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Islamist killed in Tunisia clash

Islamist killed in Tunisia clash | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

The violence that continues to break out in this part of the world is terrible. In the U.S., we have little to worry about in terms of political and religious violence, but in the Middle East and North Africa, this has become an everyday occurrence. Not only are militants killed, but innocent people are often victims of terrorist attacks and other sorts of violence. The democratic process is very uncommon in this part of the world, so violence and terror is used to achieve their means.

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Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting

Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

It is amazing how valuable land is across the globe. Countries rush and battle for submerged areas of land that have yet to reach sea level. The benefits to claiming these lands, however, are endless. Perhaps the nation can sell the real estate to speculators who could build luxury homes. Maybe the island will be rich in natural resorces ripe for plunder. Plus, the ownership of a 200 nautical mile radius is not bad either. In a world where untapped resources and unexplored land is no longer plentiful, islands like these provide endless opportunities.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:56 PM

These soon-to-be island would sure make one interesting auction.  Many of the small landforms in the world, and especially Pacific have always been contested by powerhouses such as China, Japan, or other smaller countries.  Having control isn't for the island itself necessarily but for what the ocean waters surrounding the landform may contain.  It could be fishing, trade routes, or even oil or natural gas settlements.  It makes it even more intersting when many of these underground landforms are possible volcanoes considering the majority of active volcanoes are underwater and near the ring of fire.

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 1:25 PM

This isn't an article from Oceania necessarily, but one that pertains to it. In an area made up of small island nations, the literal overnight emergence of new ones can change the politics of the surrounding countries, and even the number of seats at the United Nations in the far future.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 8:23 PM

When I read something like this all I can think is maybe this is what happened to Atlantis.  What if Atlantis was an island like this that existed just long enough for people to build a society on and then it sank beneath the sea.  Another think this makes me think of is the novel “Jingo” by Terry Pratchett, in it an island rises from the sea and leads to a war over which country owns it.  This is just an interesting phenomenon that leads to world arguments.

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Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed?

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed? | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

This model shows how interconnected the world is now. Acid raid caused by factories in Michigan used to land in Canadian lakes, ruining the ecosystem. Today, debris from Asia washes ashore on America's West coast, dirtying its beautfiful beaches and likely harming its ecosystem as well. It is unreal to think that over 900,000 metric tons of debris is floating throughout the vast Pacific as a result of the 2011 tsunami. I would guess that in island nations throughout the Pacific, massive amounts of debris have washed ashore. This is an unintended consquence of globalization and urbanization. Weather phenomenons and mother nature are unpredictable and also very deadly.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 5:02 PM

This video showed time elasped which stopped in the summer of 2013, it is now December.  At the time of the video the mass was entering the eastern part of the Pacific Ocean so I'm curious to where it is now.  I can't find any current imagery of the vast ocean but it would be a neat, yet dangerous spectacle.  I could only imagine any of the harm it's causing on the sealife on its way across the pacific.  We can only hope that doesn't bring too many issues once it washes up on the west coast, if at all.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:09 PM

Hopefully none of the wreckage that reaches the US is radioactive.... But the projected travel of the debris shows how ocean currents create, almost, a "natural" globalization of natural disasters. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 10:43 AM

Although it's important to know where all of this trash is headed, this just makes me think of how we might prevent this. We can't prevent these catastrophic natural disasters, but how might we lessen it's effects on our cities and settlements? Furthermore, how might we lessen our impact on ecosystems during these times of catastrophe? 

It's only called a catastrophe when it hits human populations for a reason, it's not just devastating to us. Remnants of our lifestyle are carried far and wide, able to cause harm on many other species. 

