Geography 400 Blog
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Geography 400 Blog
Geography, History, Economics, World
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Rescooped by Derek Ethier from Geography Education!

Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting

Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting | Geography 400 Blog |

It is amazing how valuable land is across the globe. Countries rush and battle for submerged areas of land that have yet to reach sea level. The benefits to claiming these lands, however, are endless. Perhaps the nation can sell the real estate to speculators who could build luxury homes. Maybe the island will be rich in natural resorces ripe for plunder. Plus, the ownership of a 200 nautical mile radius is not bad either. In a world where untapped resources and unexplored land is no longer plentiful, islands like these provide endless opportunities.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:23 PM

When I read something like this all I can think is maybe this is what happened to Atlantis.  What if Atlantis was an island like this that existed just long enough for people to build a society on and then it sank beneath the sea.  Another think this makes me think of is the novel “Jingo” by Terry Pratchett, in it an island rises from the sea and leads to a war over which country owns it.  This is just an interesting phenomenon that leads to world arguments.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:29 PM

The EEZ policy that exist has made every space up for contentious conflict. The miles off the coast of Surtsey and other small islands have become valuable because of EEZ and conflict exist over islands that are uninhabited and useless. Economic geography can influence political geography when it comes to these small island and their exclusive economic zone.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 12, 10:46 AM

You have to be joking with me!!!!!!!!


Claims for a volcanic-induced mass of land?  In this day and age, one would hope that something like this would not lead to a long and drawn-out dispute.  There is much more pertinent issues present in this world.

 How about this for an idea?  Let's leave the "island" neutral and allow it it to be used as a temporary destination for whomever visits it.  It should be protected and preserved by everyone interested but not so much that visitors cannot temporarily explore and enjoy the island.  

Rescooped by Derek Ethier from Geography Education!

How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | Geography 400 Blog |

It is very uncommon for a nation with so many different ethnic groups to be so divided. The dividing factor in this case is Islam, pulling together people from different homelands. I think the most amazing part about this article is that Pakistanis allowed their country to be named by Western students from Cambridge. I believe that a name with deeper historical roots tied to their Islamic faith would have been more appropriate. Either way, this relatively new nation with its booming new capital of Islamabad is much more united than nations, such as those in sub-Saharan Africa, with this many ethnic groups.

Via Seth Dixon
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:28 AM

This article is very interesting as it explains the origin of the name Pakistan. Like many people I assumed that the name had to do with some old ethnic group but in reality its something of an acronym. Interestingly enough Pakistan is incredibly diverse and really only held together by the common Islamic religion. Names which are acronyms are more common place in government plans or cheesy infomercial products rather than the names of countries.     

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 3:15 PM

Pakistan is simply abbreviated from it's nations or nations that border Pakistan. P stands for Punjab, A stands for Afghania, K stands for Kashmir, I stands for Iran, S stands for Singh, T stands for Tukharistan, A stands for Afghanistan. However, there is no "N." Instead we classified the last letter as Balochistan but because "stan" is the Persian pronunciation for "country." Pakistan decided to abbreviate "N" as a silent so they can successfully abbreviate "Pakistan" instead of "Pakista."

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 9, 3:03 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, primarily for how ridiculous it is. Most of us figured there was some decent reason (like the neighboring 'Stan's) for why  and how Pakistan got its name. Nope, there really wasn't any good reason to name it Pakistan, it is an acronym. One that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.