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Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting

Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

It is amazing how valuable land is across the globe. Countries rush and battle for submerged areas of land that have yet to reach sea level. The benefits to claiming these lands, however, are endless. Perhaps the nation can sell the real estate to speculators who could build luxury homes. Maybe the island will be rich in natural resorces ripe for plunder. Plus, the ownership of a 200 nautical mile radius is not bad either. In a world where untapped resources and unexplored land is no longer plentiful, islands like these provide endless opportunities.


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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 1:25 PM

This isn't an article from Oceania necessarily, but one that pertains to it. In an area made up of small island nations, the literal overnight emergence of new ones can change the politics of the surrounding countries, and even the number of seats at the United Nations in the far future.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:23 PM

When I read something like this all I can think is maybe this is what happened to Atlantis.  What if Atlantis was an island like this that existed just long enough for people to build a society on and then it sank beneath the sea.  Another think this makes me think of is the novel “Jingo” by Terry Pratchett, in it an island rises from the sea and leads to a war over which country owns it.  This is just an interesting phenomenon that leads to world arguments.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:29 PM

The EEZ policy that exist has made every space up for contentious conflict. The miles off the coast of Surtsey and other small islands have become valuable because of EEZ and conflict exist over islands that are uninhabited and useless. Economic geography can influence political geography when it comes to these small island and their exclusive economic zone.

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History of the India-Pakistan Border

History of the India-Pakistan Border | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

India-Pakistani conflicts have deep rooted causes that go as far back as colonialism. British India was a largely Hindu nation, but also had a large minority Muslim population. Following the decolonization of the colony, different leaders held different ideals on how the nation should be controlled. Many Hindu leaders called for an Indian state for Hindus only. As a result, the former British colony fragmented into several nations. While India was formed, so were the Islamic nations of Pakistan and Bangladesh. Hostile neighbors always result in border wars and this is just another example of this. As people with different cultural and religious ideologies clash, it is impossible to tell how gruesome the outcome. In fact, I recently read that in 1947 after decolonization, as many as 1 million were killed in clashes between Hindus and Muslims.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:07 PM

This article chonicles the history of the conflict between India and Pakistan, focusing on the disputed Kashmir region. The violence over the border is spurred by religion and political issues. But with India increasingly becoming bigger in a global scale what does that mean for this conflict with Pakistani? 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 12, 2013 7:41 PM

Colonialism rears its ugly head again, this time not in Africa but in India/Pakistan..but with the same result.  Borders drawn arbitrarily did not work in Africa, nor did it work in India.  It just casues the people there to try and work out and fix problems that the former colonial rulers casued.  They tried here to do it so that there was a land for the Muslim population to have a nation on the subcontinent and not subject to Hindu majority rule.  However Britain never looked at what would happen with a area that had a Hindu leader with a Muslim population.  He wanted to be independant, but the Muslim population wanted to go to Pakistan, so he went to India for help...sound confusing..it is..much like the Northern Ireland/UK/Republic of Ireland debate..there is no easy answer and it looks like we have to try to fix colonialism's problems again.