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Penguins from Space: A New Satellite Census Doubles the Known Population of Emperors

Penguins from Space: A New Satellite Census Doubles the Known Population of Emperors | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

Geospatial technology has allowed scientists to accurately measure Antarctica's Emperor Penguin population for the first time. The results blew their minds as they accounted for 595,000 penguins in over 46 herds. This is far more than they believed existed after conducting previous studies. This just goes to show just how a lack of human presence allows a species to grow and flourish. The vast ice sheets of Anarctica allow these penguins to grow at astronimical rates. However, with these polar ice sheets gradually melting, these penguins may be in danger very soon. Scientists will have to monitor the situation closely.


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:17 PM

I wonder when this geospatial technology will be used to spy on humans, maybe it already has! It is important, however, to learn more about Antarctica, the alien continent of the world. This is a victory for science.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 8:26 PM

The use of modern technology to better understand nature is fascinating.  The ability to count penguins from space in a way that could not happen without satellites because of the harsh environment.  Maybe someday they will find bigfoot with a satellite or maybe not.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 10:22 AM

Our world is changing rapidly. Both due to human activity and natural climate patterns. It's important to be able to quantify the effects of this change in order to understand how our world will continue to change. If we can correlate these specific changes in climate and weather patterns and declining/rising species populations we may be able to protect important species in decline and manage those on the rise. Using geospatial technologies is vital in studying these changes and will only improve and become more valuable in time.

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Turbulence on the Mekong River

Turbulence on the Mekong River | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

The Mekong Rivers and its powerful waters provide industrial opportunities. This river was primitive and very untouched by civilization even as recently as when the United States was present in the region during the Vietnam War. This 5,000 km river can employ many citizens in industrial sectors as they build over 70 dams in Laos alone, but there is also collateral damage. Many fisherman are unhappy, claiming that the dam will block channels crucial for migratory fish, damaging the multi-billion dollar fishing industry. However, even village leaders are in support of dams which will greatly advance the area and improve the economy.


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Michelle Carvajal's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:04 PM

There must be a better way to transport items and in return save the Mekong river from being degredated. Technological innovations are affecting the life in the river as local fishermen are seeing less and less fish traveling in the river. This is impacting them in the sense that they use these fish for their survival as well as for selling. They fear that in building dams and creating advanced roads over the Mekong will change their enviroment altogether and will hinder their livelihood. This is a beautiful river and I personally feel there could be a better way but there is always something sacrficed when the government choses a location to build on. - M. Carvajal

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 30, 2013 8:03 PM

It seems to be a theme that across the bored, people are building things that directly and negatively impact the environment and the local people. There are always two sides to the problem. On one hand, the dam can help with the development of Laos because it will bring in money, but it will also destroy the fish population and therefore many fishermen will lose their jobs and people will lose a food source. It is a difficult problem because Laos needs money because there is a lot of poverty in this rural country and the fishermen do not add a whole lot to the economy, but the people need a way to survive and make money for their families as well. It's a problem that I think will be around for generation to come.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 26, 2013 11:35 AM

Seems the price of modernizing will be the local economy that as existed here for centuries.  It is not a small industy either, it is according to the report a billion dollar fishing industry.  However with a growing population and a demand for electricity the river is the perfect source for this power.  This globalization, like all globalization, will help some and will hurt some.  What you have to ask yourself is will it help more than it hurts?  Will it help in the long run, over time?  For everyone involoved in globalization these answeres are never the same everywhere.

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Drought led to demise of ancient city of Angkor

Drought led to demise of ancient city of Angkor | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

While it is very unfortunate that this ancient kingdom eventually fell, it still remains a sense of pride in Cambodians from Cambodia to America. Many decorate their body with Angkor Wat as a symble of national pride. It is very interesting that this symbol of urban success lies in an area that is today very agrarian and sparsely settled. The collapse of Angkor Wat has me drawing similarities to ancient Mayan ruins, as sprawling metropolis exist, but we have no record of a collapse.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 8:50 PM

Scientists have found that the ancient city of Angkor failed do to drought. Angkor has a system of moats, channels, and reservoirs, so with such a system in place how could they have such a drought? Simply there water system was unable to to handle the change in climate.  

