of people are moving to Dhaka, Bangladesh from smaller towns outside the capital city.  The current population of Dhaka is 15 million but people are migrating to the city so quickly that it does not take very long for the census data to become outdated.  People are moving to Dhaka with hopes of a better life for themselves and their families.  Their situation upon moving goes from worst to bad.  People move out of slums and squatter settlements in their hometowns into other slums and squatter settlements in Dhaka, but they still believe they are beginning a better life.  There are many interesting aspects of this video.  For one, there is a girl who is happy because she works in a fabric factory and she might receive a $4/month increase in pay.  To us in the United States, this is nothing, but to her, it is a huge help to her and her family.  Also, there is a girl who could rarely afford fish or meats but she can now buy one good piece of meat each week because she can afford it in Dhaka.  While there are many glimpses of hope and opportunities to live better lives in Dhaka as seen in this video, there are many geographical implications for Dhaka as it becomes larger and larger each day.  The government is very informal and people who move to Dhaka do not have any land to build homes on, so they build illegally on someone else's land.  Also, traffic on Dhaka's streets is, for lack of a better term, insane.  The city just cannot handle all of the migration from elsewhere.  Resources such as clean water and food are very slim.  Even though Dhaka might suffer as a city due to its rapid growth and inability to support everyone, newcomers still choose Dhaka as the gateway to a better life.

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:21 PM

I recently did a project on the topic of megacities in the past, present, and future and how the natural risks they posed.  In past decades there was Tokyo, New York City, or even Mexico City.  I also covered present cities such as Shangai and Los Angeles to name a few.  The city that basically topped the growth charts in my statistics was Dhaka.  The city literally is growing like a chia pet, but with no direct plan or proper use of land.  According to future calculations, the city of Dhaka can reach roughly 23 million by 2025, that's about 600,000 new people coming in every year up until that point.  This video is just an example of how poorly planned this megacity is, and what the future holds for all of the people living there.  It's simply chaos.  There are already squatter settlements and unorganized living conditions for the current residents, picturing the population to grow even more is outrageous!

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 2014 11:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

Rescooped by Rebecca Farrea from Geography Education
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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | Geography 400 | Scoop.it

"The name of the country Pakistan has a fascinating history - it is essentially an acronym!  Prior to 1947, the country now known as Pakistan was a British colony. In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to the region under a new name, Pakistan. The name had been developed by a group of students at Cambridge University who issued a pamphlet in 1933 called Now or Never."

 

In a country with such great ethnic divisions, a common religion is a powerful nationalizing force.  As the capital city of Islamabad's toponym powerfully states (the house or abode of Islam), religion remains an important element of national identity for Pakistanis.   


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

It is interesting to learn how particular countries got their names.  Pakistan was a British colony until 1947 and it was given the name Pakistan as an acronym for the 8 homelands in the country.  Pakistan is so ethnically divided that religion is really important for the country to stay together.

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James Hobson's curator insight, November 11, 2014 12:55 PM

(South Asia topic 5)

The name "Pakistan" can be thought of as more of a "Mexicali" or "Calexico" than an "Afghanistan" or "Turkmenistan." In other words, it is an acronym, which I was surprised to learn. Though is can also be translated as "land of the Paks", there is no specific group by that name. Relating back to a previous Scoop, this shows the importance of validation and reasoning, as opposed to 'blind belief.'

I think the use of an acronym for the new nation's name (a toponym) was a very intuitive option to choose; no ethnic group could complain that their name didn't make it into the name of their nation while others' did. This seems to be a form of equal representation.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:28 AM

This article is very interesting as it explains the origin of the name Pakistan. Like many people I assumed that the name had to do with some old ethnic group but in reality its something of an acronym. Interestingly enough Pakistan is incredibly diverse and really only held together by the common Islamic religion. Names which are acronyms are more common place in government plans or cheesy infomercial products rather than the names of countries.     

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 3:15 PM

Pakistan is simply abbreviated from it's nations or nations that border Pakistan. P stands for Punjab, A stands for Afghania, K stands for Kashmir, I stands for Iran, S stands for Singh, T stands for Tukharistan, A stands for Afghanistan. However, there is no "N." Instead we classified the last letter as Balochistan but because "stan" is the Persian pronunciation for "country." Pakistan decided to abbreviate "N" as a silent so they can successfully abbreviate "Pakistan" instead of "Pakista."

Rescooped by Rebecca Farrea from Geography Education
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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?  


Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Farrea's insight:

This article explains that while more than half of the Indian population has access to technology such as cell phones, televisions, and DVD players, less than half has a toilet in their home.  I could not wrap my head around that statement when I first heard it in class, but after reading the article on my own, it is a little bit clearer.  Individuals in India are able to support themselves economically as the middle class is growing, which is a positive statement, but the Indian government cannot keep up with the growth.  Therefore, an individual may have a cell phone, but no toilet because the government cannot supply enough clean water for the people.  It seems like the individual is stronger and more sufficient than the government.  What might this mean for the future of the Indian government?

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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:10 AM

Government in India may be ill equipped to handle the need for sewage, sanitation and clean water. These items are harder to come by than cell phones and televisions. Over 1/2 of the country lacks basic sanitation, but yet, have cell phones. This dystopia is leading to even people climbing out of poverty from having some of the basics needed for a healthy life.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 29, 2014 3:41 PM

Its interesting in a country as large as India, its number one problem is waste management. Its telling of the priorities of the country's leader and it also speaks on the country's reception of first world waste. While more than half of Indians have access to a cell phone device, television and other electronic products, its also embarrassing on the country's behalf that less than half of the country's population have access to toilets.

I believe the case for this is Indian government not have the proper equipment to be able to establish properly install proper sanitation in the land. In order for the government to put in place they would need to establish a proper pipelines throughout the land to ensure that once toilets are set in place, waste is properly disposed of.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:59 AM

This sound clip highlights an interesting issue today in India, as the population has exploded the logistics to support these people is nonexistent while access to modern technology is present. Its an odd concept that one can readily find cheap accessible technology such as cell phones or TVs yet something as basic as a toilet or running water is out of reach for many. This is the problem when a population expands faster than it is possible to increase its logistical capacity.