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:38 PM

This new study shows that even back in time people struggled with environmental challenges. We normally think of people in the past as being much more adaptive to their environments and that only in the modern age nature and humans have come into conflict. The surrender of Angkor Wat to drought shows that even though we have amazing technology today, water is still a staple of life. 

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 12:29 PM

It's easy to forget that for most of history, even the greatest of empires were subject to the whims of the climate. The ability to survive in places where humans really shouldn't thrive is only a recent development thanks to technology, but a drought is something the mightiest army can't fight, and all the wealth in the world will not stop, without the right technology.

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Worker safety in China

The worker safety in China, or lackthereof, shows why they are allowed to advance to newfound heights economically. They cut corners on workers safety, environmental regulations and other codes to meet capitalist interests. The workers risk their lives daily for meager wages that are often below sustenance levels. Hopefully they will modify their system of codes soon.


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:13 PM

This video is jaw-dropping proof of how China cuts corners in their quest for growing their economy. With such a large population looking for work China does not really need to protect their workers. I wonder if China will experience a labor movement similar to the one in the US that introduced protective legislation.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 9:19 AM

This video shows a complete lack of concern for worker safety in China. The workers use the backhoe as a makeshift platform so one of them can cut the rebar suspending a massive piece of concrete from the side of the building. These kinds of shortcuts are the ways which China is able to keep a competitive edge in the world market. With hardly any regard for fair wages, worker safety, or worker rights, China is able to manufacture goods for prices no one else can compete with. Eventually, China will face opposition from its workforce as its industry matures and the government can either appease them or face revolution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:47 PM

In Beijing, workers safety is not a top priority. This video may shock viewers to the extreme levels workers will go to for such a small paycheck. This worker, many stories up climbs onto an excavator to be lowered down to a area that could not be reached. It is insane how these unsafe conditions compare to Americas. It makes you wonder how China has such a growing economy and a global leader when when things like this are happening on a day to day basis.

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Protests, Self-Immolation Signs Of A Desperate Tibet : NPR

Chinese renewed efforts to crack down on Tibet, refusing to give them basic freedoms only worsens the cause. Tibetans will only fight harder as more and more of their rights are taken away by the Chinese. These beliefs are deeply entrenched in the religion of the Tibetans who offer their lives as signs of protest. Self-immolation is not a new practice, but goes back years and years with other very famous instances such as Thich Quan Duc's display in protest of the Vietnam War. While not so logical, this practice is a very strong symbol that oppressed people can only take so much subjection.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:39 PM

China has tightened their security around the Tibetan monestary and the monasteries seem to be emptying out. Monks have been setting themselves on fire in protest against Chinese repression. This is a sign of desperation from the monks.  

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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

Shanghai has turned into a global city very literally right before our eyes. With the collapse of the USSR, the elimination of trade barriers and the free flow of goods brought a great deal of business to China and the rest of East Asia. In a mere 20 years, Shanghai has transformed from a city on the periphery to one of the most important cities in our entire world. Skyscrapers that once only existed in the West now soar high across the East Asian skyline.


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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:02 PM

Shanghai could arguably be the best example of globalization in the world today. In the span of 20 years, it has gone from a sparse city with some commerce on the river to a major urban center with the skyscrapers and neon lights. The transformation between the two images is staggering and it's easy to see the resemblance between current day Shanghai and it's partner globalized cities like New York and Seoul.

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 11:23 AM

Apart from what can be said about the process of Globalization, this is just impressive under the lens of what can be done in 20 years to change the skylines and landscapes of an area. Notice the lack of vegetation in the second picture, and while it may just be an effect of the different time of day or season, they sky seems a lot more fogged in the second picture, possibly due to pollution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:35 PM

Shanghai has transformed and globalized so quickly in the last twenty years that it doesn't even look like that same place. Skies that were once seen are now blocked by skyscrapers. Buildings that still remain are overpowered and do not stand out like they once did.

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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

Following its decolonization, India has become a major spot were outsourcing of the telecommunications business has become common. An emerging middle class has managed to throw off many of the ancient yokes of Hinduism and caste beliefs. Many middle class Indians have access to the internet, computers and cell phones. However, the government has had a hard time keeping up with the nation's booming population. Poor sanitation and lack of things as simple as toilets have become serious problems in this industrializing nation.


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Paige Therien's curator insight, April 17, 1:41 PM

India's economy is transforming, but only for individuals, who are quickly becoming rich or, more commonly, part of the growing middle class.  This change, mixed with a corrupt, non-incentivized  government is creating a picture of uneven development in India.  The government is not supplying basic needs to the growing population, which mainly effects the poor.  Half of the population are lacking basic sanitation and access to clean water.  These needs can only be met with a strong infrastructure, which the government has neither the money nor the motivation to rebuild.  However, Indians do have the access to things like cellphones and televisions.  This is due to the fact that these goods are privatized and easy to obtain (as opposed to ripping apart a city to put infrastructure in place).  So, uneven development is seen not only in the general economy, but also in access to resources and material goods. 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 17, 6:42 AM

Consequences of urbanisation

Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 10:36 PM

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development in India?  These comedians are seeking to use humor to bring this issue to light.

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History of the India-Pakistan Border

History of the India-Pakistan Border | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

India-Pakistani conflicts have deep rooted causes that go as far back as colonialism. British India was a largely Hindu nation, but also had a large minority Muslim population. Following the decolonization of the colony, different leaders held different ideals on how the nation should be controlled. Many Hindu leaders called for an Indian state for Hindus only. As a result, the former British colony fragmented into several nations. While India was formed, so were the Islamic nations of Pakistan and Bangladesh. Hostile neighbors always result in border wars and this is just another example of this. As people with different cultural and religious ideologies clash, it is impossible to tell how gruesome the outcome. In fact, I recently read that in 1947 after decolonization, as many as 1 million were killed in clashes between Hindus and Muslims.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:07 PM

This article chonicles the history of the conflict between India and Pakistan, focusing on the disputed Kashmir region. The violence over the border is spurred by religion and political issues. But with India increasingly becoming bigger in a global scale what does that mean for this conflict with Pakistani? 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 12, 2013 7:41 PM

Colonialism rears its ugly head again, this time not in Africa but in India/Pakistan..but with the same result.  Borders drawn arbitrarily did not work in Africa, nor did it work in India.  It just casues the people there to try and work out and fix problems that the former colonial rulers casued.  They tried here to do it so that there was a land for the Muslim population to have a nation on the subcontinent and not subject to Hindu majority rule.  However Britain never looked at what would happen with a area that had a Hindu leader with a Muslim population.  He wanted to be independant, but the Muslim population wanted to go to Pakistan, so he went to India for help...sound confusing..it is..much like the Northern Ireland/UK/Republic of Ireland debate..there is no easy answer and it looks like we have to try to fix colonialism's problems again.

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NYTimes Video: Apartheid Haunts South Africa's Schools

NYTimes Video: Apartheid Haunts South Africa's Schools | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

Schools in South Africa remain as deeply divided as ever. Although Apartheid is over, blacks and whites are still segregated in schools based on where they grow up/income inequality/etc. This very situation still occurs in America today as well. Although Jim Crow laws in the South are long gone, the segregated school system remains today. Entire urban neighborhood are occupied by black residents and so school patterns are reflected by this. White flight has left many whites in suburban areas and better funded schools. In a way, post-Aparthied South Africa and post-Jim Crow America have many things in common.


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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:43 PM

In this video, it is inspiring to see the South African children have big dreams regardless of the situation in their country.  Even though they are impoverished and the public school system remains segragated and insufficient, they have hope.  Apartheid left deep scars on the country of South Africa and the kids in this video quite obviously still have hard times but they strive for education that is now available to them, continuing to work in the absence of teachers and struggling home lives.

Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 12:44 PM

With apartheid having just recently ended in the scope of history, this is not surprising. Tensions will always exist after conflicts, segregation, or wars for many in the generations that experienced it. Time will tell how South Africa handles this situation, but as it is now many of these children's parents were deeply involved or effected by the apartheid system.

Ido Lifshitz's curator insight, April 21, 6:40 PM

most of the whites study in private school which they get there better education , and it's very expensive so only few  of the black get the money to study there, however the blacks have Affirmative Action to get to the university after the school

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South Sudan Expels U.N. Rights Officer

South Sudan Expels U.N. Rights Officer | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

South Sudan expelled a U.N. officer after he argued the nation was failing to provide basic civil rights for all of its citizens as it had promised. Unfortunately, the nation has a long history of violence and civil rights abuses which has left a legacy in the nation. Sexual assault, harrassment and other crimes have become commonplace across the year old country and have led to numerous deats.

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Islamist killed in Tunisia clash

Islamist killed in Tunisia clash | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

The violence that continues to break out in this part of the world is terrible. In the U.S., we have little to worry about in terms of political and religious violence, but in the Middle East and North Africa, this has become an everyday occurrence. Not only are militants killed, but innocent people are often victims of terrorist attacks and other sorts of violence. The democratic process is very uncommon in this part of the world, so violence and terror is used to achieve their means.

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Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

This carpet shark has to be one of the most incredible creatures I have ever seen. It shows just how great the biodiversity is in areas mostly untouched by civilization. The Great Barrier Reef, though very delicate, has a variety of species found nowhere else in the world. This shark appears to be perfectly adapted to its environment because not only does it literally blend in with the ocean floor, but if it can swallow other sharks whole, it must be the king of the ocean. It is very sad to think of how many species once existed on our planet. In the Amazon, we wipe out species before they are even discovered. Let us hope that the South Pacific does not suffer the same fate.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 5:41 PM

When I first saw this image I thought that this white shark was swimming into a chest or something anything except for another shark. Then when opening the article it was apparent that the shark was being eaten by another shark. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 5:57 PM

A wobbegong, also known as the carpet shark, engulfs a bamboo shark in the Great Barrier Reef. This was a surprising and rare photo for Divers in Australia. It is crazy how animals so close in relativity can instantly become predators, and possibly a meal, to each other!

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 10:38 AM

This article reminds me of another video i've seen recently of a grouper fish swallowing a 4-foot black tip shark whole. A fisherman caught that on camera while trying to reel in the shark. Time and time again I'm reminded that not everything in nature is as it seems and that the unexpected should be expected. 

This makes me want to buy some scuba gear and take some diving classes, I ought to conquer my fear of sharks by safely observing them with a research team! 

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Vanuatu: Meet The Natives

  These five men very literally went on the adventure of their lives. While watching this video and seeing them experience so many fun and interesting things, I wonder whether or not they would wish to return to their old lives. And if they did, would they miss America? When they returned home, they did not adorn the traditional dress, but instead wore Western style suits in front of their kin. This video shows that although globalization is occurring very rapidly, there are still societies nearly untouched by "civilization." The South Pacific is one of the last "Garden of Eden" type places left in the world, and we must be careful not to destroy it.


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Caleb Gard's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:15 PM

These five men that were from the Pacific Island of Tanna go to America to get an experience for themselves of western culture for the first time. They travel many miles to find out for themselves what our culture was like. In doing this they brought over their own culture into America, making this a great expierience for themselves and those that they came in contact with on their journey. When these men came from Tanna to America to experience the cultural difference between the two places. Some long term effects of this experience is that the men might bring American cultures into their tribe, and they most likley had brought their cultures over here with the people that they came in contact with. Over all this excurssion will help the people cominig on contact with it learn about others cultural defferences from their own.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:14 PM

This promotion for the series "Meet the Natives" is a laughable cross-cultural experiment in forced globalization. While there are many political and cultural problems with this video, perhaps the Vanuatu people are less isolated and exotic than we really think. It's naive to think they are totally backward with no interest in connecting with the world.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 6:46 PM

It is amazing to see travels of Pacific Islanders to America and their brief takes on their journey. Usually it is the other way around with the Americans telling the stories. These pacific islanders are greeted by their friends upon their arrival home and talk about how they met so many great people.

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Tsunami of Change Hitting Burma!

The news that the Burmese have had their most fair elections since the era shortly after independence is very encouraging. Burma must work to remove the title of Myannmar which represents an authoritive reign that denied citizens basic human rights. With the news that this once political refugee's democratic party won every seat but two in Parliament, Burma finally becomes relevant on the world stage. With an era of democracy looming, this country can finally look forward to a potential bright future.


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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 11:52 PM

Wow I think this guy may have drank way to much coffee before making this video J  He is very excited about the changes in Burma although he should be it sounds as though this country is pretty much changing overnight

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 26, 2013 11:02 AM

It is amazing to see the kind of changes he has mentioned especially after military rule for about 50 years.  But you have to be careful as in all things.  Look at this article from BBC news http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12990563 Even though the changes have been made the military still holds some significant power.  It holds the most powerful ministires in the country and well as having 25%of the seats of both chambers of the parliament reserved for themselves.  In time if these restricitions are removed I think that sanctions could be removed a little at a time.

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Boxing in the Shadow of Pacquiao

Boxing in the Shadow of Pacquiao | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

Manny Pacquiao has become the face of the Philippines. He is an international superstar and renowned throughout the globe as one of the greatest fighters of his time. There is no question why young Filipino youth want to grow up to be like him. In this case, many young men get into rings and take punches for very few more dollars than they earn as farmers. However, the quest for glory, fame and an escape from poverty is a compelling force when compared to mundane lives as farmers.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 28, 2012 10:38 AM
It's going to be hard to get noticed after a great boxer Manny Pacquiao already made it. Boxing is a tough sport and it's growing to be less and less popular over the decades. I understand what the men are doing to make money, but I don't know if getting hit in the head for a living would be a great career choice.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 3:51 PM

This guy is super quick, he has seen his day but he is surely a legend especially in the Philippines.  When it is hard for people in poverty to have in interest in something, due to lack accessibility or other reasons, it is good to have someone to look up to.  Pacquiao can act as role model to not only people in poverty, but for anyone who is willing to work hard to succeed.  I have always believed that sport can bring anyone together, but resources such as a ball or equipment may be hard to come by.  Boxing is great in this situation, all you essentially need is your body and something to hit.

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A Burmese spring?

A Burmese spring? | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

In Burma, and other nations throughout Southeast Asia, authoritarian regimes backed by China run rampant. The Chinese governments allows these authoritarian regimes to exist because they serve China's own interest. This new sort of neocolonialism almost mirrors the policies practiced by the Untied States in the Western Hemisphere during the late 19th and early 20th century. It is encouraging to see that signs of basic human rights do appear to be on their way however. With the former resistance leader meeting with figures from national and international governments is a good start. 


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Incredible Shrinking Country

Incredible Shrinking Country | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

While it is evident that Japan's population is definitely shrinking, I do not believe this to be a major problem. A shrinking population can welcome more skilled immigrants from other parts of the world such as the United States and even those from developing nations looking for better opportunities. I think it is even important that some nations like Japan and those in Western Europe continue to shrink to counter the opposite phenomenon in sub-Saharan Africa and other parts of the globe where populations are growing in unsustaiable numbers. 


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 7, 2012 12:52 AM
This article helps to see why population is declining so rapidly in Japan. There is not just one contributing factor, but many factors. There is a high suicide rate and low birth rate. Many single Japanese women decide not to have children, while countries such as the US, many single women choose to have children. Japan's high divorce rate will also cause decline in population. Al of these factors that contribute to the decline in Japan's population is hurting the economy. If the population does not start to increase, Japan will be further in trouble.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:30 PM


Japan in the future will have a great economy because there will be more people working than being retired collecting a monthly check. Which means they have more taxes coming in than being given out and they can use that extra money to help create better things for their society.  It also could mean they wont have so much of a deficit like the United States does.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:21 PM

Japan's shrinking population poses many challenges to the state, namely a shrinking work force. While Japan is a very developed country, it still needs people to continue its growth. Perhaps the government should subsidize families with more than one child? a la reverse One Child policy. As I'm sure Japan would not welcome an influx of Han Chinese.

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Hiroshima After the Atomic Bomb

Hiroshima After the Atomic Bomb | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

This haunting image shows me two things. One, it shows how World War II proved that conflicts could no longer be contained regionally. In a global world, one nation's fight can spread to the globe's farthest corners. It also showed how deadly warfare had become. One atom bomb killed over 100,000 in Hiroshima and Nagasaki while destroying everything in its past. Only years later, the development of the H bomb had the potential to spread even more death and destruction. The second thing this shows me is just how quickly things can change. Today, Japan is not only rebuilt and a sprawling urban center (only 70 years later) but it is also one of the United States closest allies. Over the past seventy years, developments have completely changed the fabric of the global stage.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:15 PM

The panorama is eery.  The trees are dead, there is rubble, it is literally a deadzone.  No scary movie or horror story can compare to this type of devastation.  The black and white contrast seems to add even more depth to the pictures because of the consistent trend of nothingness.  It shows how massive the damage actually was.  What I found interesting is the trolley line with people riding bikes or walking on the same road.  Thinking of how they walked around after the bombs had dropped must be the strangest feeling because everything around them was simply gone.

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 11:26 AM

The thing that always stumps me about pictures after bombings and other disasters is the reason why some things are left standing. Here we see buildings destroyed and utterly annihilated as far as the eye can see, yet the telephone poles are still standing in some areas. The picture can't capture the true scope of the destruction, but it also shows how destruction is a bit random in its own way.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:32 PM

This panoramic photograph shows the devastation of Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb. Everything in sight is destroyed. Houses and poles that were lucky enough to still be standing are even lost causes. 

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Rise of solar panel energy in Bangladesh

The use of solar panel energy in Bangladesh is an example of using good green energy in a developing country. It is ridiculous to conceive Bangaldesh would build power plants, but solar energy is in abundance in Bangaldesh. It is important that we take new initiatives to alternate energy sources to creater a greener and more sustainable planet. Even developed nations like the United States could take lessons from Bangadesh.


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 11, 2012 7:18 PM
This reminds me of the power issues in the Phillipines. The use of soda bottles and water provide light for many villages in the Phillipines.... Here in Bangladesh they rely on green power- solar power. I am sure now that children can study better at night (because they have light) they have better progess at school. Pehaps people in Bangladesh without solar power should adopt the soda bottle technique from the Phillipines.
Elizabeth Allen's curator insight, December 11, 2012 7:18 PM

This reminds me of the power issues in the Phillipines.  The use of soda bottles and water provide light for many villages in the Phillipines....  Here in Bangladesh they rely on green power- solar power.  I am sure now that children can study better at night (because they have light)  they have better progess at school.  Pehaps people in Bangladesh without solar power should adopt the soda bottle technique from the Phillipines.  Elizabeth Allen

Mr. Rodrigues's curator insight, December 12, 2012 12:53 PM

Green power has a far wider impact than just "promoting" the preservation of the planet - due to the fact that many, if not all, of the methods of green power generation and delivery leverage locally sourced power channels.

 

This is truly democratizing who "can have" power, and the impact it will have on them. In the past, generators used dirty sources of power such as fossil fuels, which not only cost money, but would ruin already impoverished areas with unchecked pollution.

 

By harnessing what they have access to, the Bangladeshi people are gaining the benefits of the power (longer hours of useable time) but also not damaging the one resource they did have: the Earth.

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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

It is very uncommon for a nation with so many different ethnic groups to be so divided. The dividing factor in this case is Islam, pulling together people from different homelands. I think the most amazing part about this article is that Pakistanis allowed their country to be named by Western students from Cambridge. I believe that a name with deeper historical roots tied to their Islamic faith would have been more appropriate. Either way, this relatively new nation with its booming new capital of Islamabad is much more united than nations, such as those in sub-Saharan Africa, with this many ethnic groups.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:13 PM

In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to this region and named it Pakistan. The name was created by a group of students at Cambrige University and used the names of their homelands. Punjab, Afghania  Kashmir, Iran ,Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan is an acronym! 

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:06 AM

It is interesting to learn how particular countries got their names.  Pakistan was a British colony until 1947 and it was given the name Pakistan as an acronym for the 8 homelands in the country.  Pakistan is so ethnically divided that religion is really important for the country to stay together.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:27 PM

When you take in the way that the British Empire controlled many colonies and tried to spread their culture to such diverse regions, it is no suprise that Pakistan was named essentially by a game of Scrabble.  I suppose the naming is somewhat creative and certainly unique compared to how other countries get their names, yet just picturing a group of colleagues naming a country is strange.  Though the U.K. did grant them independance, how independant were they really if they weren't even given the right to name their own land.

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South Asian floods take economic toll

Seasonal monsoons have devastationg effects across South Asia. While these rainstorms are essential for growing rice, they also have very negative effects as well. Damage to homes, crops and infrastructure as well as disease, malnutrition and death come in masses due to these storms. In countries like Nepal and Bangladesh at the foothills of the Himalayas, the steep slope leads to fast erosion and all fertile soil is deposited downriver. Half the farmland has been abandoned due to this accompanied with high flooding.

 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 7, 2012 3:41 PM
The people that live here understand that they will have flooding every year. They're smart to build elevated roads so they have some way of transportation over flooded areas. It's weird to think that this is a normal thing for them and for us we close everything down and wait in our houses.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 7, 2012 12:17 AM
In an area already stricken with poverty, the floods manifest the problems. High rains and low elevations cause massive floods in areas such as Bangladesh and Nepal. Most areas do not receive aid, especially the remote areas of the villages.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 4:55 PM

The "socio-economics of flooding" is a side of the natural disaster we don't normally think about. People most affected by floods tend to live in areas with poor infrastructure and large populations. Their displacement to cities, like Dhaka, has incredible cost. For both the family and the new place they relocate to. 

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God Grew Tired of Us

God Grew Tired of Us | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

In the 1980s, Sudan and South Sudan waged a terrible war based solely on religion. It's terrible that over 25,000 boys in South Sudan had to flee for their lives in fear that they would be murdered just because they were Catholic. The three young boys had to travel thousands of miles to flee to Ethiopia to avoid persecution and eminent death. By escaping their country, they also escaped bomb raids, dehydration, starvation and genocide. Eventually, these boys manage to make it to America, surviving their valiant journey.


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Nigeria Accounts for 30 Percent of Sub-Saharan Africa’s Exports, Articles | THISDAY LIVE

Nigeria Accounts for 30 Percent of Sub-Saharan Africa’s Exports, Articles | THISDAY LIVE | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

Although sub-Saharan Africa has 5 of the world's 10 quickest developing nations, this ignores the fact that these five nations are putting out most of the continent's output. In fact, Nigeria alone accounts for 30% while South Africa and Angola make up another 40% combined. That makes 3 nations accounting for 70% of the continent's output. While these nations are blossoming, others are stuggling mightily and have no say on the world stage at all.

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